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Joseph C Wilson Iv

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 2005 | From Associated Press
Journalist Robert Novak's status as a CNN contributor will remain unaffected during a federal probe into the revelation of a CIA officer's identity, executives at the news channel say. "I think we're all aware that no one really knows what's going on in the investigation of the Valerie Plame incident," said Jonathan Klein, president of CNN/U.S. "So it would be awfully presumptuous of us to take steps against a guy in his career based on second-, third-, fourth-hand reporting."
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NATIONAL
October 2, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
U.S. District Judge Emmet Sullivan ruled that the FBI must publicly reveal much of its notes from an interview with former Vice President Dick Cheney during the investigation into who leaked the identity of CIA operative Valerie Plame. Her husband, Joseph C. Wilson IV, had publicly criticized the Bush administration about the Iraq war before her identity became public. Cheney was interviewed by special prosecutor Patrick J. Fitzgerald in 2004. Cheney's former top aide, I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby, was convicted of obstruction of justice and lying about his dealings with reporters.
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NATIONAL
October 2, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
U.S. District Judge Emmet Sullivan ruled that the FBI must publicly reveal much of its notes from an interview with former Vice President Dick Cheney during the investigation into who leaked the identity of CIA operative Valerie Plame. Her husband, Joseph C. Wilson IV, had publicly criticized the Bush administration about the Iraq war before her identity became public. Cheney was interviewed by special prosecutor Patrick J. Fitzgerald in 2004. Cheney's former top aide, I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby, was convicted of obstruction of justice and lying about his dealings with reporters.
OPINION
March 12, 2007
Re "The Joe and Valerie show," Opinion, March 8 What was clearly absent from Jonah Goldberg's "Swift boating" of Joseph C. Wilson IV and Valerie Plame were any substantive facts other than innuendos and a regurgitation of the principal talking points against Wilson, such as poor "unemployed" Joe really needing a trip to beautiful Niger and lying when he (allegedly) said that Vice President Dick Cheney requested he go, when the real "truth" was that his wife arranged it. Enough! Let's get to Goldberg's real issues: The Wilsons look cool; they write books; she likes high heels; she was a covert CIA agent, and he has that really cool commendation from George H.W. Bush for personally standing up to Saddam Hussein before the Persian Gulf War. Somehow, I just can't imagine Goldberg in any of those situations.
OPINION
November 3, 2005
Max Boot (Opinion, Nov. 2) takes the prize for spinning the Valerie Plame leak into the proverbial glass is half full. If I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby and other White House officials were "merely setting the record straight," why did Libby request anonymity in conversations with New York Times reporter Judith Miller? "Petty-ante perjury"? I agree it's not comparable to the Monica Lewinsky inquiry, but isn't that the point? This one led to war. MANLEY WITTEN Los Angeles The Times finally prints in Opinion critical background detail on Joseph C. Wilson IV and Plame.
OPINION
March 12, 2007
Re "The Joe and Valerie show," Opinion, March 8 What was clearly absent from Jonah Goldberg's "Swift boating" of Joseph C. Wilson IV and Valerie Plame were any substantive facts other than innuendos and a regurgitation of the principal talking points against Wilson, such as poor "unemployed" Joe really needing a trip to beautiful Niger and lying when he (allegedly) said that Vice President Dick Cheney requested he go, when the real "truth" was that his wife arranged it. Enough! Let's get to Goldberg's real issues: The Wilsons look cool; they write books; she likes high heels; she was a covert CIA agent, and he has that really cool commendation from George H.W. Bush for personally standing up to Saddam Hussein before the Persian Gulf War. Somehow, I just can't imagine Goldberg in any of those situations.
OPINION
August 13, 2004
There is a law, as there should be, against revealing the name of a covert CIA agent. It looks as if people in the Bush administration probably broke this law last summer. Annoyed beyond endurance at Joseph C. Wilson IV -- who was sent to find evidence that Saddam Hussein tried to buy uranium and who came back saying there wasn't any -- somebody in the administration told journalists that Wilson's wife had helped him get the job and, by the way, she was an undercover CIA agent.
OPINION
October 29, 2005
THE RULE OF LAW can be a nebulous concept, hard to define and easy to manipulate, but it was present Friday in all its majesty in a 7th-floor conference room at 950 Constitution Ave. in Washington. That's where Special Prosecutor Patrick J. Fitzgerald explained to the nation the charges in his investigation into the leak of the identity of CIA agent Valerie Plame. Those charges are at once disappointing and inspiring.
NATIONAL
October 15, 2003 | Richard B. Schmitt, Times Staff Writer
A federal judge has ordered five journalists, including a reporter for the Los Angeles Times, to identify government sources for their articles about former nuclear weapons scientist Wen Ho Lee. Lee is suing the government, alleging that officials illegally divulged private information about him in the course of investigating his role in suspected espionage at Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico four years ago. If upheld on appeal, the decision by U.S.
NATIONAL
July 7, 2005 | James Rainey, Times Staff Writer
The court hearing that resulted in New York Times reporter Judith Miller being sent to jail and Time magazine reporter Matthew Cooper agreeing to testify before a federal grand jury stemmed from a 2-year-old dispute related to President Bush's claim that Iraq possessed weapons of mass destruction. Question: How did the case get started? Answer: In July 2003, several Washington-based reporters were following up on statements by former U.S. envoy Joseph C. Wilson IV. The retired diplomat had written a newspaper article accusing Bush of "misrepresenting the facts" when Bush suggested that Iraqi President Saddam Hussein, before he was ousted in the U.S.-led war, had sought uranium from Niger for atomic weapons.
OPINION
November 3, 2005
Max Boot (Opinion, Nov. 2) takes the prize for spinning the Valerie Plame leak into the proverbial glass is half full. If I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby and other White House officials were "merely setting the record straight," why did Libby request anonymity in conversations with New York Times reporter Judith Miller? "Petty-ante perjury"? I agree it's not comparable to the Monica Lewinsky inquiry, but isn't that the point? This one led to war. MANLEY WITTEN Los Angeles The Times finally prints in Opinion critical background detail on Joseph C. Wilson IV and Plame.
OPINION
October 29, 2005
THE RULE OF LAW can be a nebulous concept, hard to define and easy to manipulate, but it was present Friday in all its majesty in a 7th-floor conference room at 950 Constitution Ave. in Washington. That's where Special Prosecutor Patrick J. Fitzgerald explained to the nation the charges in his investigation into the leak of the identity of CIA agent Valerie Plame. Those charges are at once disappointing and inspiring.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 2005 | From Associated Press
Journalist Robert Novak's status as a CNN contributor will remain unaffected during a federal probe into the revelation of a CIA officer's identity, executives at the news channel say. "I think we're all aware that no one really knows what's going on in the investigation of the Valerie Plame incident," said Jonathan Klein, president of CNN/U.S. "So it would be awfully presumptuous of us to take steps against a guy in his career based on second-, third-, fourth-hand reporting."
NATIONAL
July 7, 2005 | James Rainey, Times Staff Writer
The court hearing that resulted in New York Times reporter Judith Miller being sent to jail and Time magazine reporter Matthew Cooper agreeing to testify before a federal grand jury stemmed from a 2-year-old dispute related to President Bush's claim that Iraq possessed weapons of mass destruction. Question: How did the case get started? Answer: In July 2003, several Washington-based reporters were following up on statements by former U.S. envoy Joseph C. Wilson IV. The retired diplomat had written a newspaper article accusing Bush of "misrepresenting the facts" when Bush suggested that Iraqi President Saddam Hussein, before he was ousted in the U.S.-led war, had sought uranium from Niger for atomic weapons.
OPINION
August 13, 2004
There is a law, as there should be, against revealing the name of a covert CIA agent. It looks as if people in the Bush administration probably broke this law last summer. Annoyed beyond endurance at Joseph C. Wilson IV -- who was sent to find evidence that Saddam Hussein tried to buy uranium and who came back saying there wasn't any -- somebody in the administration told journalists that Wilson's wife had helped him get the job and, by the way, she was an undercover CIA agent.
NATIONAL
April 30, 2004 | Richard B. Schmitt, Times Staff Writer
Adding to a growing bookshelf of critiques of the Bush administration, former diplomat Joseph C. Wilson IV says in an account being published today that two top White House officials played roles in retaliating against him and his wife for criticizing administration war plans. But the question of who leaked the name of his wife, CIA operative Valerie Plame, to journalist Robert Novak remains a whodunit, Wilson said in an interview Thursday, admitting that he does not know who provided the information to Novak.
NATIONAL
April 30, 2004 | Richard B. Schmitt, Times Staff Writer
Adding to a growing bookshelf of critiques of the Bush administration, former diplomat Joseph C. Wilson IV says in an account being published today that two top White House officials played roles in retaliating against him and his wife for criticizing administration war plans. But the question of who leaked the name of his wife, CIA operative Valerie Plame, to journalist Robert Novak remains a whodunit, Wilson said in an interview Thursday, admitting that he does not know who provided the information to Novak.
OPINION
July 23, 2004
Re "A Right-Wing Smear Is Gathering Steam," a July 21 commentary by Joseph C. Wilson IV: I suspect that the intensity of attacks on Wilson is directly proportional to the likelihood of indictments coming down shortly against those who compromised national security. Virgil J. Jose Apple Valley
NATIONAL
October 15, 2003 | Richard B. Schmitt, Times Staff Writer
A federal judge has ordered five journalists, including a reporter for the Los Angeles Times, to identify government sources for their articles about former nuclear weapons scientist Wen Ho Lee. Lee is suing the government, alleging that officials illegally divulged private information about him in the course of investigating his role in suspected espionage at Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico four years ago. If upheld on appeal, the decision by U.S.
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