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Joseph Bonanno

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 2002 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Joseph Bonanno, the notorious gangster known as "Joe Bananas" who ran one of the nation's most powerful Mafia groups in the 1950s and '60s, died Saturday in Tucson. He was 97. Bonanno, who retired to Arizona in 1968 and had suffered from several health problems in recent years, died of heart failure, said his attorney, Alfred "Skip" Donau. He died peacefully, surrounded by his family, Donau said.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 2005 | Robert W. Welkos, Times Staff Writer
He is the eldest son of the late Joseph "Joe Bananas" Bonanno, who for decades headed one of the New York Mafia's "Five Families." He has served time in penitentiaries like McNeil Island, Terminal Island and San Quentin. And he once escaped a gangland hit on a Brooklyn sidewalk. "I heard the bullets going over my head," recalls Salvatore "Bill" Bonanno. "... If they knew what they were doing, I wouldn't be here."
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NEWS
November 1, 1986 | Associated Press
Joseph Bonanno, the 81-year-old retired crime boss who refused last year to answer questions about a Mafia "commission," was ordered released from prison Friday when a federal judge lifted his contempt citation. "The order committing Joseph Bonanno in civil contempt of Sept. 5, 1985, is hereby lifted," U.S. District Judge Richard Owen said in a written order. Bonanno "is released forthwith," it said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 2002 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Joseph Bonanno, the notorious gangster known as "Joe Bananas" who ran one of the nation's most powerful Mafia groups in the 1950s and '60s, died Saturday in Tucson. He was 97. Bonanno, who retired to Arizona in 1968 and had suffered from several health problems in recent years, died of heart failure, said his attorney, Alfred "Skip" Donau. He died peacefully, surrounded by his family, Donau said.
NEWS
April 16, 1985 | Associated Press
Joseph Bonanno Jr. pleaded guilty today to a federal charge of making a false statement in exchange for the government's agreeing to drop four charges contained in an indictment alleging a cocaine conspiracy. Bonanno, 39, entered his plea before U.S. District Judge Leland C. Nielsen, who will sentence him June 10. As part of the agreement, the government will recommend a four-month prison term for Bonanno, who served prison time in the 1970s on an extortion conviction.
NEWS
November 26, 1986
Reputed former mob chief Joseph Bonanno was indicted by a federal grand jury in New York on charges of criminal contempt for refusing to testify about the Mafia's ruling commission, prosecutors said. The 82-year-old Bonanno served 14 months in prison for civil contempt rather than testify about the commission. He was released on Oct. 31, when the government rested its case against eight men accused of participating in the commission. All were convicted.
NEWS
September 6, 1985
Retired mob leader Joseph Bonanno Sr. was jailed in Tucson for contempt of court after refusing to answer questions about organized crime in New York. But he later was taken to a hospital complaining of chest pains. U.S. District Judge Richard Owen sharply criticized Bonanno, 80, for an "absolute arrogant flouting of the duty to give testimony."
NEWS
November 20, 1985 | United Press International
Salvatore (Bill) Bonanno, son of the reputed Mafia figure Joseph Bonanno Sr., was found guilty Tuesday in an alleged home improvement scam. Bonanno, 53, was charged with one count of conspiracy and 18 counts of grand theft for his alleged involvement in the late 1970s with a home improvement contract scheme in which nine elderly Alameda County residents were bilked of $110,000. He was found guilty on the conspiracy count and eight of the grand theft counts.
NEWS
December 4, 1986 | Associated Press
Joseph Bonanno, the reputed elder statesman of organized crime, pleaded innocent today to charges of criminal contempt for refusing to testify about the mob's ruling commission in a federal trial. The 82-year-old Bonanno entered the plea through his lawyer, Ira London, who accused the government of persecution. He noted that Bonanno was freed Oct. 31 after serving 14 months in prison for civil contempt on the same matter.
NEWS
July 18, 1988
A federal appeals court has upheld the conviction and four-year prison sentence of Joseph Bonanno Jr., son of a reputed Mafia boss, in a fraudulent investment scheme involving presidential posters. Federal investigators said Bonanno, through a Los Gatos-based company, concocted a worthless purchase order for 400,000 historical posters featuring U.S. presidents, and used it to get a $200,000 loan from a Salt Lake City company.
NEWS
July 18, 1988
A federal appeals court has upheld the conviction and four-year prison sentence of Joseph Bonanno Jr., son of a reputed Mafia boss, in a fraudulent investment scheme involving presidential posters. Federal investigators said Bonanno, through a Los Gatos-based company, concocted a worthless purchase order for 400,000 historical posters featuring U.S. presidents, and used it to get a $200,000 loan from a Salt Lake City company.
NEWS
December 4, 1986 | Associated Press
Joseph Bonanno, the reputed elder statesman of organized crime, pleaded innocent today to charges of criminal contempt for refusing to testify about the mob's ruling commission in a federal trial. The 82-year-old Bonanno entered the plea through his lawyer, Ira London, who accused the government of persecution. He noted that Bonanno was freed Oct. 31 after serving 14 months in prison for civil contempt on the same matter.
NEWS
November 26, 1986
Reputed former mob chief Joseph Bonanno was indicted by a federal grand jury in New York on charges of criminal contempt for refusing to testify about the Mafia's ruling commission, prosecutors said. The 82-year-old Bonanno served 14 months in prison for civil contempt rather than testify about the commission. He was released on Oct. 31, when the government rested its case against eight men accused of participating in the commission. All were convicted.
NEWS
November 1, 1986 | Associated Press
Joseph Bonanno, the 81-year-old retired crime boss who refused last year to answer questions about a Mafia "commission," was ordered released from prison Friday when a federal judge lifted his contempt citation. "The order committing Joseph Bonanno in civil contempt of Sept. 5, 1985, is hereby lifted," U.S. District Judge Richard Owen said in a written order. Bonanno "is released forthwith," it said.
NEWS
November 20, 1985 | United Press International
Salvatore (Bill) Bonanno, son of the reputed Mafia figure Joseph Bonanno Sr., was found guilty Tuesday in an alleged home improvement scam. Bonanno, 53, was charged with one count of conspiracy and 18 counts of grand theft for his alleged involvement in the late 1970s with a home improvement contract scheme in which nine elderly Alameda County residents were bilked of $110,000. He was found guilty on the conspiracy count and eight of the grand theft counts.
NEWS
September 6, 1985
Retired mob leader Joseph Bonanno Sr. was jailed in Tucson for contempt of court after refusing to answer questions about organized crime in New York. But he later was taken to a hospital complaining of chest pains. U.S. District Judge Richard Owen sharply criticized Bonanno, 80, for an "absolute arrogant flouting of the duty to give testimony."
NEWS
September 5, 1985 | Associated Press
Retired Mafia leader Joseph Bonanno today was found in contempt of court by a federal judge for repeatedly refusing to answer questions about organized crime in New York. U.S. District Judge Richard Owen of New York ordered Bonanno "placed forthwith in the custody of the attorney general" for civil contempt. Bonanno had been ordered to go to a hospital today to give a deposition to government lawyers. "I'm too sick to answer the question," Bonanno, 80, said earlier today.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 2005 | Robert W. Welkos, Times Staff Writer
He is the eldest son of the late Joseph "Joe Bananas" Bonanno, who for decades headed one of the New York Mafia's "Five Families." He has served time in penitentiaries like McNeil Island, Terminal Island and San Quentin. And he once escaped a gangland hit on a Brooklyn sidewalk. "I heard the bullets going over my head," recalls Salvatore "Bill" Bonanno. "... If they knew what they were doing, I wouldn't be here."
NEWS
September 5, 1985 | Associated Press
Retired Mafia leader Joseph Bonanno today was found in contempt of court by a federal judge for repeatedly refusing to answer questions about organized crime in New York. U.S. District Judge Richard Owen of New York ordered Bonanno "placed forthwith in the custody of the attorney general" for civil contempt. Bonanno had been ordered to go to a hospital today to give a deposition to government lawyers. "I'm too sick to answer the question," Bonanno, 80, said earlier today.
NEWS
April 16, 1985 | Associated Press
Joseph Bonanno Jr. pleaded guilty today to a federal charge of making a false statement in exchange for the government's agreeing to drop four charges contained in an indictment alleging a cocaine conspiracy. Bonanno, 39, entered his plea before U.S. District Judge Leland C. Nielsen, who will sentence him June 10. As part of the agreement, the government will recommend a four-month prison term for Bonanno, who served prison time in the 1970s on an extortion conviction.
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