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Joseph Coors

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Joseph Coors, an heir to the brewing fortune who advised President Reagan and helped create the conservative Heritage Foundation, has died. He was 85. Coors died Saturday in Riverside County, the coroner's office said. In the 1970s, Coors donated money to help start the Heritage Foundation, a Washington think tank. He also was one of the backers and advisors in Reagan's "Kitchen Cabinet." Founded in 1873, Coors is the nation's third-largest brewer.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Joseph Coors, an heir to the brewing fortune who advised President Reagan and helped create the conservative Heritage Foundation, has died. He was 85. Coors died Saturday in Riverside County, the coroner's office said. In the 1970s, Coors donated money to help start the Heritage Foundation, a Washington think tank. He also was one of the backers and advisors in Reagan's "Kitchen Cabinet." Founded in 1873, Coors is the nation's third-largest brewer.
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NEWS
July 24, 1989
Rent subsidies of more than $16 million for Denver housing projects were approved two years ago after Joseph Coors, the Colorado brewer, wrote to HUD Secretary Samuel R. Pierce Jr., a newspaper reported. The New York Times cited government documents in stating that the Denver application appeared headed for rejection before the letter from Coors, a friend of former President Ronald Reagan. Thomas T.
BUSINESS
August 3, 2002 | From Bloomberg News
Joseph Coors Jr., a member of the family that founded Adolph Coors Co., the third-largest U.S. brewery, was swindled in a scheme in which he and others invested $40 million, the Securities and Exchange Commission said Friday. Golden Heritage, a family investment body controlled by Joseph Coors, joined a program that promised a 100% return per week, the SEC alleged in a complaint filed in a San Francisco federal court.
BUSINESS
August 3, 2002 | From Bloomberg News
Joseph Coors Jr., a member of the family that founded Adolph Coors Co., the third-largest U.S. brewery, was swindled in a scheme in which he and others invested $40 million, the Securities and Exchange Commission said Friday. Golden Heritage, a family investment body controlled by Joseph Coors, joined a program that promised a 100% return per week, the SEC alleged in a complaint filed in a San Francisco federal court.
NEWS
November 1, 1988 | SHIRLEY MARLOW
--As royal weddings go, this one was a simple affair. Only family members and senior Buddhist priests, but no foreign dignitaries, were present at the wedding of King Jigme Singye Wangchuk of Bhutan--a traditional hourlong Buddhist ceremony at an ancient monastery in Punakha, according to Bhutan Foreign Minister Dawa Tsering. It wasn't only the lack of pomp, however, that made the ceremony unusual by Western standards.
NEWS
August 20, 1987 | OSWALD JOHNSTON, Times Staff Writer
The AFL-CIO ended its contentious 10-year boycott of Coors beer Wednesday, announcing an agreement that for the first time will require the company to allow an expedited union vote at its main Colorado brewery and to employ union workers at any new Coors facility. AFL-CIO President Lane Kirkland, claiming victory in the agreement with the last major non-union beer company, declared the nationwide boycott "a complete success, a resounding success."
NEWS
May 21, 1987 | From a Times Staff Writer
The House and Senate committees investigating the Iran- contra scandal are scheduled to hear continued testimony today from retired Army Maj. Gen. John K. Singlaub and from three private contributors to the Nicaraguan rebel cause: Ellen Garwood, William O'Boyle and Joseph Coors. Singlaub, a former chief of staff of U.S. forces in South Korea, was the contras' most visible private fund-raiser in the United States from 1984 until 1986, when Congress banned U.S.
BUSINESS
September 27, 1987 | PAUL RICHTER, Times Staff Writer
The delegation from Adolph Coors Co. did not get the Empire State's warmest welcome when it arrived in Albany, N.Y., last March to publicize the brewery's expansion into the New York market. As the group trotted up the state Capitol steps, they were met by an angry group of union members who unfurled anti-Coors banners and chanted, "One, two, three, four, we don't want no Coors no more." When a Coors wholesaler lunged for a union banner, a scuffle broke out.
NEWS
September 18, 1988 | BELLA STUMBO, Times Staff Writer
Like most of the men in the family, Jeff Coors, 43, new president of the Adolph Coors Co., is quiet, friendly, totally unaffected and given to startling remarks. Sitting in his office on the brewery grounds, here is the first thing he said: "Jeez, I hope you don't try to paint this family as some sort of idealistic, above-it-all kind of family. There are no fairy tales involved in this family.
NEWS
July 24, 1989
Rent subsidies of more than $16 million for Denver housing projects were approved two years ago after Joseph Coors, the Colorado brewer, wrote to HUD Secretary Samuel R. Pierce Jr., a newspaper reported. The New York Times cited government documents in stating that the Denver application appeared headed for rejection before the letter from Coors, a friend of former President Ronald Reagan. Thomas T.
NEWS
November 1, 1988 | SHIRLEY MARLOW
--As royal weddings go, this one was a simple affair. Only family members and senior Buddhist priests, but no foreign dignitaries, were present at the wedding of King Jigme Singye Wangchuk of Bhutan--a traditional hourlong Buddhist ceremony at an ancient monastery in Punakha, according to Bhutan Foreign Minister Dawa Tsering. It wasn't only the lack of pomp, however, that made the ceremony unusual by Western standards.
NEWS
September 18, 1988 | BELLA STUMBO, Times Staff Writer
Like most of the men in the family, Jeff Coors, 43, new president of the Adolph Coors Co., is quiet, friendly, totally unaffected and given to startling remarks. Sitting in his office on the brewery grounds, here is the first thing he said: "Jeez, I hope you don't try to paint this family as some sort of idealistic, above-it-all kind of family. There are no fairy tales involved in this family.
BUSINESS
September 27, 1987 | PAUL RICHTER, Times Staff Writer
The delegation from Adolph Coors Co. did not get the Empire State's warmest welcome when it arrived in Albany, N.Y., last March to publicize the brewery's expansion into the New York market. As the group trotted up the state Capitol steps, they were met by an angry group of union members who unfurled anti-Coors banners and chanted, "One, two, three, four, we don't want no Coors no more." When a Coors wholesaler lunged for a union banner, a scuffle broke out.
NEWS
August 20, 1987 | OSWALD JOHNSTON, Times Staff Writer
The AFL-CIO ended its contentious 10-year boycott of Coors beer Wednesday, announcing an agreement that for the first time will require the company to allow an expedited union vote at its main Colorado brewery and to employ union workers at any new Coors facility. AFL-CIO President Lane Kirkland, claiming victory in the agreement with the last major non-union beer company, declared the nationwide boycott "a complete success, a resounding success."
NEWS
May 21, 1987 | From a Times Staff Writer
The House and Senate committees investigating the Iran- contra scandal are scheduled to hear continued testimony today from retired Army Maj. Gen. John K. Singlaub and from three private contributors to the Nicaraguan rebel cause: Ellen Garwood, William O'Boyle and Joseph Coors. Singlaub, a former chief of staff of U.S. forces in South Korea, was the contras' most visible private fund-raiser in the United States from 1984 until 1986, when Congress banned U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 1987
The account of the testimony of contra contributors William O'Boyle, Ellen Garwood and Joseph Coors (Times, May 22) almost made me feel ashamed to be an American. How tragic when people hate and fear others so much that they contribute millions of dollars to kill innocent women and children! Those same millions could have provided vaccines, medical care, provided potable drinking water and electricity and done so many other constructive things. What message do we send to the world when our citizens act out their mistrust in this way?
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