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Joseph Barbera

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 2006 | Charles Solomon, Special to The Times
Joseph Barbera, who, with his longtime partner William "Bill" Hanna, created such beloved cartoon characters as Tom and Jerry, the Flintstones, the Jetsons, Yogi Bear, Scooby-Doo, Huckleberry Hound, Quick Draw McGraw and Jonny Quest, died of natural causes Monday at his Studio City home. He was 95. During the 1940s, Barbera and Hanna were MGM's blue-ribbon cartoon directors, winning seven Oscars for the "Tom and Jerry" shorts.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HOME & GARDEN
June 3, 2011 | By Lauren Beale, Los Angeles Times
The Studio City estate of the late Joseph Barbera, co-founder of Hanna Barbera Studios, and his wife, Sheila, is listed at $6,795,000. Set on 2 acres in Fryman Estates and built in 1988, the main residence has floor-to-ceiling stone fireplaces in the living and family rooms and a formal dining room large enough to seat 16. Including staff quarters, the property has five bedrooms and 6 1/2 bathrooms in the 6,899 square feet. The garage of 7,200 square feet houses a replica of Barbera's office at Hanna Barbera, multiple cars, an administrative office and storage.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 2001 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Animation pioneer and legend William Hanna, who revolutionized television animation along with his partner Joseph Barbera, creating hundreds of enduring characters such as Yogi Bear, Huckleberry Hound, the Flintstones, Scooby Doo, the Jetsons and numerous others, died Thursday at his North Hollywood home. He was 90.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 2009 | Susan King
As a youngster in the 1970s, Mike Henry, the executive producer and co-creator of "The Cleveland Show," Fox's upcoming animated spinoff of its hit "Family Guy," would have a "Yabba-dabba-doo" time sitting on shag carpet in the living room of his childhood home watching Hanna-Barbera cartoons such as "The Flintstones," "Scooby-Doo" and "The Jetsons." "It's all I watched as far as animated stuff goes," says Henry, who also supplies the voice of Cleveland, among other characters on the show.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2000 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Yabba-dabba-doo! The animated classics of William Hanna and Joseph Barbera are hotter than ever. The Cartoon Network is unveiling today its spinoff cable channel, Boomerang, which features the adventures of such Hanna-Barbera characters as the Jetsons, Jonny Quest, Tom and Jerry, Yogi Bear and his pal Boo Boo, Huckleberry Hound, Quick Draw McGraw and Baba Looey, Top Cat, Magilla Gorilla, Pixie & Dixie and Josie & the Pussycats.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 1997
Re "Animated Debate," Dec. 2: I respectfully suggest that there is nothing about the Hanna-Barbera studio that deserves consideration by the L.A. Cultural Heritage Commission. Not only are the buildings architecturally undistinguished (to say the least), they represent a terrible decline in the quality of animation itself. The so-called "limited animation" that the Hanna-Barbera studio cranked out in monumental quantities was the barest minimum, consisting largely of characters standing in place with only their mouths moving.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 1987 | CHARLES SOLOMON
This fall, kidvid producers will be watching to see if the Wizard of Oz is still "a whiz of a wiz." Two animated series based on the L. Frank Baum stories are scheduled to premiere next season. Joseph Barbera recently announced that Hanna-Barbera Productions has purchased the animation rights to the 34 copyrighted books and all 630 characters in the "Oz" series. He plans to develop the stories into an animated series, tentatively slated for CBS's Saturday morning lineup.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 1988 | CHARLES SOLOMON
William Hanna and Joseph Barbera, the creators of such enduring television characters as Yogi Bear, the Flintstones, the Jetsons and Scooby-Doo, have been partners for 50 years--longer than most marriages last. The continuing association of the two, who received the Governors Award from the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences at the 40th annual Emmy Awards Sunday night, is a classic example of yin and yang: Their talents and interests complement each other rather than overlap.
HOME & GARDEN
June 3, 2011 | By Lauren Beale, Los Angeles Times
The Studio City estate of the late Joseph Barbera, co-founder of Hanna Barbera Studios, and his wife, Sheila, is listed at $6,795,000. Set on 2 acres in Fryman Estates and built in 1988, the main residence has floor-to-ceiling stone fireplaces in the living and family rooms and a formal dining room large enough to seat 16. Including staff quarters, the property has five bedrooms and 6 1/2 bathrooms in the 6,899 square feet. The garage of 7,200 square feet houses a replica of Barbera's office at Hanna Barbera, multiple cars, an administrative office and storage.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 2009 | Susan King
As a youngster in the 1970s, Mike Henry, the executive producer and co-creator of "The Cleveland Show," Fox's upcoming animated spinoff of its hit "Family Guy," would have a "Yabba-dabba-doo" time sitting on shag carpet in the living room of his childhood home watching Hanna-Barbera cartoons such as "The Flintstones," "Scooby-Doo" and "The Jetsons." "It's all I watched as far as animated stuff goes," says Henry, who also supplies the voice of Cleveland, among other characters on the show.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 2006 | Charles Solomon, Special to The Times
Joseph Barbera, who, with his longtime partner William "Bill" Hanna, created such beloved cartoon characters as Tom and Jerry, the Flintstones, the Jetsons, Yogi Bear, Scooby-Doo, Huckleberry Hound, Quick Draw McGraw and Jonny Quest, died of natural causes Monday at his Studio City home. He was 95. During the 1940s, Barbera and Hanna were MGM's blue-ribbon cartoon directors, winning seven Oscars for the "Tom and Jerry" shorts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 2001 | GREG BRAXTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Animation pioneer and legend William Hanna, who revolutionized television animation along with his partner Joseph Barbera, creating hundreds of enduring characters such as Yogi Bear, Huckleberry Hound, the Flintstones, Scooby Doo, the Jetsons and numerous others, died Thursday at his North Hollywood home. He was 90.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2000 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Yabba-dabba-doo! The animated classics of William Hanna and Joseph Barbera are hotter than ever. The Cartoon Network is unveiling today its spinoff cable channel, Boomerang, which features the adventures of such Hanna-Barbera characters as the Jetsons, Jonny Quest, Tom and Jerry, Yogi Bear and his pal Boo Boo, Huckleberry Hound, Quick Draw McGraw and Baba Looey, Top Cat, Magilla Gorilla, Pixie & Dixie and Josie & the Pussycats.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 1997
Re "Animated Debate," Dec. 2: I respectfully suggest that there is nothing about the Hanna-Barbera studio that deserves consideration by the L.A. Cultural Heritage Commission. Not only are the buildings architecturally undistinguished (to say the least), they represent a terrible decline in the quality of animation itself. The so-called "limited animation" that the Hanna-Barbera studio cranked out in monumental quantities was the barest minimum, consisting largely of characters standing in place with only their mouths moving.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 1988 | CHARLES SOLOMON
William Hanna and Joseph Barbera, the creators of such enduring television characters as Yogi Bear, the Flintstones, the Jetsons and Scooby-Doo, have been partners for 50 years--longer than most marriages last. The continuing association of the two, who received the Governors Award from the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences at the 40th annual Emmy Awards Sunday night, is a classic example of yin and yang: Their talents and interests complement each other rather than overlap.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 1987 | CHARLES SOLOMON
This fall, kidvid producers will be watching to see if the Wizard of Oz is still "a whiz of a wiz." Two animated series based on the L. Frank Baum stories are scheduled to premiere next season. Joseph Barbera recently announced that Hanna-Barbera Productions has purchased the animation rights to the 34 copyrighted books and all 630 characters in the "Oz" series. He plans to develop the stories into an animated series, tentatively slated for CBS's Saturday morning lineup.
OPINION
December 31, 2006 | Joel Pett, Joel Pett is the Pulitzer Prize-winning editorial cartoonist of the Lexington Herald-Leader. His work also appears in USA Today.
As ever, cartoonists duly noted the passing of prominent newsmakers in 2006. "Obit toons" often include a touching pearly gates tribute or a respectfully somber black-bordered salute, prompting letter writers to laud our humanity, our discernment, our sensitivity -- if only for a day. Of course, not everyone in the public eye is missed. Although most get a courteous RIP, some get curtly ripped one last time.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 1989 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
The voice of Judy Jetson in the full-length animated feature "Jetsons: The Movie" will be that of pop singing star Tiffany, not Janet Waldo, who was Judy's original voice. Tiffany also performs three new songs on the sound track of the Hanna-Barbera film. Joseph Barbera said through a spokesman that "Tiffany's voice is so promiment in the musical segments of the film that we decided to feature her in the spoken part as well." A fully recorded sound track with Waldo was thrown out. Speculation that Tiffany was brought in to attract a teen audience could not be confirmed.
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