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Joseph Chaikin

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 2003 | Mary Rourke, Times Staff Writer
Joseph Chaikin, a leader of the experimental theater movement of the 1960s and '70s whose work as an actor and director and as the founder of New York's Open Theater group earned him international recognition and three Obie awards, died Sunday of heart failure at his home in New York City. He was 67. Chaikin had struggled with health problems from childhood, when rheumatic fever damaged one of his heart valves.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 2003 | Sylvie Drake, Special to The Times
A friend sent an e-mail last week, telling me that Joseph Chaikin had died. Her dismay was implicit, but her second line was a loaded, rhetorical question. "Who," she asked, "will replace him?" The real question was "Who can?" In a world where things come and go at numbing speed (thoughts and emotions included), it stopped me. Joe Chaikin was a member of my generation.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 1988 | JANICE ARKATOV
Robert Woodruff doesn't want to talk about himself. It's not reverse ego, grandstanding or an absence of anything to say. It's just that the director responsible for staging much of Sam Shepard's early work in San Francisco (as well as his recent revival of Shepard's "Lie of the Mind" at the Taper) and for the award-winning "In the Belly of the Beast" at Taper, Too (1984) and the Mark Taper Forum (1985) would rather talk about actor-director Joseph Chaikin.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 2003 | Mary Rourke, Times Staff Writer
Joseph Chaikin, a leader of the experimental theater movement of the 1960s and '70s whose work as an actor and director and as the founder of New York's Open Theater group earned him international recognition and three Obie awards, died Sunday of heart failure at his home in New York City. He was 67. Chaikin had struggled with health problems from childhood, when rheumatic fever damaged one of his heart valves.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 2003 | Sylvie Drake, Special to The Times
A friend sent an e-mail last week, telling me that Joseph Chaikin had died. Her dismay was implicit, but her second line was a loaded, rhetorical question. "Who," she asked, "will replace him?" The real question was "Who can?" In a world where things come and go at numbing speed (thoughts and emotions included), it stopped me. Joe Chaikin was a member of my generation.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 1996 | JAN HERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Most people I know who are seriously interested in the theater don't really like it very much." --Joseph Chaikin, from his book "The Presence of the Actor" * To read Joseph Chaikin's resume, you'd think him exotic. The last thing Samuel Beckett wrote before he died, "What Is the Word?," was a poem dedicated to him and for him to perform.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 1988 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
Suppose that a painter suffered a blow on the head that erased his ability to see in colors, but not in black and white. What would his future work be like? Narrower in range but no less interesting, if the artist's vision was still there. In the same way, actor Joseph Chaikin can still fascinate an audience despite a new slowness with language, the result of a stroke suffered in 1984.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 1987 | LAWRENCE CHRISTON
An assassin's bullet is aimed at your heart. The assassin is your heart. Think of the care you must take in your steps, in your plot for getting through every waking day. To go through life like that has to give you a heightened consciousness of the strange evanescence of things, of the preciousness of the ordinary.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 1989 | SYLVIE DRAKE
New plays, a revival and a special engagement of the Taper's Improvisational Theatre Project (ITP) will constitute the 1990 season at the Mark Taper Forum's experimental Taper, Too. John Steppling's "The Thrill" (Jan.23-Feb.18), to be co-directed by the playwright and Taper associate artistic director Robert Egan, is described as "a story of tawdry love in a shopping mall with characters whose vulnerability and dreams are sometimes masked by emotional brutality."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 2000 | JANA J. MONJI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Susan Yankowitz's "Night Sky" is an engrossingly painful examination of an astronomer's fall into a black hole of aphasia. Lawrence Miller's set at the Odyssey Theatre separates three main spheres of existence in the astronomer's life--academic, personal and medical--by placing them on platforms that lift them above a blackened floor. Anna (Kimberly King) commands attention as a lecturer whose tools are words.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 1996 | JAN HERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Most people I know who are seriously interested in the theater don't really like it very much." --Joseph Chaikin, from his book "The Presence of the Actor" * To read Joseph Chaikin's resume, you'd think him exotic. The last thing Samuel Beckett wrote before he died, "What Is the Word?," was a poem dedicated to him and for him to perform.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 1988 | JANICE ARKATOV
Robert Woodruff doesn't want to talk about himself. It's not reverse ego, grandstanding or an absence of anything to say. It's just that the director responsible for staging much of Sam Shepard's early work in San Francisco (as well as his recent revival of Shepard's "Lie of the Mind" at the Taper) and for the award-winning "In the Belly of the Beast" at Taper, Too (1984) and the Mark Taper Forum (1985) would rather talk about actor-director Joseph Chaikin.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 1988 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
Suppose that a painter suffered a blow on the head that erased his ability to see in colors, but not in black and white. What would his future work be like? Narrower in range but no less interesting, if the artist's vision was still there. In the same way, actor Joseph Chaikin can still fascinate an audience despite a new slowness with language, the result of a stroke suffered in 1984.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 1987 | LAWRENCE CHRISTON
An assassin's bullet is aimed at your heart. The assassin is your heart. Think of the care you must take in your steps, in your plot for getting through every waking day. To go through life like that has to give you a heightened consciousness of the strange evanescence of things, of the preciousness of the ordinary.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 1994 | BERT ELJERA
The City Council has stood firm in its support for the Nov. 8 ballot measure that would deny illegal immigrants a variety of services, despite pleas from about a dozen speakers to reconsider the decision. Councilman Ho Chung, who abstained when the council voted in September to endorse Proposition 187, joined the endorsement last week, saying that U.S. immigration laws must be enforced.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Jacques Levy, a Broadway theater director most noted for the musical "Oh! Calcutta!," died of cancer Sept. 30. He was 69. Active in off-Broadway and regional theater, Levy directed the production's original staging in 1969 and its revival in 1976 for a total of more than 7,200 performances.
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