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Joseph Dear

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BUSINESS
July 2, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Clinton Names Choices for OSHA, AID: President Clinton said he will nominate Joseph Dear, former director of Washington state's Department of Labor and Industries, to be administrator of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration. If confirmed by the Senate, Dear will become assistant secretary of labor for occupational safety and health. Clinton also named Carol Lancaster as his choice for deputy administrator of the Agency for International Development.
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BUSINESS
February 2, 2009 | Marc Lifsher
There doesn't appear to be a lot of philosophical or practical daylight between Joseph A. Dear, the new chief investment officer of the country's largest public pension fund, and the labor-oriented board that hired him. And he doesn't see much daylight in gloomy financial markets, either. Dear, 57, is leaving a similar post at the Washington State Investment Board to run the $177-billion portfolio at the much larger, 1.6-million-member California Public Employees' Retirement System, or CalPERS.
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BUSINESS
January 22, 2009 | Marc Lifsher
The head of the Washington State Investment Board is heading south to Sacramento to oversee investments at the nation's largest public pension fund, the California Public Employees' Retirement System. As chief investment officer, Joseph A. Dear, 57, faces the challenge of reversing steep losses inflicted by the financial downturn on the $178-billion fund, known as CalPERS.
BUSINESS
January 22, 2009 | Marc Lifsher
The head of the Washington State Investment Board is heading south to Sacramento to oversee investments at the nation's largest public pension fund, the California Public Employees' Retirement System. As chief investment officer, Joseph A. Dear, 57, faces the challenge of reversing steep losses inflicted by the financial downturn on the $178-billion fund, known as CalPERS.
BUSINESS
February 2, 2009 | Marc Lifsher
There doesn't appear to be a lot of philosophical or practical daylight between Joseph A. Dear, the new chief investment officer of the country's largest public pension fund, and the labor-oriented board that hired him. And he doesn't see much daylight in gloomy financial markets, either. Dear, 57, is leaving a similar post at the Washington State Investment Board to run the $177-billion portfolio at the much larger, 1.6-million-member California Public Employees' Retirement System, or CalPERS.
BUSINESS
January 13, 2014 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO - California's huge pension fund reported a 16.2% return on its investments in 2013 - its best results in more than a decade. The California Public Employees' Retirement System, which provides benefits to about 1.7 million state and local government workers, retirees and their dependents, said its total investments were worth $282.6 billion as of Friday, the highest ever. Better known as CalPERS, the country's biggest public pension fund was especially helped by the stock market's best year since 1997.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2010
Dear Amy: Our grandson recently got married. One Sunday afternoon, the newlyweds paid us an unexpected visit. After visiting for a short while, I thought my wife should have offered them coffee or tea. I would like to know who should take the initiative to make an offering. I feel that the wife (who is the homemaker) should have taken it upon herself (or should have asked me) to make a lunch or something to offer to our guests. I know we made a bad impression on them.
BUSINESS
December 22, 1994 | FRANK SWOBODA, WASHINGTON POST
Reports of repetitive motion injuries in the workplace continue to rise at epidemic rates while the overall number of other nonfatal injuries and illnesses declines, the Labor Department reported Wednesday. The Bureau of Labor Statistics' survey of workplace injuries and illnesses for 1993 showed a significant drop in overall reports of injuries.
BUSINESS
July 15, 2013 | By Ricardo Lopez
The nation's largest public pension fund, the California Public Employees' Retirement System, posted a 12.5% return on its investment portfolio in the fiscal year that ended June 30. The fund's assets stand at nearly $258 billion, according to Chief Investment Officer Joseph Dear, who reviewed the figures Monday at a meeting of the system's governing board. The gains were led by strong returns in the global public equity and real estate investments, officials announced Monday.
BUSINESS
December 24, 2010 | By Marc Lifsher, Los Angeles Times
The California Public Employees' Retirement System is claiming significant success with a nearly year-old initiative to pressure companies in which it invests to require a majority vote of shareholders to elect directors. The $221-billion pension fund, the largest in the nation, now is setting its sights on Apple Inc. . CalPERS, which has a long history of corporate-governance activism, said it plans to introduce shareholder majority-vote resolutions at Apple and three other companies next year.
BUSINESS
July 2, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Clinton Names Choices for OSHA, AID: President Clinton said he will nominate Joseph Dear, former director of Washington state's Department of Labor and Industries, to be administrator of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration. If confirmed by the Senate, Dear will become assistant secretary of labor for occupational safety and health. Clinton also named Carol Lancaster as his choice for deputy administrator of the Agency for International Development.
BUSINESS
October 11, 2010 | Bloomberg News
The California Public Employees' Retirement System, the biggest U.S. public pension fund, said it's severing ties with Pacific Corporate Group as it revamps its private-equity program. Pacific Corporate Group will no longer help manage two emerging-markets funds with more than $1 billion combined or run the pension system's Clean Energy & Technology Fund, Calpers said Monday. Chief Investment Officer Joseph Dear is overhauling Calpers's private-equity strategy after the system was caught up in the scandal involving payments to placement agents, third parties who help money managers find business.
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