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Joseph Horowitz

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April 26, 1987 | Herbert Glass, Glass, who is senior editor of Performing Arts magazine, writes the On the Record column for the Sunday Calendar.
Joseph Horowitz, who gave us the excellent "Conversations With Arrau" in 1983, has set himself a more difficult task here: writing a "fair" assessment from an essentially negative bias of Arturo Toscanini, the Italian conductor (1867-1957) who played such a crucial role in shaping American attitudes toward "serious" music during his three decades of power in this country.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 2005 | Chris Pasles
Bucking the trend of putting CDs in new books about music and dance, Joseph Horowitz chose a different option for his "Classical Music in America: A History of Its Rise and Fall." To hear some of the music he discusses, he refers readers to his publisher's website: www.wwnorton.com/catalog/fall04/005717.htm. "The website option gives us more playing time than we could possibly archive on a CD," Horowitz says.
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November 18, 1990 | Chris Goodrich
THE IVORY TRADE: Music and the Business of Music at the Van Cliburn International Piano Competition by Joseph Horowitz (Summit Books: $21.95; 290 pp.) . Former New York Times music critic Joseph Horowitz could well have titled his fascinating new book "The Politics of Music."
BOOKS
March 20, 2005 | Joseph Kerman, Joseph Kerman, professor emeritus of music at UC Berkeley, is the author of many books, including "Opera as Drama," "Concerto Conversations" and the forthcoming "The Art of Fugue."
The decline of classical music, often announced in the news media, sometimes in obituary terms, has long been a reliable trigger for lamentation or schadenfreude, as the case may be. It is therefore not surprising that Joseph Horowitz should cast his impressive chronicle, "Classical Music in America," in a rigid framework of its rise and fall.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 2005 | Chris Pasles
Bucking the trend of putting CDs in new books about music and dance, Joseph Horowitz chose a different option for his "Classical Music in America: A History of Its Rise and Fall." To hear some of the music he discusses, he refers readers to his publisher's website: www.wwnorton.com/catalog/fall04/005717.htm. "The website option gives us more playing time than we could possibly archive on a CD," Horowitz says.
BOOKS
March 20, 2005 | Joseph Kerman, Joseph Kerman, professor emeritus of music at UC Berkeley, is the author of many books, including "Opera as Drama," "Concerto Conversations" and the forthcoming "The Art of Fugue."
The decline of classical music, often announced in the news media, sometimes in obituary terms, has long been a reliable trigger for lamentation or schadenfreude, as the case may be. It is therefore not surprising that Joseph Horowitz should cast his impressive chronicle, "Classical Music in America," in a rigid framework of its rise and fall.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2002 | Chris Pasles
The Pacific Symphony has announced details of two chamber music concerts to complete its "Dvorak in America" festival, April 17-25 at the Orange County Performing Arts Center in Costa Mesa. On April 20 at 3 p.m., pianist Robert Thies, Pacific Symphony musicians and festival artistic consultant and Dvorak scholar Joseph Horowitz will explore American Indian musical influences on the composer. On April 21 at 7:30 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 2000
IRVINE 5:30pm Music Pacific Symphony's Copland Festival officially opens with a reception, dinner, panel discussion and screening of William Wyler's 1949 film "The Heiress." Copland won an Academy Award for his score for this film. The panel discussing the film and the music will include composer David Raksin, music scholar David Schiff, festival advisor and author Joseph Horowitz, and Pacific music director Carl St.Clair. * Arnold and Mabel Beckman Center, 100 Academy, Irvine. 5:30 p.m.
NEWS
February 8, 2007 | Diane Haithman
PACIFIC Symphony's 2007 American Composers Festival, "Los Sonidos de Mexico," will seek to prove that there is more to Mexican music than mariachi by focusing on the roots of Mexican classical music, the Orange County organization announced Wednesday.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 2004 | Daniel Cariaga, Special to The Times
Compelling recent music by Chinese American composers Chen Yi, Joan Huang and Zhou Long made up the backbone of the second concert in the Pacific Symphony's monthlong 2004 American Composers Festival, Sunday night in Founders Hall at the Orange County Performing Arts Center. Dramatic and urgent, these pieces represent the fusion of their writers' cross-cultural training and environments.
BOOKS
November 18, 1990 | Chris Goodrich
THE IVORY TRADE: Music and the Business of Music at the Van Cliburn International Piano Competition by Joseph Horowitz (Summit Books: $21.95; 290 pp.) . Former New York Times music critic Joseph Horowitz could well have titled his fascinating new book "The Politics of Music."
BOOKS
April 26, 1987 | Herbert Glass, Glass, who is senior editor of Performing Arts magazine, writes the On the Record column for the Sunday Calendar.
Joseph Horowitz, who gave us the excellent "Conversations With Arrau" in 1983, has set himself a more difficult task here: writing a "fair" assessment from an essentially negative bias of Arturo Toscanini, the Italian conductor (1867-1957) who played such a crucial role in shaping American attitudes toward "serious" music during his three decades of power in this country.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 2000 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By universal assent, Aaron Copland can be called the composer who put American music on the map. So, to celebrate his 100th birthday (Nov. 14) and his influence on other composers, the Pacific Symphony has announced a wide-ranging Copland Festival, Nov. 12-19. The festival will take place in various venues and include orchestra and chamber music concerts, panel discussions and screenings of three films scored by Copland plus a contemporary film that uses his music posthumously.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 1991 | GRETA BEIGEL
"Entartete Musik," occupying all three floors of the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, is open during evening hours to concert patrons of the Los Angeles Philharmonic, and to the public Thursdays through Saturdays from 1-5 p.m. There are a number of performances, exhibits and related events in Los Angeles examining the fates of the "degenerate" musicians.
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