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Joseph Dear

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BUSINESS
July 2, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Clinton Names Choices for OSHA, AID: President Clinton said he will nominate Joseph Dear, former director of Washington state's Department of Labor and Industries, to be administrator of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration. If confirmed by the Senate, Dear will become assistant secretary of labor for occupational safety and health. Clinton also named Carol Lancaster as his choice for deputy administrator of the Agency for International Development.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
February 2, 2009 | Marc Lifsher
There doesn't appear to be a lot of philosophical or practical daylight between Joseph A. Dear, the new chief investment officer of the country's largest public pension fund, and the labor-oriented board that hired him. And he doesn't see much daylight in gloomy financial markets, either. Dear, 57, is leaving a similar post at the Washington State Investment Board to run the $177-billion portfolio at the much larger, 1.6-million-member California Public Employees' Retirement System, or CalPERS.
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BUSINESS
January 22, 2009 | Marc Lifsher
The head of the Washington State Investment Board is heading south to Sacramento to oversee investments at the nation's largest public pension fund, the California Public Employees' Retirement System. As chief investment officer, Joseph A. Dear, 57, faces the challenge of reversing steep losses inflicted by the financial downturn on the $178-billion fund, known as CalPERS.
BUSINESS
January 22, 2009 | Marc Lifsher
The head of the Washington State Investment Board is heading south to Sacramento to oversee investments at the nation's largest public pension fund, the California Public Employees' Retirement System. As chief investment officer, Joseph A. Dear, 57, faces the challenge of reversing steep losses inflicted by the financial downturn on the $178-billion fund, known as CalPERS.
BUSINESS
February 2, 2009 | Marc Lifsher
There doesn't appear to be a lot of philosophical or practical daylight between Joseph A. Dear, the new chief investment officer of the country's largest public pension fund, and the labor-oriented board that hired him. And he doesn't see much daylight in gloomy financial markets, either. Dear, 57, is leaving a similar post at the Washington State Investment Board to run the $177-billion portfolio at the much larger, 1.6-million-member California Public Employees' Retirement System, or CalPERS.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2010
Dear Amy: Our grandson recently got married. One Sunday afternoon, the newlyweds paid us an unexpected visit. After visiting for a short while, I thought my wife should have offered them coffee or tea. I would like to know who should take the initiative to make an offering. I feel that the wife (who is the homemaker) should have taken it upon herself (or should have asked me) to make a lunch or something to offer to our guests. I know we made a bad impression on them.
BUSINESS
December 22, 1994 | FRANK SWOBODA, WASHINGTON POST
Reports of repetitive motion injuries in the workplace continue to rise at epidemic rates while the overall number of other nonfatal injuries and illnesses declines, the Labor Department reported Wednesday. The Bureau of Labor Statistics' survey of workplace injuries and illnesses for 1993 showed a significant drop in overall reports of injuries.
BUSINESS
July 15, 2013 | By Ricardo Lopez
The nation's largest public pension fund, the California Public Employees' Retirement System, posted a 12.5% return on its investment portfolio in the fiscal year that ended June 30. The fund's assets stand at nearly $258 billion, according to Chief Investment Officer Joseph Dear, who reviewed the figures Monday at a meeting of the system's governing board. The gains were led by strong returns in the global public equity and real estate investments, officials announced Monday.
BUSINESS
July 22, 2009 | Marc Lifsher
With a state budget agreement at hand, look for Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger to tackle the state's troubled retirement system. On Tuesday, the country's two biggest public pension funds reported losing almost $100 billion in the fiscal year that ended June 30. And the governor is expected to highlight the new numbers as he renews a campaign to trim the cost of providing lifetime, fixed benefits to hundreds of thousands of government retirees.
BUSINESS
October 8, 2011 | By Marc Lifsher, Los Angeles Times
Top administrators and investment managers at the California Public Employees' Retirement System were awarded $4.5 million in bonuses, averaging 41% of their base salaries for the year that ended June 30. The bonuses ranged from a high of 73% of the $240,000 salary of the senior portfolio manager for fixed income to a low of 14% of the $358,280 salary for the senior investment officer in charge of risk management. The fixed income securities manager, Tom McDonagh, also got the largest bonus measured in total dollars, $212,064, which was pro-rated to cover 14.5 months in the position.
BUSINESS
July 2, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Clinton Names Choices for OSHA, AID: President Clinton said he will nominate Joseph Dear, former director of Washington state's Department of Labor and Industries, to be administrator of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration. If confirmed by the Senate, Dear will become assistant secretary of labor for occupational safety and health. Clinton also named Carol Lancaster as his choice for deputy administrator of the Agency for International Development.
NEWS
January 23, 2012 | By Marc Lifsher
 The nation's largest public pension fund, the California Public Employees' Retirement System, posted a low, single-digit return on its $229.5-billion investment portfolio in 2011, Chief Investment Officer Joseph Dear told his board. The giant fund, which provides retirement and other benefits for 1.6 million state and local government employees, saw its portfolio grow by just 1.1% in the calendar year that ended Dec. 31, Dear said at a board meeting in Monterey. During the 2011 calendar year, CalPERS lost 7.95% in public equity investments and earned approximately 12.37% on its private equity investments (through the third quarter)
BUSINESS
May 24, 2011 | By Marc Lifsher, Los Angeles Times
California's political watchdog agency has opened an investigation into gifts to state pension officials from private equity fund managers. The state's Fair Political Practices Commission is conducting the investigation, made public Monday, that focuses on executives at the California Public Employees' Retirement System. Last week CalPERS Chief Executive Anne Stausboll told administrators at the pension fund that some senior executives may have failed to report gifts properly on annual statements of economic interest filed with the state.
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