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Joseph E Seagram Sons Inc

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BUSINESS
March 29, 1989 | From Associated Press
Joseph E. Seagram & Sons Inc. said Tuesday that it will divest itself of trademark or sales and marketing rights to 17 brands of distilled spirits in the United States. Seagram, the U.S. subsidiary of Seagram Co. of Canada, said it decided to drop rights to the non-essential spirits last November. Terms of the deals were not disclosed. Seagram said in a statement that Heaven Hill Distilleries Inc. of Bardstown, Ky.
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BUSINESS
September 24, 1996 | DENISE GELLENE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In further defiance of a voluntary ban on TV commercials pitching distilled spirits, Joseph E. Seagram & Sons plans to air spots for two whiskey brands on a small number of independent stations around the country. In doing so, Seagram is disregarding a request from the White House, which in June called upon the industry to uphold the 48-year-old ban so that children and teenagers are not be exposed to liquor commercials.
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BUSINESS
August 7, 1989 | BRUCE KEPPEL, Times Staff Writer
The fizz has gone out of the sales of wine coolers, the beverage phenomenon that soaked up the glut of Central Valley grapes and once accounted for one of every five bottles of wine sold. What some hailed as a vibrant new category of wine beverage appears headed the way of such predecessor fads as Gallo's Cold Duck, Spanada and Boone's Farm--all fizzy-sweet drinks more akin to soda than wine.
BUSINESS
October 23, 1995 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An international incident is in the making, one that has serious people uttering the words intellectual property and Margarita in the same breath. On behalf of venerable Jose Cuervo and other distillers of tequila, the beverage extracted from the blue agave plant native to the small Mexico town of the same name, the Mexican government lodged a protest with U.S. trade officials this month over the sale of reputedly bogus Margarita coolers--that is, Margaritas without tequila.
BUSINESS
October 23, 1995 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An international incident is in the making, one that has serious people uttering the words intellectual property and Margarita in the same breath. On behalf of venerable Jose Cuervo and other distillers of tequila, the beverage extracted from the blue agave plant native to the small Mexico town of the same name, the Mexican government lodged a protest with U.S. trade officials this month over the sale of reputedly bogus Margarita coolers--that is, Margaritas without tequila.
BUSINESS
September 24, 1996 | DENISE GELLENE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In further defiance of a voluntary ban on TV commercials pitching distilled spirits, Joseph E. Seagram & Sons plans to air spots for two whiskey brands on a small number of independent stations around the country. In doing so, Seagram is disregarding a request from the White House, which in June called upon the industry to uphold the 48-year-old ban so that children and teenagers are not be exposed to liquor commercials.
BUSINESS
January 17, 1985
Joseph E. Seagram & Sons Inc., a distilled-spirits unit of the firm, said the reorganization is intended to reduce competition between Seagram brands and improve sales performance in the difficult U.S. market. The plan, which will go into effect Feb. 1, will result in "substantial" cutbacks in personnel. The company said it will attempt to find other jobs for the affected employees, who number about 200.
BUSINESS
August 7, 1989 | BRUCE KEPPEL, Times Staff Writer
The fizz has gone out of the sales of wine coolers, the beverage phenomenon that soaked up the glut of Central Valley grapes and once accounted for one of every five bottles of wine sold. What some hailed as a vibrant new category of wine beverage appears headed the way of such predecessor fads as Gallo's Cold Duck, Spanada and Boone's Farm--all fizzy-sweet drinks more akin to soda than wine.
BUSINESS
March 29, 1989 | From Associated Press
Joseph E. Seagram & Sons Inc. said Tuesday that it will divest itself of trademark or sales and marketing rights to 17 brands of distilled spirits in the United States. Seagram, the U.S. subsidiary of Seagram Co. of Canada, said it decided to drop rights to the non-essential spirits last November. Terms of the deals were not disclosed. Seagram said in a statement that Heaven Hill Distilleries Inc. of Bardstown, Ky.
BUSINESS
May 14, 1999 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Seagram Co., owner of Universal Studios and maker of Chivas Regal Scotch whiskey, will seek to raise as much as $2.5 billion to reduce its debt. The Montreal-based company will raise about $1.5 billion through the sale of common stock, according to a registration statement filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission. The other $1 billion will come from the sale of convertible equity units.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 2003 | Suzanne Muchnic, Times Staff Writer
The sale of Seagram's $15-million art collection got off to a strong start over the weekend with an auction of 720 photographs that brought $2.8 million -- well over the high estimate of $2.1 million -- at Phillips, de Pury & Luxembourg in New York. All the works were consigned by Vivendi Universal, the French entertainment conglomerate that acquired the 2,500-piece collection with its purchase of Joseph E. Seagram & Sons Inc. in late 2000, but is now liquidating $11.
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