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Joseph B Montoya

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NEWS
April 6, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Prosecutors have offered a plea bargain to a former state Senate aide indicted in the FBI's probe of state Capitol corruption, according to a defense lawyer. The attorney, Chris Wing, said his client, Amiel Jaramillo, has been given a chance to plead guilty to a lesser charge. Jaramillo, once the top aide to ex-state Sen. Joseph B. Montoya (D-Whittier), was accused by federal grand jurors of shaking down special interests for campaign and speech money for his boss.
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NEWS
November 17, 1996 | Associated Press
A judge will consider whether former state Sen. Joseph Montoya is too poor to finish paying $40,000 in fines and restitution that resulted from his corruption conviction. The once-powerful lawmaker, who was released from prison last year, told a U.S. District Court judge Friday: "I was used to the perks and honorariums. It's been a constant struggle the last six years." Montoya, 57, said he had to pay college expenses for his children while he was in prison.
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NEWS
December 6, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A jury of seven women and five men was selected in the Sacramento federal court trial of state Sen. Joseph B. Montoya (D-Whittier) on charges of extortion, bribery and racketeering. After the jury was sworn in, defense attorney Michael Sands said he will seek to prevent television stations from receiving and airing an FBI videotape showing Montoya accepting a $3,000 "honorarium" from federal undercover operatives. Opening statements are scheduled for today.
NEWS
July 8, 1995 | From a Times Staff Writer
Former state Sen. Joseph B. Montoya, the first legislator convicted in a 1989 probe of corruption in the state Capitol, was released Friday from the federal prison camp in Boron to begin serving the final three months of his six-year sentence at a halfway house. Montoya's attorney, Jeremiah Hallisey, said the former Whittier Democrat has been assigned to an unspecified halfway house in the Los Angeles area until he is freed from custody Oct. 7.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 1993 | From Times Wire Services
Former state Sen. Joseph B. Montoya, serving a 6 1/2-year sentence on political corruption charges, has been spending the last few nights only a few blocks from his old haunts in the state Capitol. Federal authorities last Friday moved the former Whittier Democrat from a federal prison facility near Boron in the Mojave Desert to the Sacramento County Jail.
NEWS
July 8, 1995 | From a Times Staff Writer
Former state Sen. Joseph B. Montoya, the first legislator convicted in a 1989 probe of corruption in the state Capitol, was released Friday from the federal prison camp in Boron to begin serving the final three months of his six-year sentence at a halfway house. Montoya's attorney, Jeremiah Hallisey, said the former Whittier Democrat has been assigned to an unspecified halfway house in the Los Angeles area until he is freed from custody Oct. 7.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 1990 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Sen. Joseph B. Montoya, facing the possibility of prison for his conviction on seven corruption charges, should not be sentenced to more than a year behind bars, his lawyers argued in documents filed in federal court. Montoya is due to be sentenced Thursday and his attorneys, Michael Sands and Bruce Kelton, contend that federal sentencing guidelines allow for a sentence of no more than six to 12 months in prison.
NEWS
October 11, 1989 | PAUL JACOBS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal grand jury Tuesday added four new charges to its original indictment of Sen. Joseph B. Montoya (D-Whittier) and a former top aide, Amiel A. Jaramillo. Montoya will face two charges of bribery in addition to charges of using his office for extortion, racketeering and money laundering that were included in the original indictment filed against the two men last May. Jaramillo has been charged with added counts of extortion and conspiracy.
NEWS
December 5, 1989 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sen. Joseph B. Montoya (D-Whittier), the first legislator indicted in a federal corruption probe in the state Capitol, went on trial Monday on 12 counts of extortion, bribery, racketeering and money laundering. U.S. District Judge Milton Schwartz, joined by prosecutors, Montoya and his attorneys, spent much of the day questioning individual jurors in private in an effort to impanel a jury that has not been influenced by media coverage of the case.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 1993 | From Times Wire Services
Former state Sen. Joseph B. Montoya, serving a 6 1/2-year sentence on political corruption charges, has been spending the last few nights only a few blocks from his old haunts in the state Capitol. Federal authorities last Friday moved the former Whittier Democrat from a federal prison facility near Boron in the Mojave Desert to the Sacramento County Jail.
NEWS
September 21, 1991 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK and PAUL JACOBS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a setback for the FBI's corruption probe in the state Capitol, a federal court of appeals Friday overturned the conviction of former Sen. Joseph B. Montoya on five counts of extortion. The U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that the jury received flawed instructions on the federal extortion law, but upheld Montoya's conviction on two remaining counts of racketeering and money-laundering.
NEWS
August 8, 1991
Your July 31 editorial "A Brilliant but Worrisome Choice" is itself worrisome. Calling Gov. Wilson's nomination of George to the state Supreme Court a "step backward" and stating that "there must be an effort to make sure that the high court reflects the people of California more fully than a panel of seven whites would," you criticize the governor for basing his selection on merit rather than demographics.
NEWS
June 15, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Imprisoned former state Sen. Joseph Montoya's corruption conviction should be overturned because of a new Supreme Court ruling, his lawyer said in arguments before a federal appeals court. The high court ruling, handed down May 23, restricts the use of the federal extortion statute in cases involving public officials. In essence, the Supreme Court said that to win a conviction, prosecutors must prove that a public official made an explicit promise to act in exchange for campaign contributions.
NEWS
May 25, 1991 | PAUL JACOBS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Attorneys for former state senators Paul Carpenter and Joseph B. Montoya predicted Friday that their clients' convictions on federal public corruption charges would be overturned on appeal because of a U.S. Supreme Court opinion this week. However, prosecutors in the U.S. attorney's office here said they will continue to fight to uphold the verdicts against the two men and that an ongoing probe of corruption in the state Capitol will proceed.
NEWS
September 18, 1990 | DANIEL M. WEINTRAUB and RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Former state Sen. Paul Carpenter's conviction Monday on federal corruption charges strikes at the heart of the way business is done at the state Capitol. Carpenter was not accused of selling his vote. Instead, he was charged with auctioning "access"--his time, energy and attention--to those who contributed to his campaign. In his case, federal prosecutors argued that politicians need not be caught trading their votes for money in order to be guilty of extortion.
NEWS
September 14, 1990 | From Staff and Wire Reports
A former top aide to convicted former state Sen. Joseph Montoya was sentenced Thursday to 90 days in jail for lying on a Veterans Administration home loan application. Amiel Jaramillo, 36, originally was charged with racketeering, extortion and conspiracy along with his former boss, who is serving a 6 1/2-year sentence in federal prison.
NEWS
July 17, 1990 | PAUL JACOBS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former state Sen. Joseph B. Montoya quietly entered a federal prison camp near the sweltering Mojave Desert town of Boron on Monday, one day before he was scheduled to begin serving a 6 1/2-year sentence for extortion, racketeering and money-laundering. Trading in his civilian clothes for a standard short-sleeved khaki prison uniform, Montoya, 51, became the first California legislator in 35 years to enter prison for crimes committed while in office.
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