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Joseph Hansen

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 2004 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
Joseph Hansen, a Southern California novelist and poet best known for his groundbreaking mystery series featuring Los Angeles insurance claims investigator Dave Brandstetter, the first major gay protagonist in the mystery genre, has died. He was 81. Hansen, an activist for sexual rights who wrote for pioneering gay magazines, died Nov. 24 at his home in Laguna Beach, said a family member. The cause was heart failure due to a long respiratory illness.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 2004 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
Joseph Hansen, a Southern California novelist and poet best known for his groundbreaking mystery series featuring Los Angeles insurance claims investigator Dave Brandstetter, the first major gay protagonist in the mystery genre, has died. He was 81. Hansen, an activist for sexual rights who wrote for pioneering gay magazines, died Nov. 24 at his home in Laguna Beach, said a family member. The cause was heart failure due to a long respiratory illness.
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December 12, 1993 | Kevin Thomas, Kevin Thomas is a Times staff writer
Joseph Hansen's fans have mourned the passing of his Dave Brandstetter mysteries, those gems of graceful description and characterization that capture the idiosyncrasies of life in Southern California from a gay perspective. We can always hope that Hansen will be moved to devise a way of bringing Brandstetter back, but in the meantime there's consolation in the form of his new novel, "Living Upstairs," which could just lead to a new series.
BOOKS
March 5, 1995 | Kevin Thomas, Kevin Thomas is a Times film writer.
When Joseph Hansen's "Living Upstairs" was published in late 1993, fans who mourned the passing of his Dave Branstetter private-eye series were cheered by this novel, which introduced us to 20-year-old struggling writer Nathan Reed, who was in the throes of a first love while living in side-street Hollywood in 1943.
BOOKS
March 5, 1995 | Kevin Thomas, Kevin Thomas is a Times film writer.
When Joseph Hansen's "Living Upstairs" was published in late 1993, fans who mourned the passing of his Dave Branstetter private-eye series were cheered by this novel, which introduced us to 20-year-old struggling writer Nathan Reed, who was in the throes of a first love while living in side-street Hollywood in 1943.
BOOKS
July 17, 1988 | Dick Roraback, Roraback is a Times staff writer who likes to read short stories but couldn't write one if it bit him on the Bohannon.
At least on those disposable TV shows there are faces to watch, some of them even interesting. Joseph Hansen provides no such relief. Hansen's shortish stories, laid side by side like so many red herrings, are little more than print versions of an eternity of private-eye series, a resemblance of things past. "Five Mysteries" the stories are euphemistically called, and they revolve about one central conundrum: Who cares? Hack Bohannon seems to, though even he is suspect.
NEWS
April 19, 1990 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Twenty years ago Joseph Hansen did something revolutionary. He wrote a mystery whose protagonist was tough, smart and gay. The book, called "Fadeout," featured an insurance investigator named David Brandstetter. Like Philip Marlowe and a dozen other modern American sleuths, Brandstetter was a decent, courageous man working the mean streets. But on good nights, when the gunplay was over, Brandstetter went home to another man.
BOOKS
December 12, 1993 | Kevin Thomas, Kevin Thomas is a Times staff writer
Joseph Hansen's fans have mourned the passing of his Dave Brandstetter mysteries, those gems of graceful description and characterization that capture the idiosyncrasies of life in Southern California from a gay perspective. We can always hope that Hansen will be moved to devise a way of bringing Brandstetter back, but in the meantime there's consolation in the form of his new novel, "Living Upstairs," which could just lead to a new series.
NEWS
April 19, 1990 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Twenty years ago Joseph Hansen did something revolutionary. He wrote a mystery whose protagonist was tough, smart and gay. The book, called "Fadeout," featured an insurance investigator named David Brandstetter. Like Philip Marlowe and a dozen other modern American sleuths, Brandstetter was a decent, courageous man working the mean streets. But on good nights, when the gunplay was over, Brandstetter went home to another man.
BOOKS
July 17, 1988 | Dick Roraback, Roraback is a Times staff writer who likes to read short stories but couldn't write one if it bit him on the Bohannon.
At least on those disposable TV shows there are faces to watch, some of them even interesting. Joseph Hansen provides no such relief. Hansen's shortish stories, laid side by side like so many red herrings, are little more than print versions of an eternity of private-eye series, a resemblance of things past. "Five Mysteries" the stories are euphemistically called, and they revolve about one central conundrum: Who cares? Hack Bohannon seems to, though even he is suspect.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 1998 | ROBERT DAWIDOFF, Robert Dawidoff is a professor of history at Claremont Graduate University. He is writing a book about the history of gay men in American civilization
This Sunday morning, the 28th annual Gay and Lesbian Pride Parade will take fabulous flight along Santa Monica Boulevard between Crescent Heights and San Vicente. The weekend's events commemorate the 1969 Stonewall Uprising in New York City, when patrons at a Greenwich Village gay bar fought back against routine police harassment and sparked the gay liberation movement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 2004 | Nancy Cleeland, Times Staff Writer
Hoping to inject new energy into the long-running California grocery strike, labor leaders laid out a national support campaign Saturday at a boisterous rally outside an empty, heavily guarded Vons supermarket in Inglewood. Actions -- including large demonstrations marked by civil disobedience -- were promised in a dozen cities from Seattle to Baltimore, and a national boycott was promoted, as leaders try to increase the financial pain of the grocery chains involved in the dispute.
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