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Joseph Haydn

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February 19, 1987 | HERBERT GLASS
Christopher Hogwood gave the illusion of being on home territory for the occasion of his Tuesday evening concert at Ambassador Auditorium, Pasadena. He was, after all, appearing with his band of British period specialists, the Academy of Ancient Music. But there was that telltale word, conductor, after his name. In the old days the title was director.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 1995 | Herbert Glass, Herbert Glass is a regular contributor to Calendar.
Conductors have been mouthing off for at least the past two decades about Joseph Haydn, the great undiscovered or unappreciated composer, the implication being that they would unfold before us Haydn's Classical wonders, and do it as a tonic for musicians and listeners grown slothful on a diet of late-Romantic excess. But it's usually just talk. Even our own Esa-Pekka Salonen, one of the most sympathetic Haydn conductors in the business, has promised L.A. lots and delivered very little.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 1992 | HERBERT GLASS, Herbert Glass is a regular contributor to Calendar.
The first recording by the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra in some years of a program of symphonies by Joseph Haydn--and the first under its new music director Christof Perick (Dorian 90168)--is not to be welcomed simply as an expression of local boosterism or as just another solid addition to the already sizable Haydn discography.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 1994 | Herbert Glass, Herbert Glass is a regular contributor to Calendar
The thought expressed in this column on an earlier occasion, that the best conductor for some music is no conductor at all, applies again in a pair of Deutsche Grammophon CDs documenting the conductorless Orpheus Chamber Orchestra's latest, happy encounters with symphonies of Joseph Haydn.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 1991 | HERBERT GLASS, Herbert Glass is a regular contributor to The Times.
Joseph Haydn, Mozart's favorite composer, has prospered during the latter's nominal big year. And with the recording industry's characteristic--inevitably suicidal--overkill, Haydn, whose music still steadfastly refuses to sell, is running a not-that-close but still-unprecedented strong second to Mozart in sheer volume of recordings released this year.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 1994 | Herbert Glass, Herbert Glass is a regular contributor to Calendar
The thought expressed in this column on an earlier occasion, that the best conductor for some music is no conductor at all, applies again in a pair of Deutsche Grammophon CDs documenting the conductorless Orpheus Chamber Orchestra's latest, happy encounters with symphonies of Joseph Haydn.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 1987 | HERBERT GLASS
The period-performance fraternity--the artists, their presenters, whether in the concert hall or on recordings, and their audiences--is growing up. Merely playing on old instruments, quickly, without vibrato and at lowered pitch, is no longer taken as a guarantee of authenticity--or of sales. The recordings are fewer and better, an indication that the fad phase is drawing to a close and being replaced by a serious search for quality.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 1995 | Herbert Glass, Herbert Glass is a regular contributor to Calendar.
Conductors have been mouthing off for at least the past two decades about Joseph Haydn, the great undiscovered or unappreciated composer, the implication being that they would unfold before us Haydn's Classical wonders, and do it as a tonic for musicians and listeners grown slothful on a diet of late-Romantic excess. But it's usually just talk. Even our own Esa-Pekka Salonen, one of the most sympathetic Haydn conductors in the business, has promised L.A. lots and delivered very little.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 1993 | HERBERT GLASS
To judge by the enthusiastic reception given last month to the largest concentrated dose of orchestral Haydn in local memory--performances on the same weekend by the Los Angeles Philharmonic and the Los Angeles Mozart Orchestra--the question might arise whether the time is finally coming for this seemingly most accessible of composers. Esa-Pekka Salonen led the Los Angeles Philharmonic in a program containing two symphonies, "The Philosopher" and "Drum Roll."
NEWS
January 25, 2007 | From the Associated Press
After a yearlong jubilee celebrating Mozart's 250th birthday, classical music fans can expect another series of concerts and festivals to mark two centuries since the death of Franz Joseph Haydn. The highlight of the yearlong event will take place on May 31, 2009, the 200th anniversary of Haydn's death, with worldwide performances of his masterpiece "The Creation," organizers said Wednesday at a news conference in Vienna.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 1993 | HERBERT GLASS
To judge by the enthusiastic reception given last month to the largest concentrated dose of orchestral Haydn in local memory--performances on the same weekend by the Los Angeles Philharmonic and the Los Angeles Mozart Orchestra--the question might arise whether the time is finally coming for this seemingly most accessible of composers. Esa-Pekka Salonen led the Los Angeles Philharmonic in a program containing two symphonies, "The Philosopher" and "Drum Roll."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 1992 | HERBERT GLASS, Herbert Glass is a regular contributor to Calendar.
The first recording by the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra in some years of a program of symphonies by Joseph Haydn--and the first under its new music director Christof Perick (Dorian 90168)--is not to be welcomed simply as an expression of local boosterism or as just another solid addition to the already sizable Haydn discography.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 1991 | HERBERT GLASS, Herbert Glass is a regular contributor to The Times.
Joseph Haydn, Mozart's favorite composer, has prospered during the latter's nominal big year. And with the recording industry's characteristic--inevitably suicidal--overkill, Haydn, whose music still steadfastly refuses to sell, is running a not-that-close but still-unprecedented strong second to Mozart in sheer volume of recordings released this year.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 1987 | HERBERT GLASS
Christopher Hogwood gave the illusion of being on home territory for the occasion of his Tuesday evening concert at Ambassador Auditorium, Pasadena. He was, after all, appearing with his band of British period specialists, the Academy of Ancient Music. But there was that telltale word, conductor, after his name. In the old days the title was director.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 1987 | HERBERT GLASS
The period-performance fraternity--the artists, their presenters, whether in the concert hall or on recordings, and their audiences--is growing up. Merely playing on old instruments, quickly, without vibrato and at lowered pitch, is no longer taken as a guarantee of authenticity--or of sales. The recordings are fewer and better, an indication that the fad phase is drawing to a close and being replaced by a serious search for quality.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 1991 | PSYCHE PASCUAL
A 13-year-old Thousand Oaks youth who won a Young Pianist Award will be guest soloist with the Conejo Youth Symphony next month. Jeff Paul, an eighth-grade student at Redwood Intermediate School, competed against about 10 other Conejo Valley youths at a competition sponsored by the symphony in February. Jeff will play a piano concerto by Franz Joseph Haydn at a symphony performance at 8 p.m. June 7 at the First Christian Church, 301 W. Avenida de los Flores.
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