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Joseph B Vasquez

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NEWS
December 20, 1995
Joseph B. Vasquez, who won the 1991 Sundance Film Festival screenwriting award for his independent film "Hangin' With the Homeboys," has died. He was 33. Vasquez died Saturday in San Diego of the complications of AIDS, according to a statement from Mark II Productions. A native of the Bronx, N.Y., Vasquez fashioned the award-winning film he also directed on the all-night adventures of a quartet of Bronx buddies.
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NEWS
December 20, 1995
Joseph B. Vasquez, who won the 1991 Sundance Film Festival screenwriting award for his independent film "Hangin' With the Homeboys," has died. He was 33. Vasquez died Saturday in San Diego of the complications of AIDS, according to a statement from Mark II Productions. A native of the Bronx, N.Y., Vasquez fashioned the award-winning film he also directed on the all-night adventures of a quartet of Bronx buddies.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 1991 | SHEILA BENSON, TIMES FILM CRITIC
The Sundance Film Festival has changed the course of more than one filmmaker or actor's life. Ask Steven Soderbergh or any of his "sex, lies, and videotape" stars Andie MacDowell, James Spader and Laura San Giacomo. Or, ask Reginald and Warrington Hudlin, whose genial Sundance hit "House Party" helped land the brothers a deal at Tri-Star Pictures. Only half-way through this year's festival, Sundance can claim two more discoveries: 22-year-old actress Patsy Kensit, whose performance in director Don Boyd's "Twenty-One" is the town's unqualified hit; and 27-year-old writer-director Joseph B. Vasquez, whose "Hangin' With the Homeboys" is in the best tradition of this independent-driven festival.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 1991 | STEVE WEINSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Hangin' With the Homeboys" opens with three menacing hoodlums--two Puerto Rican, one black--loudly and aggressively picking a fight with another young black man on a New York subway. As the brawl escalates, the white passengers hug their purses, hide their jewelry and cower in the corner of the train. After a few seconds of smashing each other on the floor, the thugs leap laughing to their feet and thank their terrified audience for attending another performance of "ghetto theater."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 1991 | STEVE WEINSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Hangin' With the Homeboys" opens with three menacing hoodlums--two Puerto Rican, one black--loudly and aggressively picking a fight with another young black man on a New York subway. As the brawl escalates, the white passengers hug their purses, hide their jewelry and cower in the corner of the train. After a few seconds of smashing each other on the floor, the thugs leap laughing to their feet and thank their terrified audience for attending another performance of "ghetto theater."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 1991 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joseph B. Vasquez's semi-autobiographical "Hangin' With the Homeboys" (selected theaters) is a pure joy, a sweet and funny take on life in the South Bronx that offers quite a contrast to the violent and tragic dramas that are usual for that setting. Vasquez, who started shooting super-8 movies when he was 12, got hold of a simple idea, a tale of a hectic Friday night in the life of four young men, all longtime friends, and crammed it with personal experiences.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 1992 | Shauna Snow
Wendell B. Harris Jr.'s "Chameleon Street" won the Grand Prize at the 1990 United States Film Festival, but lately the film has another distinction: "It's the first film produced in this country to be sold for remake rights before it was even distributed," Harris said recently.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 1991 | NINA J. EASTON
Freddy's dead. When the sixth installment of the popular horror series "A Nightmare on Elm Street" opens Sept. 13, fans will witness the murder of the villainous Freddy Krueger--and the end of the line for "Nightmare," New Line Cinema's most lucrative franchise. Why? "The controlling issue was an aesthetic one," says New Line Chairman Robert Shaye. "We were bereft of creative inspiration. . . . There were still secrets, still unanswered questions lingering (about Freddy).
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 1991 | SHEILA BENSON, TIMES FILM CRITIC
The Sundance Film Festival has changed the course of more than one filmmaker or actor's life. Ask Steven Soderbergh or any of his "sex, lies, and videotape" stars Andie MacDowell, James Spader and Laura San Giacomo. Or, ask Reginald and Warrington Hudlin, whose genial Sundance hit "House Party" helped land the brothers a deal at Tri-Star Pictures. Only half-way through this year's festival, Sundance can claim two more discoveries: 22-year-old actress Patsy Kensit, whose performance in director Don Boyd's "Twenty-One" is the town's unqualified hit; and 27-year-old writer-director Joseph B. Vasquez, whose "Hangin' With the Homeboys" is in the best tradition of this independent-driven festival.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 1996
Tickets for the Newport Beach International Film Festival screenings can be purchased at theaters; $6 general admission, $5 for seniors and children under 12, unless otherwise indicated: Edwards Island Fashion Island, Newport Beach, (714) 640-1218. * 2 p.m.: "Harvest Home," directed by Carlos Siguion-Reyna (Philippines, 1995). A seemingly strong family gradually disintegrates. * 4: "The Land of Milk and Honey," directed by Joseph Destein (U.S., 1995).
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 1992 | SHAUNA SNOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The NAACP celebrated what it called the "Black Renaissance" at the Wiltern Theatre Saturday night, during the presentation of the 24th annual NAACP Image Awards. But during interviews backstage, several top black entertainers--including Arsenio Hall, singer Nancy Wilson and actresses Charnelle Brown ("A Different World") and Janet Hubert ("Fresh Prince")--chose instead to stress inroads yet to be made.
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