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Joseph H Duff

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 1989 | TERRY PRISTIN, Times Staff Writer
As the vitriolic campaign for the presidency of the Los Angeles NAACP chapter entered its final hours Saturday, incumbent Anthony M. Essex lashed out at his opponent, attorney Joseph H. Duff, accusing him of slander and of damaging the organization's reputation. Essex, who at 31 is the youngest person ever to head the NAACP chapter, charged that Duff is "not dealing with items of substance, but choosing to focus on past events in my life that are . . .
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 1993 | BILL BOYARSKY
Long after the Reginald O. Denny beating trial has ended, anger will continue to seethe and a debate will continue to rage over a central controversy in the case--whether blacks and Latinos are treated unfairly by a justice system run by whites. Anyone who has visited the Downtown court buildings or the judicial outposts in the suburbs is aware of the color of the bench. Less than 10% of Los Angeles County Superior Court judges are black. There aren't many Latinos, either.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 1989 | PAUL FELDMAN, Times Staff Writer
After an acrimonious campaign, attorney Joseph H. Duff has defeated controversial incumbent Anthony M. Essex for the presidency of the Los Angeles NAACP chapter by a 494 to 307 tally, the civil rights organization announced Monday. Duff, who gained prominence through his work in the Los Angeles school desegregation case, said his overwhelming victory showed "there is a lot of interest in the NAACP. . . . This is the largest turnout since the 1960s."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 1993 | JOHN L. MITCHELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles branch of the NAACP has become embroiled in a controversy over comments made by its president comparing the beating of trucker Reginald O. Denny to the actions of "a lynch mob." Joseph H. Duff, who heads the local chapter of the National Assn. for the Advancement of Colored People, caused the stir when he made the politically charged comparison in an interview just as the trial of two men accused in last year's attack on Denny was about to begin.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 1993 | JOHN L. MITCHELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles branch of the NAACP has become embroiled in a controversy over comments made by its president comparing the beating of trucker Reginald O. Denny to the actions of "a lynch mob." Joseph H. Duff, who heads the local chapter of the National Assn. for the Advancement of Colored People, caused the stir when he made the politically charged comparison in an interview just as the trial of two men accused in last year's attack on Denny was about to begin.
NEWS
April 6, 1989 | CAROL McGRAW, Times Staff Writer
Elnora Crowder liked to ease into her Saturdays after a week of teaching school. But on this particular day in 1963 she got up early and headed for Watts, a journey that would leave a lasting mark on the public schools of Los Angeles. When Crowder approached some teen-agers in a park, "They actually recoiled from me saying, 'Blacks go to a white school?' " she recalls. "It was like I was asking them to go to the moon."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 29, 1991 | RICH CONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles Ethics Commission on Friday agreed to seek quick-fix legislation to close a gaping loophole in the city's new conflict of interest code that protects most top city managers and political aides from being penalized for violating the law. Meeting amid a new wave of controversies and complaints over the voter-approved ethics reforms, the commission ordered the drafting of a corrective ordinance to ensure that criminal and civil penalties can be imposed on key City Hall employees.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 1993 | BILL BOYARSKY
Long after the Reginald O. Denny beating trial has ended, anger will continue to seethe and a debate will continue to rage over a central controversy in the case--whether blacks and Latinos are treated unfairly by a justice system run by whites. Anyone who has visited the Downtown court buildings or the judicial outposts in the suburbs is aware of the color of the bench. Less than 10% of Los Angeles County Superior Court judges are black. There aren't many Latinos, either.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 1989 | GINGER THOMPSON, Times Staff Writer
A congregation of nearly 800 gathered at Hamilton United Methodist Church on Sunday, but the crowd was not there to pray. Their minds were on things of this world--the election of a president of the Los Angeles branch of the NAACP and what the new leader would do about job opportunities, fair housing and poor living conditions in the black community.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 1990
Representatives of the Los Angeles NAACP and civil rights groups met Monday with an official from the Japanese Consulate to protest remarks by a Japanese government minister who compared black Americans to prostitutes. Protesters demanded the resignation of Justice Minister Seiroku Kajiyama, whose remarks last week, after the arrests of foreign women allegedly working as prostitutes in Tokyo, created a stir.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 29, 1991 | RICH CONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles Ethics Commission on Friday agreed to seek quick-fix legislation to close a gaping loophole in the city's new conflict of interest code that protects most top city managers and political aides from being penalized for violating the law. Meeting amid a new wave of controversies and complaints over the voter-approved ethics reforms, the commission ordered the drafting of a corrective ordinance to ensure that criminal and civil penalties can be imposed on key City Hall employees.
NEWS
April 6, 1989 | CAROL McGRAW, Times Staff Writer
Elnora Crowder liked to ease into her Saturdays after a week of teaching school. But on this particular day in 1963 she got up early and headed for Watts, a journey that would leave a lasting mark on the public schools of Los Angeles. When Crowder approached some teen-agers in a park, "They actually recoiled from me saying, 'Blacks go to a white school?' " she recalls. "It was like I was asking them to go to the moon."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 1989 | PAUL FELDMAN, Times Staff Writer
After an acrimonious campaign, attorney Joseph H. Duff has defeated controversial incumbent Anthony M. Essex for the presidency of the Los Angeles NAACP chapter by a 494 to 307 tally, the civil rights organization announced Monday. Duff, who gained prominence through his work in the Los Angeles school desegregation case, said his overwhelming victory showed "there is a lot of interest in the NAACP. . . . This is the largest turnout since the 1960s."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 1989 | GINGER THOMPSON, Times Staff Writer
A congregation of nearly 800 gathered at Hamilton United Methodist Church on Sunday, but the crowd was not there to pray. Their minds were on things of this world--the election of a president of the Los Angeles branch of the NAACP and what the new leader would do about job opportunities, fair housing and poor living conditions in the black community.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 1989 | TERRY PRISTIN, Times Staff Writer
As the vitriolic campaign for the presidency of the Los Angeles NAACP chapter entered its final hours Saturday, incumbent Anthony M. Essex lashed out at his opponent, attorney Joseph H. Duff, accusing him of slander and of damaging the organization's reputation. Essex, who at 31 is the youngest person ever to head the NAACP chapter, charged that Duff is "not dealing with items of substance, but choosing to focus on past events in my life that are . . .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 26, 1993 | STEPHANIE CHAVEZ and HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
An influential coalition of civil rights advocates, black and Latino activists and politicians vowed Monday to fight what they view as a racially divisive campaign to break up the mammoth Los Angeles Unified School District. About 45 people, including clergy, educators and parents, gathered on the steps of City Hall and decried the effort led by state Sen. David A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 1989 | ELAINE WOO, Times Education Writer
Ending an often bitter 26-year legal battle, a federal judge in Los Angeles on Monday dismissed the last remaining defendant in a class-action lawsuit to desegregate the Los Angeles Unified School District. U.S. District Judge A. Wallace Tashima dropped the state Department of Education and Supt. of Public Instruction Bill Honig from the suit at the request of the National Assn. for the Advancement of Colored People, which said it could not afford to continue pressing the case.
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