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Joseph Force Crater

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 2005 | Cecilia Rasmussen, Times Staff Writer
Gold prospector "Lucky Blacky" Blackiet walked into Los Angeles Police Department headquarters in 1936 and claimed he'd hit the mother lode in the lost-and-found department. While riding his burro near Julian, Calif., he said, he had run into the most hunted man in the country: New York state Supreme Court Judge Joseph Force Crater. Blackiet told police that he had "swapped yarns" with the jurist, who told him his name and said: "In one more year, I will be legally dead.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 2005 | Cecilia Rasmussen, Times Staff Writer
Gold prospector "Lucky Blacky" Blackiet walked into Los Angeles Police Department headquarters in 1936 and claimed he'd hit the mother lode in the lost-and-found department. While riding his burro near Julian, Calif., he said, he had run into the most hunted man in the country: New York state Supreme Court Judge Joseph Force Crater. Blackiet told police that he had "swapped yarns" with the jurist, who told him his name and said: "In one more year, I will be legally dead.
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NATIONAL
October 2, 2012 | By Michael Muskal
Jimmy Hoffa -- the legendary labor leader -- is still missing, authorities said Tuesday after tests failed to detect any human remains in a sample dug up from a suburban Detroit driveway. The negative results mean that Hoffa's final resting place still ranks with such notable mysteries as the whereabouts of aviator Amelia Earhart and the disappearance of Judge Joseph Force Crater . All have become fodder for theorists seeking to resolve unexplained endings. Scientists at Michigan State University recently tested two samples cored from the ground beneath a driveway in Roseville, Mich., as part of an investigation prompted by a tip from an unidentified man who said he thought he saw a body being buried beneath a driveway years ago. The tests came back negative, according to police.
NEWS
January 9, 1994 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Oscar Fraley, the onetime sports reporter whose high-spirited chronicling of "The Untouchables" spawned a hugely successful TV series and two feature films, has died. He was 79. Fraley died after stomach surgery Thursday night in Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., his wife, Imogene, said Saturday.
NEWS
August 13, 1995 | ELLEN WULFHORST, REUTERS
You can come back now, Judge Crater. Everybody's dead. Sixty-five years ago, on Aug. 6, New York State Judge Joseph Force Crater caught a cab in midtown Manhattan and completely vanished. His disappearance captured the imagination of America, mired in the Great Depression and has never entirely let go. Groucho Marx joked he was going to "step out and look for Judge Crater," while nightclub comedians quipped, "Judge Crater, please call your office."
NEWS
July 25, 2001 | REED JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He vanished five months ago after a cookout at his mother's home, a 33-year-old African American male in blue jeans and red Nikes. He smoked Newports and Marlboros, the authorities noted, and sported a tattoo on his right arm with the mantra, "Live by the sword, die by the sword." Now Gerald Leander Betts stares glumly out from the missing-persons Web site of the Metropolitan Nashville Police Department. A mute statistic. A son and brother mysteriously gone AWOL.
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