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Joseph Cedar

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2011 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Outside it is late Saturday night, just before midnight on La Croisette. Men in tuxedos, drunks in stinking T-shirts, women in evening gowns, bewildered tourists, hunched-over beggars with outstretched hands, Africans selling hats, all of humanity teems on the Cannes Film Festival's central artery. Inside the Plage Blanche, a posh private beach club with tight security just off La Croisette, a spot where it is quiet enough to hear the waves break, an intimate party is beginning for "Footnote," Israeli filmmaker Joseph Cedar's exceptional new film.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2011 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Outside it is late Saturday night, just before midnight on La Croisette. Men in tuxedos, drunks in stinking T-shirts, women in evening gowns, bewildered tourists, hunched-over beggars with outstretched hands, Africans selling hats, all of humanity teems on the Cannes Film Festival's central artery. Inside the Plage Blanche, a posh private beach club with tight security just off La Croisette, a spot where it is quiet enough to hear the waves break, an intimate party is beginning for "Footnote," Israeli filmmaker Joseph Cedar's exceptional new film.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 2002 | TOM TUGEND, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Some films are inspired by current events, but in creating "Time of Favor," director Joseph Cedar seemed to anticipate history. The Israeli movie, which opens today in Los Angeles, examines how a deadly fusion of religious fanaticism and nationalist fervor could lead to a nightmare scenario engulfing the incendiary Middle East, if not the world.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 2002 | TOM TUGEND, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Some films are inspired by current events, but in creating "Time of Favor," director Joseph Cedar seemed to anticipate history. The Israeli movie, which opens today in Los Angeles, examines how a deadly fusion of religious fanaticism and nationalist fervor could lead to a nightmare scenario engulfing the incendiary Middle East, if not the world.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 2012 | By Julie Makinen
This post has been updated, as indicated below. The  Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences invited 176 new members into the organization on Friday, including Octavia Spencer, Terrence Malick, Matthew McConaughey, Kristen Wiig, Kerry Washington, Will Packer, Wong Kar Wai and Michelle Yeoh. A Los Angeles Times study published earlier this year found that academy voters are markedly less diverse than the moviegoing public and even more monolithic than many in the film industry may suspect.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 2002 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
"Time of Favor" is one of the most successful, provocative and intensely contemporary of Israeli films, so much so that to watch it is to feel the country having a passionate argument with itself. Israel's entry for best foreign language Oscar and the winner of six Israeli Academy Awards, including best picture, best screenplay, best actor and best actress, "Time of Favor" is the impressive debut of 33-year-old writer-director Joseph Cedar.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2012 | By Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Times
It's a small, small world that's depicted in several Oscar nominees for best foreign and best documentary films — and getting even smaller and more inter-connected. The nominees in those two categories, from countries as disparate as Belgium and Iran, as well as Middle America, reflect what some say is an unusually international spirit to this year's nominees in many categories. "It's sort of a more global feeling here," said Wim Wenders, the German director, L.A. habitué and nominee for his pioneering 3-D documentary "Pina," about the late avant-garde choreographer Pina Bausch, speaking by phone from Berlin.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 2012 | By J. Hoberman, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The office pools have closed, let the drama begin: Silent film or 3-D talkie, Streep's Thatcher or Williams' Marilyn or maybe Viola Davis? Scorsese again? For me, the most fascinating question is which of the five foreign-film nominees will win. If you picked Asghar Farhadi's "A Separation" — a visceral chamber drama exposing all manner of class, religious and gender fissures in contemporary Iran — you went for the favorite, winner of numerous critics' awards, "a movie you'll love from a country you hate," as the late Bingham Ray jokingly promoted "The White Balloon.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 2001
Will vocal group 112 give rap mogul Sean "Puffy" Combs, acquitted recently of bribery and weapons charges, further reason to celebrate this week? It looks that way. "Part III," the Atlanta-based quartet's appropriately titled third album for Combs' Bad Boy Entertainment label, is on its way toward a debut in the upper reaches of the nation's album chart--possibly even No. 1--when SoundScan releases this week's sales results on Wednesday.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 2012 | By Noel Murray, Special to the Los Angeles Times
"Footnote" Sony, $30.99;Blu-ray, $35.99 Available on VOD beginning Tuesday Writer-director Joseph Cedar's foreign-language Oscar nominee is about academics who study the wordings of ancient texts, a fairly dry subject rendered here with some snap. Shlomo Bar Aba and Lior Ashkenazi play father and son philologists with differing views on how to research the Talmud; when the father wins an award that was meant for the son, the latter has to find a way to prevent his colleagues from righting the wrong, lest they shame his old man. Cedar gets across the history of these two - and the nature of their professions - by using every stylistic trick at his disposal, from direct addresses to the camera to on-screen text, aiming to show how even something as remote and imposing as the word of God can be personalized through the art of interpretation.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2008 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
"Beaufort" stands out, and not only because it's a significant Israeli film with an unexpected French name. Powerfully directed by Joseph Cedar, this is a war movie about a retreat, not a victory, a film so realistic, so intense, it verges on the surreal. It's also one of the strongest examples yet of a fearless new wave that has made Israel's cinema a force on the international scene.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 2011 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Cannes is always the film festival that critics have to go to, but this year it's shaping up as a place you actually might want to be. With Woody Allen's "Midnight in Paris" opening its 64th edition Wednesday night, Cannes is known as an event where art and commerce coexist uneasily, where the 20 presumably rarefied films in the official competition share time and space with the sprawling Marche du Film, a marketplace where 4,079 companies from...
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