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Joseph Eichler

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HOME & GARDEN
January 23, 2010 | By Eric Ducker
Brad Laner grew up in the San Fernando Valley in the 1970s, back when his neighborhood was called Sepulveda, not North Hills. The musician, formerly leader of the shoegaze band Medicine and now a solo artist, stayed true to his roots and in 2004 moved to Granada Hills with his wife and son, now 5. Legendary developer Joseph Eichler built their six-bedroom home here in 1964; after Laner's restoration, it stands as a tribute to Eichler's Modernist vision....
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NEWS
September 16, 2013 | By Lisa Boone
The Modernist tract homes designed by California developer Joseph Eichler feature light-filled interiors courtesy of atriums and expansive walls of glass, but the street-facing facades are often closed off like a fortress. "I think a lot about how our ideas are influenced by our environments," said artist Nate Page, who will screen nine short videos on the front of Eichler homes in the Balboa Highlands tract of Granada Hills on Thursday. "The psychological phenomenon of how we idealize modern living.
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MAGAZINE
January 14, 1996 | By Ned Eichler, This essay is adapted from "Eichler Homes: Design for Living," by Jerry Ditto and Lanning Stern, with photography by Marvin Wax, published this month by Chronicle Books
It was 1942, and I was just a kid when my father, Joseph Eichler, came home one night and announced that we were moving to a rented house designed by Frank Lloyd Wright. My father, who had no previous interest in art or architecture, ran a successful but uninspiring wholesale butter and egg business in the San Francisco area. Although our stay in the Wright house was temporary--the owner returned in a few years--it was clear that the experience had tapped some aesthetic yearning in him.
HOME & GARDEN
January 23, 2010 | By Eric Ducker
Brad Laner grew up in the San Fernando Valley in the 1970s, back when his neighborhood was called Sepulveda, not North Hills. The musician, formerly leader of the shoegaze band Medicine and now a solo artist, stayed true to his roots and in 2004 moved to Granada Hills with his wife and son, now 5. Legendary developer Joseph Eichler built their six-bedroom home here in 1964; after Laner's restoration, it stands as a tribute to Eichler's Modernist vision....
HOME & GARDEN
October 23, 1993 | LYNN O'DELL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The man who founded Eichler Homes building company was an egg and butter wholesaler who fell in love with a Frank Lloyd Wright house. When the egg and butter distributing company Joseph L. Eichler worked for was sold by his wife's family, Eichler found himself semi-retired in 1947 at the age of 47. Neither old enough nor rich enough to really retire, Eichler invested some money in a prefabricated housing company in Sunnyvale.
HOME & GARDEN
November 17, 2005
RE "The Once and Future Ranch" [Oct. 20]: The reason Joseph Eichler and Cliff May houses sold so well was because they were marvelous to be in and very moderately priced. I went through an Eichler house in Palo Alto recently that was in pristine shape. The home was as open and fresh today as it was when it was first built. Historical roots had little to do with it; the house was totally subservient to its design quality and price. Because the U.S. population has never had any design education, and rather than looking into what a house feels like to live in, people fall for every "new" style they think represents status, i.e. Tudor, McCastle, etc. SYD BROWN Los Osos, Calif.
HOME & GARDEN
March 9, 2006
I thoroughly enjoyed your Eichler story ["A Rousing Encore for the Eichlers," March 3]. My father and stepmother were the first buyers of the last seven homes that Joseph Eichler built in 1974. For this last subdivision in Los Altos, he did build two homes without an atrium. Ours was one of them. Instead of an atrium we had a huge great room with a double-sided fireplace. Shortly before our houses were finished, Mr. Eichler passed away and his son concluded the project. I do have a few memories of meeting Mr. Eichler during construction.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 14, 2008 | Joel Rubin
A caring neighbor His name was Ernest, but for some reason everyone knew him as Pete. A few called him Ernie. Ernest just seemed too formal for such a nice, friendly guy. Ernest Kish, 47, died Friday, one of the more than two dozen victims of the gruesome collision between a Metrolink commuter train and a freight train. Marcia Sheffield, a neighbor, remembered Kish as "a wonderful family man" and caring neighbor who recently went out of his way to look after an elderly neighbor who had fallen ill. Kish was the father of a young daughter and a teenage son, Sheffield said.
HOME & GARDEN
December 30, 1995
I was pleased to see the article on Joseph Eichler by Maresa Archer (Nov. 25), but there is one error to be noted. Mr. Eichler was not an architect, but an outstanding builder, who began his company in the San Francisco Bay Area in the middle 1950s. His principal architect was the late Claude Oakland. Mr. Eichler was not only an innovator as a builder, but a true believer in equal housing for all, turning no one away. This was during the time builders routinely put "Sold" signs on every new house in their tract as an easy way to discriminate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 2001 | DAVID PIERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Adriene Eng looked on the bright side of having a burst water main spew rocks and hundreds of gallons of water on her Eichler home in Granada Hills on Thursday. "This little disaster brought people together," she said. "All the neighbors are outside looking at our house." For the 44-year-old collector and seller of art deco objects, having the neighborhood appreciate her home was exactly what she wanted.
HOME & GARDEN
January 10, 2009 | Jeff Spurrier
When Cindy Epping and her partner, Harvey Horton, bought the Joseph Eichler-designed house in Granada Hills in 2007, the place was a mess. The front atrium -- an Eichler signature -- was a jungle of vines. The living room floor was covered in worn red shag carpeting, laid over fractured linoleum. The mahogany veneer on the walls and cabinetry throughout the house had been stained repeatedly to a muddy smear, and the fireplace had collapsed in an earthquake, sometime in the last century.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 14, 2008 | Joel Rubin
A caring neighbor His name was Ernest, but for some reason everyone knew him as Pete. A few called him Ernie. Ernest just seemed too formal for such a nice, friendly guy. Ernest Kish, 47, died Friday, one of the more than two dozen victims of the gruesome collision between a Metrolink commuter train and a freight train. Marcia Sheffield, a neighbor, remembered Kish as "a wonderful family man" and caring neighbor who recently went out of his way to look after an elderly neighbor who had fallen ill. Kish was the father of a young daughter and a teenage son, Sheffield said.
HOME & GARDEN
March 9, 2006
I thoroughly enjoyed your Eichler story ["A Rousing Encore for the Eichlers," March 3]. My father and stepmother were the first buyers of the last seven homes that Joseph Eichler built in 1974. For this last subdivision in Los Altos, he did build two homes without an atrium. Ours was one of them. Instead of an atrium we had a huge great room with a double-sided fireplace. Shortly before our houses were finished, Mr. Eichler passed away and his son concluded the project. I do have a few memories of meeting Mr. Eichler during construction.
HOME & GARDEN
November 17, 2005
RE "The Once and Future Ranch" [Oct. 20]: The reason Joseph Eichler and Cliff May houses sold so well was because they were marvelous to be in and very moderately priced. I went through an Eichler house in Palo Alto recently that was in pristine shape. The home was as open and fresh today as it was when it was first built. Historical roots had little to do with it; the house was totally subservient to its design quality and price. Because the U.S. population has never had any design education, and rather than looking into what a house feels like to live in, people fall for every "new" style they think represents status, i.e. Tudor, McCastle, etc. SYD BROWN Los Osos, Calif.
REAL ESTATE
September 23, 2001 | KATHY PRICE-ROBINSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Newlyweds Laurie and Phillip La Plante set out to buy and remodel their first home with different visions: She leans toward traditional, he likes modern; she warms to wood, he's into industrial metal. Incredibly, after a massive remodel and second-story addition to their 1959 Newport Beach bungalow, they both got what they wanted. The two-story house has the exterior lap siding and white trim reminiscent of an old-fashioned home.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 2001 | DAVID PIERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Adriene Eng looked on the bright side of having a burst water main spew rocks and hundreds of gallons of water on her Eichler home in Granada Hills on Thursday. "This little disaster brought people together," she said. "All the neighbors are outside looking at our house." For the 44-year-old collector and seller of art deco objects, having the neighborhood appreciate her home was exactly what she wanted.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 1997 | SHARON BERNSTEIN
The man credited with integrating housing in California suburbs did some of his best and most difficult work in the San Fernando Valley. Joseph Eichler, a Palo Alto builder who left his family's butter-and-egg business in 1947 to become a developer, quietly pioneered the concept of open housing beginning in the 1950s. Houses in his Balboa Hills development in Granada Hills were the first Valley homes outside Pacoima open to African American buyers.
MAGAZINE
February 25, 1996
Joseph Eichler was indeed an innovator, with a heavy assist from the architectural firm of Anshen & Allen ("Tract Stars," by Ned Eichler, Style, Jan. 14). The elder Eichler also may have set a trend in his use of model homes. He furnished them with a bare minimum of small-scale furniture in order to give the illusion of spaciousness. He also encouraged "lookers" to explore without being accompanied by a salesperson. Jack H. Carter Laguna Beach I feel that I've been lucky indeed to live in an Eichler home here in Southern California for 23 years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 2000 | KATIE COOPER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Tim Vick was running out of options. His Realtor was running out of patience. Every home she showed him was just too normal, he said. "I wanted something different--not some cookie-cutter house," said Vick, recounting his move to this east county city from Long Beach after a divorce nearly two years ago. Finally, he said, she told him about this unusual little fixer-upper off Lynn Road.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 1997 | SHARON BERNSTEIN
The man credited with integrating housing in California suburbs did some of his best and most difficult work in the San Fernando Valley. Joseph Eichler, a Palo Alto builder who left his family's butter-and-egg business in 1947 to become a developer, quietly pioneered the concept of open housing beginning in the 1950s. Houses in his Balboa Hills development in Granada Hills were the first Valley homes outside Pacoima open to African American buyers.
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