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Joseph E Stiglitz

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NEWS
March 8, 1993 | SOMINI SENGUPTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stanford University economics professor Joseph E. Stiglitz has been named to the Council of Economic Advisers, his family said Sunday. Stiglitz's wife, Jane Hannaway, said her husband spoke with President Clinton last week, and was en route to Washington on Sunday night. Stiglitz, 50, widely known as an economic theorist, is a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution.
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BOOKS
March 30, 2008 | Kit R. Roane, Kit R. Roane is a journalist who has covered the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq.
The Iraq war seems no closer to resolution today than when it began five years ago. The daily stories of death, setbacks and gains bleed together like a list of mayhem on a police blotter, rarely jolting us anymore from our safe slumber back home. Two new books try to do just that by tallying the war's costs from these daily ledgers. Although each has a different focus, both accountings draw the same picture of hopelessness.
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BOOKS
March 30, 2008 | Kit R. Roane, Kit R. Roane is a journalist who has covered the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq.
The Iraq war seems no closer to resolution today than when it began five years ago. The daily stories of death, setbacks and gains bleed together like a list of mayhem on a police blotter, rarely jolting us anymore from our safe slumber back home. Two new books try to do just that by tallying the war's costs from these daily ledgers. Although each has a different focus, both accountings draw the same picture of hopelessness.
BOOKS
February 1, 2004 | Peter G. Gosselin, Peter G. Gosselin is a Times national economics correspondent based in Washington, D.C.
At any given time, there is a dominant line of argument about the great issues that face America. When it comes to the economy, that line is most often delivered by Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan.
BOOKS
February 1, 2004 | Peter G. Gosselin, Peter G. Gosselin is a Times national economics correspondent based in Washington, D.C.
At any given time, there is a dominant line of argument about the great issues that face America. When it comes to the economy, that line is most often delivered by Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan.
NEWS
June 29, 1995 | From Associated Press
President Clinton warned Republicans on Wednesday to work with him on a compromise budget-balancing plan or risk an autumn veto battle, raising the pressure on GOP lawmakers about to push their outline for tax and spending cuts through Congress. In identical letters to Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole (R-Kan.) and House Speaker Newt Gingrich (R-Ga.
NEWS
October 29, 1995 | From Associated Press
The Clinton Administration's offer to accept a temporary increase in the government's borrowing authority is getting a chilly reception from Republicans. The Administration said Friday it would accept a stopgap $85-billion boost in the nation's debt limit to keep the government operating through mid-January. Treasury Secretary Robert E. Rubin told Republican leaders he would be happy to discuss the idea. "That would take it into January, right?" Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole (R-Kan.
BUSINESS
August 23, 1996 | From Washington Post
American workers are losing jobs in company restructurings at a slower pace than in previous years, the Labor Department reported Thursday. From January 1993 to December 1995, 3.8 million workers lost a job they had held for three years or more for reasons relating to shifts in the U.S. economy, including plant closings or moves, the elimination of shifts and insufficient work to justify the job, according to a Bureau of Labor Statistics survey conducted in February. The number was down from 4.
BUSINESS
July 18, 2003 | From Bloomberg News
Joseph E. Stiglitz, who won the Nobel Prize in economics in 2001, testified Thursday that fellow laureates Myron S. Scholes and Robert C. Merton, both partners in now-defunct hedge fund Long-Term Capital Management, didn't know economic substance when they saw it. Stiglitz was testifying for the government in Long-Term Capital's suit against the Internal Revenue Service, which claims the fund should pay about $75 million in taxes and penalties for using an illegal tax shelter.
OPINION
July 27, 2012
Re "Level the playing field," Opinion, July 22 Joseph E. Stiglitz places much of the blame for weak economic growth and income inequality on "rent seeking" - activities focused on growing one's share of the pie rather than on growing the size of the pie itself. To the extent he is correct, it is a powerful argument in favor of a complete restructuring of our tax code, including the elimination of subsidies and loopholes. Tax breaks such as the mortgage interest deduction incentivize particular behaviors.
NEWS
March 8, 1993 | SOMINI SENGUPTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stanford University economics professor Joseph E. Stiglitz has been named to the Council of Economic Advisers, his family said Sunday. Stiglitz's wife, Jane Hannaway, said her husband spoke with President Clinton last week, and was en route to Washington on Sunday night. Stiglitz, 50, widely known as an economic theorist, is a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution.
OPINION
September 18, 2011 | By Linda J. Bilmes and Joseph E. Stiglitz
Ten years into the war on terror, the U.S. has largely succeeded in its attempts to destabilize Al Qaeda and eliminate its leaders. But the cost has been enormous, and our decisions about how to finance it have profoundly damaged the U.S. economy. Many of these costs were unnecessary. We chose to fight in Iraq and Afghanistan with a small, all-volunteer force, and we supplemented the military presence with a heavy reliance on civilian contractors. These decisions not only placed enormous strain on the troops but dramatically pushed up costs.
OPINION
October 14, 2001
At first, the signs were good that the administration's economic stimulus plan would be directed at individuals who needed fast relief. President Bush came in with a higher figure, $75 billion, than Congress had anticipated. Hard-line Republicans in Congress like Rep. Tom DeLay and Sen. Phil Gramm, both of Texas, fumed about Bush's failure to cater to big business. Now the president appears to be caving in.
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