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Joseph E Murray

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October 9, 1990 | ROBERT STEINBROOK and VICTOR F. ZONANA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Two American physicians who pioneered organ transplantation techniques that have helped save tens of thousands of patients were jointly awarded the Nobel Prize in medicine Monday. The Nobel Assembly at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm conferred the prestigious award on Dr. Joseph E. Murray, 71, of Boston's Brigham and Women's Hospital, and Dr. E. Donnall Thomas, 70, of the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle.
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NEWS
October 9, 1990 | ROBERT STEINBROOK and VICTOR F. ZONANA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Two American physicians who pioneered organ transplantation techniques that have helped save tens of thousands of patients were jointly awarded the Nobel Prize in medicine Monday. The Nobel Assembly at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm conferred the prestigious award on Dr. Joseph E. Murray, 71, of Boston's Brigham and Women's Hospital, and Dr. E. Donnall Thomas, 70, of the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle.
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NEWS
October 8, 1990 | From Associated Press
Two Americans--one who performed the first successful kidney transplant and one who pioneered bone marrow transplants--won the Nobel Prize in medicine today. Joseph E. Murray, 71, discovered how to master the problem of organ rejection and, in 1954, made the first successful organ transplant, a kidney from one identical twin to another that functioned for 24 years. The work of E. Donnall Thomas, 70, lessened the severe reaction that bone marrow transplants can cause in the recipients.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 2012 | Los Angeles Times staff and wire reports
E. Donnall Thomas, a physician who pioneered the use of bone marrow transplants in leukemia patients and won the 1990 Nobel Prize in medicine, died Saturday in Seattle of heart disease. He was 92. The Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, which Thomas joined in 1974, announced his death. Thomas' work is among the greatest success stories in the treatment of cancer. Bone marrow transplantation and its sister therapy, blood stem cell transplantation, have improved the survival rates for patients with some blood cancers to around 90% from almost zero.
NEWS
December 11, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
A Soviet deputy foreign minister accepted the Nobel Peace Prize on Monday on behalf of President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, who said in a message from Moscow that the world is still threatened by aggression and totalitarianism. Gorbachev, the first Communist head of state to win the prize, had hoped to attend the ceremony in Norway in person, but he said that problems at home--including a food shortage, a collapsing economy and breakaway republics--now require his attention "hour by hour."
BUSINESS
October 17, 1990 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three American economists, including a Stanford University professor whose work helped lay the foundation for creation of mutual funds and advanced the understanding of financial markets, were jointly awarded the Nobel memorial prize in economics Tuesday. Professors William F. Sharpe of Stanford, Harry F. Markowitz of City University of New York and Merton H. Miller of the University of Chicago, will share in the $700,000 prize from the Swedish Academy of Sciences.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 2012 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Special to The Times
Since ancient times, surgeons have dreamed of transplanting healthy organs into patients disabled by disease and injury, but the human body's powerful immune system stymied all such attempts, leading many observers to conclude that the procedure was impossible. But on Dec. 23, 1954, Dr. Joseph E. Murray of Peter Bent Brigham Hospital in Boston removed a healthy kidney from 23-year-old Ronald Herrick and implanted it in his identical twin, Richard, who was dying of severe kidney disease.
NEWS
June 13, 1990 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Every week last year, more than 30 livers and hearts were transplanted in the United States in operations that, quite literally, gave the patients months or years of extra life. Just eight years ago, only 62 livers and 103 hearts were transplanted during the entire year.
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