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Joseph And Edna Josephson Institute For The Advancement Of Ethics

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NEWS
June 4, 1990 | GARRY ABRAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Is it too soon to worry about the equivalent of a "Keating Five" blight on the tender flower of democracy in Eastern Europe? Not for attorney Michael Josephson. Josephson believes governments emerging from communism's collapse could fritter away moral capital on scandals analogous to the savings and loan fiasco that has enveloped five U.S. Senators.
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NEWS
October 11, 1990 | GARRY ABRAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Michael Josephson has seen the future, and it doesn't work--at least for him. He sees high school students who cheated on exams becoming jet airline mechanics who falsify maintenance reports. He sees legions of young job applicants claiming degrees they don't have to get jobs they aren't qualified for. He sees a tooth-and-nail scramble for economic survival, reward and prestige that will trample proper conduct, honesty and altruism into a sticky, carpet-ruining mess.
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NEWS
October 11, 1990 | GARRY ABRAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Michael Josephson has seen the future, and it doesn't work--at least for him. He sees high school students who cheated on exams becoming jet airline mechanics who falsify maintenance reports. He sees legions of young job applicants claiming degrees they don't have to get jobs they aren't qualified for. He sees a tooth-and-nail scramble for economic survival, reward and prestige that will trample proper conduct, honesty and altruism into a sticky, carpet-ruining mess.
NEWS
June 4, 1990 | GARRY ABRAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Is it too soon to worry about the equivalent of a "Keating Five" blight on the tender flower of democracy in Eastern Europe? Not for attorney Michael Josephson. Josephson believes governments emerging from communism's collapse could fritter away moral capital on scandals analogous to the savings and loan fiasco that has enveloped five U.S. Senators.
SPORTS
March 9, 1990 | ELLIOTT ALMOND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The questions surrounding the death of Hank Gathers have moved far from the arena in which the former Loyola Marymount basketball star thrived. According to Michael Josephson, a Los Angeles ethics expert, a complex and ambiguous set of problems must be unraveled. The main one deals with who should have decided whether Gathers should have been playing Sunday night when he collapsed during a West Coast Conference tournament game and died 1 hour 40 minutes later.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 26, 1990 | FREDERICK M. MUIR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Metropolitan Water District is considering a plan to create and finance a private lobbying campaign to quietly bolster the giant water agency's limited clout in the state capital. The proposal, by a Los Angeles-based political consulting firm called the Dolphin Group, would cost $584,000 the first year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 1989 | FREDERICK M. MUIR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ethics reforms proposed by the mayor's special commission recently would force Los Angeles politicians to give up unofficial fringe benefits that money often cannot buy, such as choice season tickets to Lakers basketball games.
NEWS
August 19, 1992 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Home, marriage, kids, a dog or two--the hazy, feel-good terrain of family values--has emerged as a key theme at this week's Republican National Convention, with Bush-Quayle campaign forces struggling to win back turf that Republicans controlled with ease in the 1980s. President Bush had barely arrived here before declaring that families should be "a lot more like the Waltons and a lot less like the Simpsons."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 1989 | ALAN C. MILLER, Times Staff Writer
The Joint Legislative Ethics Committee was following a tradition of inaction when it decided last week not to investigate whether Assemblywoman Cathie Wright (R-Simi Valley) violated ethics rules by intervening with authorities on behalf of herself and her daughter for traffic offenses. The decision came out of the committee's first meeting in four years. Under the Legislature's narrowly drawn Code of Ethics, the panel can only consider cases when a lawmaker's action allegedly results in direct personal gain "which is in substantial conflict with the proper discharge of his duties in the public interest."
NEWS
December 10, 1991 | ELIZABETH VENANT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It has been--to crib a bit from Charles Dickens--the best of times for cheats and crooks, the worst of times for honest people. Or so it seems to many pulse-takers of the down-and-dirty '80s and the so-called "gentler" current decade. The parade of the morally tainted has caused professional ethicists to ask not who's been cheating, but rather who has not.
BUSINESS
May 7, 1989 | JIM SCHACHTER, Times Staff Writer
At the Pentagon, he presided over what critics say is a bloated, badly managed, occasionally corrupt bureaucracy. But when former Defense Secretary Frank C. Carlucci walked away Jan. 20 from 30 years of government service, he was transformed into a darling of the corporate world. In a matter of weeks, he accepted posts on the boards of directors of nine corporations--four of them major defense contractors. Between them, he easily will earn in excess of $150,000 a year--considerably more than the $99,500 he was paid to be second in command of the nation's defense.
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