Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJoseph D Mcnamara
IN THE NEWS

Joseph D Mcnamara

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 2, 1991 | From "The Blue Mirage," Joseph D. McNamara's third detective novel, due out in paperback this fall: and
"The hated hammering of the Uzi finally stopped. . . . The smoky room looked like a scene from Beirut. Bullet holes everywhere. Plaster hung from the ceiling, and there was a carpet of broken glass. Except for Paul English, who had fled after the money-carrying bandit, and Bobby Wheeler, who was cautiously emerging from the back room, we were all bleeding. Mary Falcone kept saying, 'It's all right, Manny. It's all right.'
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 2010 | By John Hoeffel, Los Angeles Times
When he signed the ballot argument for Proposition 19, Joseph D. McNamara, a retired San Jose police chief, didn't really know what he was getting himself into. Now, as the campaign hurtles toward election day, McNamara has become the public face of the initiative that would legalize marijuana. "Let's be honest," the unsmiling ex-cop, wearing a neatly knotted tie, a dark suit coat and an American flag lapel pin, intones in a television ad. "The war against marijuana has failed. " McNamara, whose stern visage also appears in newspaper ads, urges voters to join him and many others in law enforcement.
Advertisement
NEWS
June 2, 1991 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With a diploma from Harvard on the wall, a Jaguar in the parking lot and views on police work that would make the ACLU cheer, Joseph McNamara was never an ordinary cop. "The heritage of American police," McNamara, San Jose's outgoing police chief, told a recent gathering of psychologists at a San Francisco airport hotel, "is one of corruption, police brutality and discrimination, and misuse of police powers for political purposes."
NEWS
June 2, 1991 | From "The Blue Mirage," Joseph D. McNamara's third detective novel, due out in paperback this fall: and
"The hated hammering of the Uzi finally stopped. . . . The smoky room looked like a scene from Beirut. Bullet holes everywhere. Plaster hung from the ceiling, and there was a carpet of broken glass. Except for Paul English, who had fled after the money-carrying bandit, and Bobby Wheeler, who was cautiously emerging from the back room, we were all bleeding. Mary Falcone kept saying, 'It's all right, Manny. It's all right.'
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 2010 | By John Hoeffel, Los Angeles Times
When he signed the ballot argument for Proposition 19, Joseph D. McNamara, a retired San Jose police chief, didn't really know what he was getting himself into. Now, as the campaign hurtles toward election day, McNamara has become the public face of the initiative that would legalize marijuana. "Let's be honest," the unsmiling ex-cop, wearing a neatly knotted tie, a dark suit coat and an American flag lapel pin, intones in a television ad. "The war against marijuana has failed. " McNamara, whose stern visage also appears in newspaper ads, urges voters to join him and many others in law enforcement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 1992
In response to Joseph D. McNamara's column on the LAPD (Opinion, April 19): McNamara wrote that the LAPD style of policing is contrary to the community approach Williams and other chiefs have adopted. Los Angeles has over three times the area of Philadelphia and over twice the population, but very limited manpower. According to statistics published in The Times last year, Los Angeles had 8,300 officers vs. 6,200 for Philadelphia. It would take an additional 10,000 officers for L.A. to provide a "Philadelphia-style" operation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 1993 | RENE LYNCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Orange County Superior Court Judge James P. Gray said Wednesday that he will join prominent citizens across the country in urging President Bill Clinton and Congress to legalize drugs. Gray, along with an Anaheim surgeon and two ministers from the First African Methodist Episcopal Church in Los Angeles are among 19 civic and religious leaders and private citizens who signed a resolution last month declaring that the United States has lost the war on drugs.
BOOKS
June 5, 1988
POSTCARDS FROM THE EDGE by Carrie Fisher (Pocket Books: $4.50). Biting wit of a young, drugged-out, sex-saturated, neurotic--somewhat disenchanted-- Hollywood starlet. FATAL COMMAND by Joseph D. McNamara (Fawcett/Gold Medal: $3.95). Second novel from this moonlighting chief of police about a returning cop (Fraleigh) who is now involved in uncovering an industrial espionage crime. THE DESERT ROSE by Larry McMurtry (Pocket Books: $4.50).
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 2010 | By John Hoeffel, Los Angeles Times
Sen. Dianne Feinstein, California's senior U.S. senator, has lent her support to the campaign to defeat Proposition 19, the marijuana legalization measure on the state's November ballot. The prominent Democrat, first elected to the Senate in 1992, signed the ballot argument against the initiative. On Monday, she issued a statement through the opposition campaign calling the measure "a jumbled legal nightmare that will make our highways, our workplaces and our communities less safe."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 2000 | MATT LAIT and SCOTT GLOVER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Ex-Officer Rafael Perez and nearly a dozen other officers in the Los Angeles Police Department's now-notorious Rampart CRASH unit were tattooed with an ominous insignia that some say symbolized their dubious brand of policing. The officers, many of whom have been relieved of duty in connection with the department's ongoing corruption probe, had themselves tattooed with the image of a grinning skull with demonic eyes, several officers involved in the unit said.
NEWS
June 2, 1991 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With a diploma from Harvard on the wall, a Jaguar in the parking lot and views on police work that would make the ACLU cheer, Joseph McNamara was never an ordinary cop. "The heritage of American police," McNamara, San Jose's outgoing police chief, told a recent gathering of psychologists at a San Francisco airport hotel, "is one of corruption, police brutality and discrimination, and misuse of police powers for political purposes."
NEWS
June 19, 1985 | From Associated Press
Authorities have tentatively connected 19 missing persons and three dead people to the Calaveras County encampment of survivalist Leonard Lake and his friend, Charles Ng. Here is a list: - Paul Cosner, 40, a San Francisco car broker, who was last seen Nov. 2, 1984, when he went to show his car to a potential buyer he described as "weird." Lake was arrested with Cosner's car on June 2. - Harvey Dubs, 29; his wife, Deborah, 33, and their 16-month-old son, Sean, were last seen July 25, 1984.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 2010 | By John Hoeffel, Los Angeles Times
The battle over Proposition 19 has shifted to television sets and radios for the final week of the campaign, as both sides benefit from recent support from major financial backers. On Monday, George Soros, a multibillionaire investor who spent $3 million on earlier initiatives to change California's drug laws, endorsed the measure. "He plans to make a significant contribution," said Michael Vachon, an advisor to the philanthropist and hedge-fund chairman. The campaign to legalize marijuana in California plans to launch cable television commercials Tuesday in the Los Angeles area.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|