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Joseph Cornell

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October 28, 2007 | Michael J. Ybarra, Special to The Times
TWO large photographs greet visitors to the Joseph Cornell retrospective at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. The first shows a squat house on Utopia Parkway in Queens, N.Y., where Cornell lived from 1929 until his death in 1972. The second pictures shelves in the basement packed full of containers, each labeled like last winter's canning: springs, cordial glasses, pipes.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 2010 | By S. Kirk Walsh, Special to the Los Angeles Times
This Must Be the Place A Novel Kate Racculia Henry Holt: 354 pp., $25 During his lifetime, the artist and sculptor Joseph Cornell established a celebrated career by creating shadow boxes filled with eclectic assemblages of random objects that transformed these commonplace items into miniature landscapes of poetry. In her entertaining debut novel, "This Must Be the Place," Kate Racculia taps into the art and ideas of Cornell for inspiration and populates her charming, imaginative novel with found objects that speak to her characters' past lives and ultimately their long-held secrets.
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BOOKS
January 28, 1990
For an edition of the diaries and letters of artist Joseph Cornell, I should be most grateful to hear from anyone with any information concerning him. MARY ANN CAWS Scholars' Division Getty Center for the History of Art 401 Wilshire Blvd. Santa Monica, CA 90401
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2007 | Michael J. Ybarra, Special to The Times
TWO large photographs greet visitors to the Joseph Cornell retrospective at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. The first shows a squat house on Utopia Parkway in Queens, N.Y., where Cornell lived from 1929 until his death in 1972. The second pictures shelves in the basement packed full of containers, each labeled like last winter's canning: springs, cordial glasses, pipes.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 1997 | WILLIAM WILSON, TIMES ART CRITIC
Joseph Cornell made art as if he were a musician playing guitar without touching the strings. Born in 1903, he lived most of his adult life on a Flushing, Long Island, street with the angelically apt name Utopia Parkway. There he fashioned precious-junk boxes and collages that combine the wonder of childhood with the cosmic awe of old age.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 1987 | ROBERT McDONALD
The Art Gallery of San Diego State University is once again offering an exhibition of distinctive artistic merit. "The Sculptural Stage" pairs the work of Los Angeles-based artists John Frame and Jim Lawrence, both of whom use a tableau format. The "tableau vivant" is familiar to many Southern Californians who have witnessed the "living pictures" created annually at the Laguna Beach Pageant of the Masters.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 1993 | CATHY CURTIS
Once upon a time, there was a young man who lived with his widowed mother and invalid brother on Utopia Parkway in Flushing, N.Y. Having been forced to drop out of school to become the family's breadwinner when he was still a teen-ager, Joseph Cornell glumly peddled woolen samples door-to-door in lower Manhattan. His private life, however, was illuminated by his fascination with ballet, film, literature and art.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 2010 | By S. Kirk Walsh, Special to the Los Angeles Times
This Must Be the Place A Novel Kate Racculia Henry Holt: 354 pp., $25 During his lifetime, the artist and sculptor Joseph Cornell established a celebrated career by creating shadow boxes filled with eclectic assemblages of random objects that transformed these commonplace items into miniature landscapes of poetry. In her entertaining debut novel, "This Must Be the Place," Kate Racculia taps into the art and ideas of Cornell for inspiration and populates her charming, imaginative novel with found objects that speak to her characters' past lives and ultimately their long-held secrets.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 1988
Herbert and Nora Kaye Ross' eclectic collection--containing everything from blue chip artists' prints to ceramic cheese keepers and silver snuffboxes--will go on the auction block at 7:30 p.m. on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday at Butterfield & Butterfield's new Los Angeles facility.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 1997 | WILLIAM WILSON, TIMES ART CRITIC
Joseph Cornell made art as if he were a musician playing guitar without touching the strings. Born in 1903, he lived most of his adult life on a Flushing, Long Island, street with the angelically apt name Utopia Parkway. There he fashioned precious-junk boxes and collages that combine the wonder of childhood with the cosmic awe of old age.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 1993 | CATHY CURTIS
Once upon a time, there was a young man who lived with his widowed mother and invalid brother on Utopia Parkway in Flushing, N.Y. Having been forced to drop out of school to become the family's breadwinner when he was still a teen-ager, Joseph Cornell glumly peddled woolen samples door-to-door in lower Manhattan. His private life, however, was illuminated by his fascination with ballet, film, literature and art.
BOOKS
January 28, 1990
For an edition of the diaries and letters of artist Joseph Cornell, I should be most grateful to hear from anyone with any information concerning him. MARY ANN CAWS Scholars' Division Getty Center for the History of Art 401 Wilshire Blvd. Santa Monica, CA 90401
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 1987 | ROBERT McDONALD
The Art Gallery of San Diego State University is once again offering an exhibition of distinctive artistic merit. "The Sculptural Stage" pairs the work of Los Angeles-based artists John Frame and Jim Lawrence, both of whom use a tableau format. The "tableau vivant" is familiar to many Southern Californians who have witnessed the "living pictures" created annually at the Laguna Beach Pageant of the Masters.
NEWS
April 22, 2004 | David Pagel
"Picasso to Pollock: Modern Masterpieces From the Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art" is both more and less than its title suggests. More artists are included in the 59-work exhibition than the mainline Modernists who traveled the established path from Pablo Picasso's Cubism to Jackson Pollock's drips via Surrealism's psychological kinks. To be accurate, the five-gallery show would have to be retitled. But "Maurice B. Prendergast to Joseph Cornell" doesn't have the same ring.
NEWS
August 5, 1994
Want to get in tune with nature? Consider the Joseph Cornell Nature Awareness Family Workshop on Aug. 20, sponsored by the Laguna Art Museum. Held in conjunction with the museum's current exhibit, "Fragile Ecologies," the 9 a.m. to noon workshop will begin with a morning hike through the Laguna Coast Wilderness Park. Cost is $15 a person and reservations are required. Call the museum's education department, (714) 494-8971.
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