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NEWS
December 20, 1994 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton named Hayward Police Chief Joseph E. Brann on Monday to direct the effort to put 100,000 new police officers on the nation's streets, even as House Republicans vowed to drastically overhaul the program.
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NEWS
December 20, 1994 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton named Hayward Police Chief Joseph E. Brann on Monday to direct the effort to put 100,000 new police officers on the nation's streets, even as House Republicans vowed to drastically overhaul the program.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 27, 1989 | CHRIS WOODYARD
A veteran Santa Ana police captain who helped shape the department's problem-oriented approach to law enforcement has been named the new chief of the Hayward Police Department. Police Capt. Joseph E. Brann, 41, is "a solid cop with a very broad background" who will soon be taking over the 150-officer department in the city on San Francisco Bay, just south of Oakland, Hayward City Manager Louis Garcia said.
NEWS
February 9, 1997 | GEORGE RAMOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Panelists at a Los Angeles community policing summit Saturday said the Police Department is marshaling more resources to combat domestic violence, noting that LAPD officers get almost twice as much training to handle domestic violence calls than what is required by the state. Officer Debbie Dresser, who teaches at the Police Academy, told a domestic violence workshop that cadets receive 14 hours of instruction--more than the eight required. Officers also get periodic instruction on the issue.
NEWS
December 20, 1994 | From staff and wire service reports
As a result of the recently passed federal crime bill, the Orange County Sheriff's Department and 11 cities in the county were authorized Monday to hire a total of 49 law enforcement officers with a total of about $3.6 million in federal grants. But some city officials have said they may not be able to make the hires because they cannot afford to match the grants, which the bill requires.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 1987 | SANDRA CROCKETT, Times Staff Writer
A man police believe has been involved in at least 17 Orange County bank robberies in the past three months--most of them in Santa Ana--made the mistake of "sticking around the same place too long," authorities said Friday. James C.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 1997 | JODI WILGOREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A day after Los Angeles police brass said detectives sometimes botch homicide cases because they are overworked and swamped with paper, the federal government Wednesday announced a $14.6-million grant that could put 219 more officers on the city's streets and fund a variety of technology improvements. The latest infusion of cash from the Clinton administration comes on top of $127 million that the Los Angeles Police Department has received over the past four years to expand its ranks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 26, 2001 | TINA DAUNT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A two-term California governor, a former New York City police commissioner and a number of well-known attorneys, prosecutors and police experts have applied to serve as the independent monitor overseeing reforms in the Los Angeles Police Department, according to a list of candidates obtained by The Times. George Deukmejian, who served as California's governor from 1983 to 1991, applied as part of a team of consultants from a Los Angeles auditing firm.
NEWS
January 13, 1997 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This Texas city took account of something that many other cities did not: that a much ballyhooed federal program to put 100,000 more police officers on the beat nationwide would stop paying the costs after just three years. So, soon after signing up for the program, city officials rounded up enough money to make sure the new officers would not just vanish when the three years were up. In fact, they helped pass a half-cent sales tax to hire even more police officers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 1988 | LANIE JONES, Times Staff Writer
Beginning next Tuesday, whenever Santa Ana vice officers arrest someone for soliciting a prostitute, they will give him a bluntly worded flyer developed by county health officials. "When you buy sex, you may get more than you paid for," it warns. "The extras you might get from a prostitute are: AIDS, syphilis, gonorrhea, herpes, lice, warts and there are others."
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