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Joseph E Levine

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 1987 | JACK JONES, Times Staff Writer
Joseph E. Levine, the one-time Boston shoeshine boy who became a multimillionaire movie mogul with saturation screening and intense publicity campaigns, died Friday in Greenwich, Conn., where he had been ailing for several months. He was 81. Levine had produced and/or distributed 498 motion pictures since the days, he noted in a recent interview, when "I used to hustle the back roads of New England as a small-time distributor."
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 1997 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
It's one thing for a film to retain every bit of its worth after more than 30 years, but more impressive is the ability to be increasingly relevant and moving with the passage of time. Such is the case with Jean-Luc Godard's 1963 "Contempt." Perhaps how thin the cinematic gruel has become over the past decades is what makes us appreciate the thematic strengths of this work.
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NEWS
July 31, 1987 | Associated Press
Joseph E. Levine, a pioneer independent producer who often was called one of the last movie moguls, died today at Greenwich Hospital after a short illness. He was 81. Among the films he produced were "The Graduate," "Carnal Knowledge," "The Lion in Winter," "A Bridge Too Far" and "The Producers." A self-made millionaire, Levine was credited with inventing saturation booking, the practice of releasing a movie across the country with tremendous promotion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 1987 | JACK JONES, Times Staff Writer
Joseph E. Levine, the one-time Boston shoeshine boy who became a multimillionaire movie mogul with saturation screening and intense publicity campaigns, died Friday in Greenwich, Conn., where he had been ailing for several months. He was 81. Levine had produced and/or distributed 498 motion pictures since the days, he noted in a recent interview, when "I used to hustle the back roads of New England as a small-time distributor."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 1997 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
It's one thing for a film to retain every bit of its worth after more than 30 years, but more impressive is the ability to be increasingly relevant and moving with the passage of time. Such is the case with Jean-Luc Godard's 1963 "Contempt." Perhaps how thin the cinematic gruel has become over the past decades is what makes us appreciate the thematic strengths of this work.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 1987 | DONNA ROSENTHAL
Joseph E. Levine is a pirate with spilkes (Yiddish for "ants in the pants"). "I've made a bundle by not following the rules--so why stop now?" says the man who considers himself the last of a vanishing species, movie mogul. The multimillionaire has presented, produced, and acquired or distributed 498 disparate motion pictures--from "Hercules" to the early Fellini masterpieces, "The Graduate," "The Lion in Winter" and "A Bridge Too Far."
NEWS
June 12, 1993
Julius Sprechman, 73, film company accountant who became the novelist J.R. Sprechman when he was 66. After serving in World War II, Sprechman joined MGM as senior accountant and systems analyst, and later worked for producer Joseph E. Levine and Embassy Pictures. In 1981 he joined Kaleidoscope Films, which produces trailers and commercials, and was chief financial officer at the time of his death.
NEWS
January 13, 1994
Harvey Matofsky, 60, film and television producer and publicist. The Brooklyn-born Matofsky earned his bachelor's degree in journalism at New York University and began his career as a film critic. He later worked in publicity for United Artists, Charles Schneer's Production Co. in London and Joseph E. Levine's Embassy Pictures in Rome, where he promoted the films of Federico Fellini.
NEWS
August 7, 1989 | From Times wire services
The 19th-Century farm immortalized in Andrew Wyeth's painting "Christina's World" is being sold, it was learned today. The Olson House in Cushing, Me., is on about 20 acres of coastal meadowland with 1,800 feet of rocky shore frontage on Maple Juice Cove. For more than 39 years, Andrew Wyeth painted the farmhouse, barn and the surrounding views as well as the Olson family in some of his most admired watercolor studies. The late Hollywood producer, Joseph E.
NEWS
October 2, 1986 | Associated Press
The farm immortalized in Andrew Wyeth's painting "Christina's World" has been sold, and film producer Joseph E. Levine is glad to be rid of it. Levine, who lives in New York, said a feud with neighbors over his ill-fated attempt in the 1970s to turn the property into a museum left him so embittered that he'll never return to Cushing.
NEWS
July 31, 1987 | Associated Press
Joseph E. Levine, a pioneer independent producer who often was called one of the last movie moguls, died today at Greenwich Hospital after a short illness. He was 81. Among the films he produced were "The Graduate," "Carnal Knowledge," "The Lion in Winter," "A Bridge Too Far" and "The Producers." A self-made millionaire, Levine was credited with inventing saturation booking, the practice of releasing a movie across the country with tremendous promotion.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 1987 | DONNA ROSENTHAL
Joseph E. Levine is a pirate with spilkes (Yiddish for "ants in the pants"). "I've made a bundle by not following the rules--so why stop now?" says the man who considers himself the last of a vanishing species, movie mogul. The multimillionaire has presented, produced, and acquired or distributed 498 disparate motion pictures--from "Hercules" to the early Fellini masterpieces, "The Graduate," "The Lion in Winter" and "A Bridge Too Far."
NEWS
September 5, 1992 | Special to The Times
The South Carolina Supreme Court has thrown out a lawsuit by a Greenville, S.C., man, who claimed $45 million in Andrew Wyeth paintings had been improperly sold to a Japanese company. The target of the lawsuit was Arthur Magill, who bought the paintings in 1979 and for 11 years allowed them to be displayed in the Greenville County Museum of Art. Magill had paid movie producer Joseph E. Levine $3.5 million for the collection, considered one of the finest of its kind in the nation.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 2006 | Susan King
THOUGH sword-and-sandal films have been a box-office staple since the silent era, the genre hit its apex in the late 1950s and early '60s in Italy with such films as "Hercules" with Steve Reeves, "The Giant of Metropolis" with Gordon Mitchell and "The Loves of Hercules" with Mickey Hargitay.
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