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Joseph Farah

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January 27, 2010 | By Peter Wallsten and Faye Fiore
Sipping coffee in a strip mall, Joseph Farah looks like something out of a spy novel -- suave, mysterious, bushy black mustache. He's surprisingly relaxed, considering he believes his life is in danger because of his occupation. He runs a must-read website for anyone who hates Barack Obama. Once a little-known Los Angeles newspaper editor, Farah has become a leading impresario of America's disaffected right, serving up a mix of reporting and wild speculation to an audience eager to think the worst of the president.
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NATIONAL
January 27, 2010 | By Peter Wallsten and Faye Fiore
Sipping coffee in a strip mall, Joseph Farah looks like something out of a spy novel -- suave, mysterious, bushy black mustache. He's surprisingly relaxed, considering he believes his life is in danger because of his occupation. He runs a must-read website for anyone who hates Barack Obama. Once a little-known Los Angeles newspaper editor, Farah has become a leading impresario of America's disaffected right, serving up a mix of reporting and wild speculation to an audience eager to think the worst of the president.
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NEWS
May 16, 1991 | WILLIAM TROMBLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Marybeth Bizjak moved from the San Francisco Chronicle to the Sacramento Union as feature editor a year ago, she thought she was supposed to "liven up the features--to put a little punch into that part of the paper." But 10 weeks later she was out of a job after running a story on the AIDS Memorial Quilt--a series of panels dedicated to those who have died of AIDS that has been traveling around the country. "My editor told me, 'You don't understand.
OPINION
March 7, 1993 | JOSEPH FARAH, Joseph Farah is editor of the cultural watchdog biweekly Dispatches and the political newsletter Inside California
He makes anti-capitalist movies but is building a 16,000-square-foot mansion on 1,200 acres in Colorado. He hates bourgeois America because it is against everything "progressive" but maintains four homes, all fully staffed and professionally decorated. He doesn't feel any guilt about his opulent lifestyle because "that's a Western Christian trip." You've heard of limousine liberals? Meet the first aristocratic anarchist--movie director Oliver Stone.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 14, 1992 | JOSEPH FARAH, Joseph Farah is vice president and editor-in-chief of Capital Publishing Inc. in Sacramento and editor of the cultural watchdog newsletter Between the Lines
Deeply depressed since she found out that she had terminal cancer, Marilyn thinks she has found a solution to the physical pain and the emotional ordeal. Her doctor has agreed to help Marilyn kill herself. No psychological evaluation of Marilyn will be necessary. No family members need to be consulted on this monumental and irreversible decision. No alternative approaches or treatment need to be discussed. This is, the law says, strictly a matter between doctor and patient.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 1992 | JOSEPH FARAH, Joseph Farah, former editor of the Sacramento Union, is executive director of the Western Journalism Center
Imagine the following hypothetical scenario: It's 1988, and George Bush has just been elected President. An oil industry executive and major contributor to the campaign announces that he has leased, at $8,000 a month, a mansion on the Gulf Coast of Texas for use by the new chief executive and his family anytime they want to "just kick back and relax for a few days." How do you suppose news reporters and other self-appointed ethics cops would react?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 1992 | JOSEPH FARAH, Joseph Farah, editor of the media-watch newsletter Between the Lines, writes about California political trends. The former editor of the Sacramento Union also serves as executive director of the Western Journalism Center.
Here's a little common-sense test: -- Imagine you run a small Jewish deli and you have an opening for a checkout cashier. In walks an applicant with a swastika tatooed prominently on his arm. Do you hire him? --Pretend you own a fast-food restaurant in a predominantly black neighborhood and you need a short-order cook. The most technically qualified person seeking the job is a skinhead fond of wearing a T-shirt emblazoned with the words "White Power." Does he get the job?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 1993 | JOSEPH FARAH, Joseph Farah is the editor of Inside California, a monthly political newsletter, and former editor of the Sacramento Union
When Bill Honig blames his indictment, trial and conviction on felony conflict-of-interest charges on a right-wing conspiracy, he probably means me. I was the editor of the only daily newspaper in the state that doggedly pursued the flagrant violations of the public trust by the California superintendent of schools until the attorney general's office finally began an investigation.
OPINION
March 7, 1993 | JOSEPH FARAH, Joseph Farah is editor of the cultural watchdog biweekly Dispatches and the political newsletter Inside California
He makes anti-capitalist movies but is building a 16,000-square-foot mansion on 1,200 acres in Colorado. He hates bourgeois America because it is against everything "progressive" but maintains four homes, all fully staffed and professionally decorated. He doesn't feel any guilt about his opulent lifestyle because "that's a Western Christian trip." You've heard of limousine liberals? Meet the first aristocratic anarchist--movie director Oliver Stone.
OPINION
May 10, 1992 | JOSEPH FARAH, Joseph Farah is editor in chief of New Dimensions magazine and founder-editor of Between the Lines, a media watchdog newsletter
A conservative is a liberal who got mugged, someone once said. If so, what happens to a liberal city that gets mugged? During the heat of the Los Angeles riots, some normally politically correct residents of the Hollywood Hills barricaded major entrances to their neighborhood with automobiles, patrolled the streets with AR-15s and handed out firearms to any law-abiding homeowner who would take one.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 1993 | JOSEPH FARAH, Joseph Farah is the editor of Inside California, a monthly political newsletter, and former editor of the Sacramento Union
When Bill Honig blames his indictment, trial and conviction on felony conflict-of-interest charges on a right-wing conspiracy, he probably means me. I was the editor of the only daily newspaper in the state that doggedly pursued the flagrant violations of the public trust by the California superintendent of schools until the attorney general's office finally began an investigation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 1992 | JOSEPH FARAH, Joseph Farah, former editor of the Sacramento Union, is executive director of the Western Journalism Center
Imagine the following hypothetical scenario: It's 1988, and George Bush has just been elected President. An oil industry executive and major contributor to the campaign announces that he has leased, at $8,000 a month, a mansion on the Gulf Coast of Texas for use by the new chief executive and his family anytime they want to "just kick back and relax for a few days." How do you suppose news reporters and other self-appointed ethics cops would react?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 14, 1992 | JOSEPH FARAH, Joseph Farah is vice president and editor-in-chief of Capital Publishing Inc. in Sacramento and editor of the cultural watchdog newsletter Between the Lines
Deeply depressed since she found out that she had terminal cancer, Marilyn thinks she has found a solution to the physical pain and the emotional ordeal. Her doctor has agreed to help Marilyn kill herself. No psychological evaluation of Marilyn will be necessary. No family members need to be consulted on this monumental and irreversible decision. No alternative approaches or treatment need to be discussed. This is, the law says, strictly a matter between doctor and patient.
OPINION
May 10, 1992 | JOSEPH FARAH, Joseph Farah is editor in chief of New Dimensions magazine and founder-editor of Between the Lines, a media watchdog newsletter
A conservative is a liberal who got mugged, someone once said. If so, what happens to a liberal city that gets mugged? During the heat of the Los Angeles riots, some normally politically correct residents of the Hollywood Hills barricaded major entrances to their neighborhood with automobiles, patrolled the streets with AR-15s and handed out firearms to any law-abiding homeowner who would take one.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 1992 | JOSEPH FARAH, Joseph Farah, editor of the media-watch newsletter Between the Lines, writes about California political trends. The former editor of the Sacramento Union also serves as executive director of the Western Journalism Center.
Here's a little common-sense test: -- Imagine you run a small Jewish deli and you have an opening for a checkout cashier. In walks an applicant with a swastika tatooed prominently on his arm. Do you hire him? --Pretend you own a fast-food restaurant in a predominantly black neighborhood and you need a short-order cook. The most technically qualified person seeking the job is a skinhead fond of wearing a T-shirt emblazoned with the words "White Power." Does he get the job?
NEWS
May 16, 1991 | WILLIAM TROMBLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Marybeth Bizjak moved from the San Francisco Chronicle to the Sacramento Union as feature editor a year ago, she thought she was supposed to "liven up the features--to put a little punch into that part of the paper." But 10 weeks later she was out of a job after running a story on the AIDS Memorial Quilt--a series of panels dedicated to those who have died of AIDS that has been traveling around the country. "My editor told me, 'You don't understand.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 1992
Thank you for trying to show both sides of the Clinton/Summerland issue (Column Left and Column Right, Dec. 1) but neither Tom Hayden nor Joseph Farah revealed anything more than their dedication to the polarization between ultra-liberals and ultra-conservatives, which the electorate clearly rejected on Nov. 3. I strongly supported and voted for George Bush, but I see nothing wrong with Bill Clinton's acceptance of the Thomasons' largess....
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 1993
Joseph Farah's "Oliver Stone: Far From the Malibu Crowd" (Column Right, March 7) is another calculated slander of the man, so typical of the right-wing pundits that fill every issue of The Times. The misrepresentation begins with the first four words "he makes anti-capitalist movies." The rest of the article builds on this false assumption. I have seen all of Oliver Stone's movies and would not characterize them as "anti-capitalist." My guess is that when he created "Wall Street," he probably felt, as I do, that the junk-bond speculation and leveraged buyouts that pillaged the financial community--and ultimately the taxpayers--and destroyed our manufacturing base, did not remotely resemble capitalism as theorized by Adam Smith, hence deserving of criticism.
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