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Joseph D Carrabino

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NEWS
March 10, 1991 | WILLIAM TROMBLEY and MARK GLADSTONE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The State Board of Education, which usually competes with the state Cemetery Board and the Board of Veterinary Medicine Examiners for political excitement, has been alive with controversy recently. The 11 board members engage in sharp disputes at their monthly meetings. Voices ring out. Tables are pounded. Arms are waved in the air. Members of the audience no longer doze through the proceedings. Much of this new excitement is because of Board President Joseph D.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 1994
It is the only nonpartisan statewide race on the ballot, and could be decided in the primary if there is a majority vote-getter, although the large field of 12 candidates makes that unlikely. As top executive of the Department of Education, the officeholder oversees operations of the department, shares with the appointed State Board of Education policy-making decisions affecting the state's $29-billion-a-year, 5.
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NEWS
June 21, 1992 | WILLIAM TROMBLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
State Board of Education member Joseph D. Carrabino, who faces a Senate confirmation hearing July 1, has again been accused of making racially insensitive remarks. James Thrasher, a 42-year-old African-American high school teacher in Modesto, said Carrabino repeatedly refers to him as boy at meetings, despite Thrasher's requests that he not do so. Thrasher, who serves as a liaison between the California Teachers Assn.
NEWS
August 2, 1992 | WILLIAM TROMBLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Facing almost certain rejection of his appointment in the state Senate, Joseph D. Carrabino has resigned from the State Board of Education after six combative years. In a letter of resignation to Gov. Pete Wilson, dated Thursday, Carrabino, 67, said he will leave the board Sept. 30 because of "anger and frustration" over the behavior of state Supt. of Public Instruction Bill Honig.
NEWS
June 30, 1992 | CARL INGRAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
State Senate President Pro Tem David A. Roberti on Monday warned Joseph D. Carrabino, often embroiled in controversy during his six years as a member of the state Board of Education, that he probably will not be confirmed to serve another term. Carrabino and Roberti met privately for an hour in the Capitol to discuss the likely outcome of a Senate vote. Carrabino was reappointed to the board in January by Gov.
NEWS
August 2, 1992 | WILLIAM TROMBLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Facing almost certain rejection of his appointment in the state Senate, Joseph D. Carrabino has resigned from the State Board of Education after six combative years. In a letter of resignation to Gov. Pete Wilson, dated Thursday, Carrabino, 67, said he will leave the board Sept. 30 because of "anger and frustration" over the behavior of state Supt. of Public Instruction Bill Honig.
NEWS
July 13, 1991 | WILLIAM TROMBLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
State Supt. of Public Instruction Bill Honig refused to give the state Board of Education greater authority over educational policy Friday, after contending that board President Joseph D. Carrabino and others "went to the FBI and talked about how to put me in jail." The resulting exchange at the monthly board meeting was the most acrimonious in the power struggle between Honig and some board members that has lasted for nine months.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 1994
It is the only nonpartisan statewide race on the ballot, and could be decided in the primary if there is a majority vote-getter, although the large field of 12 candidates makes that unlikely. As top executive of the Department of Education, the officeholder oversees operations of the department, shares with the appointed State Board of Education policy-making decisions affecting the state's $29-billion-a-year, 5.
NEWS
July 26, 1992 | WILLIAM TROMBLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ever since he was indicted on state felony conflict of interest charges in March, state Supt. of Public Instruction Bill Honig has been blaming his troubles on a "right-wing conspiracy," organized by a "cabal of conservatives." Honig and his supporters said the indictment was engineered by members of the State Board of Education, a few legislators and legislative staff members, and some fundamentalist religious leaders. They believe that this "cabal" pressured Atty. Gen.
NEWS
May 15, 1992 | WILLIAM TROMBLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joseph D. Carrabino, a pugnacious Los Angeles conservative who has been reappointed to the State Board of Education by Gov. Pete Wilson, is facing mounting criticism over alleged racial slurs and other statements that critics say make him unfit to be a board member.
NEWS
July 26, 1992 | WILLIAM TROMBLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ever since he was indicted on state felony conflict of interest charges in March, state Supt. of Public Instruction Bill Honig has been blaming his troubles on a "right-wing conspiracy," organized by a "cabal of conservatives." Honig and his supporters said the indictment was engineered by members of the State Board of Education, a few legislators and legislative staff members, and some fundamentalist religious leaders. They believe that this "cabal" pressured Atty. Gen.
NEWS
June 30, 1992 | CARL INGRAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
State Senate President Pro Tem David A. Roberti on Monday warned Joseph D. Carrabino, often embroiled in controversy during his six years as a member of the state Board of Education, that he probably will not be confirmed to serve another term. Carrabino and Roberti met privately for an hour in the Capitol to discuss the likely outcome of a Senate vote. Carrabino was reappointed to the board in January by Gov.
NEWS
June 21, 1992 | WILLIAM TROMBLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
State Board of Education member Joseph D. Carrabino, who faces a Senate confirmation hearing July 1, has again been accused of making racially insensitive remarks. James Thrasher, a 42-year-old African-American high school teacher in Modesto, said Carrabino repeatedly refers to him as boy at meetings, despite Thrasher's requests that he not do so. Thrasher, who serves as a liaison between the California Teachers Assn.
NEWS
May 15, 1992 | WILLIAM TROMBLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joseph D. Carrabino, a pugnacious Los Angeles conservative who has been reappointed to the State Board of Education by Gov. Pete Wilson, is facing mounting criticism over alleged racial slurs and other statements that critics say make him unfit to be a board member.
NEWS
March 17, 1992 | From Associated Press
Gov. Pete Wilson on Monday reappointed state schools chief Bill Honig's main antagonist on California's Board of Education, a move Honig called an outrage designed to please conservatives. "The only reason he got (re)appointed is essentially because of the power of the right," Honig said of Wilson's decision to give Joseph Carrabino a new four-year term. "He's symbolic for whatever reason to their interest."
NEWS
July 13, 1991 | WILLIAM TROMBLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
State Supt. of Public Instruction Bill Honig refused to give the state Board of Education greater authority over educational policy Friday, after contending that board President Joseph D. Carrabino and others "went to the FBI and talked about how to put me in jail." The resulting exchange at the monthly board meeting was the most acrimonious in the power struggle between Honig and some board members that has lasted for nine months.
NEWS
March 17, 1992 | From Associated Press
Gov. Pete Wilson on Monday reappointed state schools chief Bill Honig's main antagonist on California's Board of Education, a move Honig called an outrage designed to please conservatives. "The only reason he got (re)appointed is essentially because of the power of the right," Honig said of Wilson's decision to give Joseph Carrabino a new four-year term. "He's symbolic for whatever reason to their interest."
NEWS
January 13, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Joseph D. Carrabino, emeritus professor of management in the UCLA Graduate School of Management, has been elected president of the state Board of Education. Carrabino has been a member of the board, which sets state policy for kindergarten through 12th grade, since 1986. Marion McDowell, a deputy superintendent in the Sequoia Union High School District, was elected board vice president. Two new members--Gertie B. Thomas of Albany and Kathryn M.
NEWS
March 10, 1991 | WILLIAM TROMBLEY and MARK GLADSTONE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The State Board of Education, which usually competes with the state Cemetery Board and the Board of Veterinary Medicine Examiners for political excitement, has been alive with controversy recently. The 11 board members engage in sharp disputes at their monthly meetings. Voices ring out. Tables are pounded. Arms are waved in the air. Members of the audience no longer doze through the proceedings. Much of this new excitement is because of Board President Joseph D.
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