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Joseph Isgro

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 2007 | Chuck Philips, Times Staff Writer
BEFORE Tony Soprano or Don Corleone or Tony Montana there was Lucky Luciano -- the real-life patriarch of modern organized crime. Luciano was the Sicilian immigrant who rose to power in the Mafia in the U.S. in the 1920s and transformed it into a flourishing enterprise based on legitimate economic models. He ordered gangland killings, consolidated warring crime factions and began laundering profits from narcotics and prostitution through lawful businesses. Criminals paid attention.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 6, 2007 | Chuck Philips, Times Staff Writer
BEFORE Tony Soprano or Don Corleone or Tony Montana there was Lucky Luciano -- the real-life patriarch of modern organized crime. Luciano was the Sicilian immigrant who rose to power in the Mafia in the U.S. in the 1920s and transformed it into a flourishing enterprise based on legitimate economic models. He ordered gangland killings, consolidated warring crime factions and began laundering profits from narcotics and prostitution through lawful businesses. Criminals paid attention.
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BUSINESS
December 14, 1990 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Breaking his silence over his recent payola trial, Joseph Isgro--the nation's best-known record promoter--said he hopes the release of a federal judge's opinion criticizing government prosecutors' conduct in the case will erase any "lingering doubts" about his innocence. Isgro's remarks came after U.S. District Judge James M.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 2000 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former record promoter Joseph Isgro was sentenced to 50 months in federal prison Thursday for running a loan-sharking business outside a Beverly Hills shopping center. Isgro, who spent most of 1990s fending off federal payola and racketeering charges, was accused of lending money at 5% interest a week to people in financial distress and using subordinates to threaten those who fell behind in their payments. U.S. District Judge Audrey B.
BUSINESS
August 29, 1990 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
As prosecutors pursued their payola trial against former record promoter Joseph Isgro, a former Isgro lieutenant and key government witness admitted Tuesday in U.S. District Court that he has re-entered the promotion business, handling some of the labels that Isgro represented in his heyday.
NEWS
December 4, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Service Reports
A one-time major independent record promoter and one of his business associates pleaded innocent in federal court in Los Angeles today to charges stemming from a cash and cocaine payola scam. Joseph Isgro, 42, who has promoted records by such artists as Michael Jackson, Bruce Springsteen and David Bowie, entered his innocent plea to 51 counts, including racketeering, conspiracy to defraud five record companies and making undisclosed payola payments to radio stations.
BUSINESS
December 5, 1989 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joseph Isgro, once one of the nation's leading independent record promoters, pleaded not guilty Monday in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles to a 51-count indictment filed against him last week stemming from a three-year probe into "payola" in the record industry.
BUSINESS
August 22, 1990 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Potential jurors gathered in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles were told Tuesday to expect a long and highly publicized proceeding as the government opened the racketeering and payola trial of one of the most powerful and controversial record promoters of the 1980s: Joseph Isgro. Judge James M. Ideman warned potential jurors that the case would probably run more than a month and attract intense news coverage.
BUSINESS
August 31, 1990 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal judge in Los Angeles said Thursday that he will decide over the Labor Day weekend whether to dismiss the biggest payola trial in 30 years and bring an end to the government's case against former record promoter Joseph Isgro and two other defendants due to claims that prosecutors improperly withheld key documents. "What is clear is that there has been a violation," said U.S. District Judge James M. Ideman. "Material that should have been turned over long ago was not turned over. . . .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 2000 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A tiny extortion ring operating in the heart of Beverly Hills is tied to the biggest organized crime family in New York, government prosecutors alleged Friday. Prosecutors say Joseph Isgro, a Tarzana record executive arrested last week by federal agents, is a "soldier" for the Gambino crime family who has been running a "violent" extortion and loan-sharking operation since 1994. Citing an FBI affidavit, prosecutors said Isgro is one of 192 identifiable members of the Gambino clan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 2000 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Music promoter Joseph Isgro, the target of a failed federal prosecution in a 1980s payola scandal, was arrested Saturday on loan sharking and extortion charges, the U.S. attorney's office said Monday. Isgro, 52, was taken into custody in front of Le Grand Passage shopping center in Beverly Hills, a location that he and his associates often used for confrontations with debtors in arrears, authorities said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 1999 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seven years ago, an unknown singer named Babydol announced her arrival in Hollywood with a giant billboard overlooking the Sunset Strip. Positioned directly below the legendary Marlboro Man, the 25-foot-tall ad was designed to spark sales of the sultry diva's debut single: a self-penned dance track called "Good Girls Go to Heaven, Bad Girls Go Everywhere." It didn't work. The song bombed. The billboard vanished.
BUSINESS
December 14, 1990 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Breaking his silence over his recent payola trial, Joseph Isgro--the nation's best-known record promoter--said he hopes the release of a federal judge's opinion criticizing government prosecutors' conduct in the case will erase any "lingering doubts" about his innocence. Isgro's remarks came after U.S. District Judge James M.
BUSINESS
September 7, 1990 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal judge's abrupt dismissal this week of the biggest music payola and racketeering trial in 30 years highlights a textbook example of government bungling and could make it much harder to prosecute future cases of alleged payola or other wrongdoing in the music industry, experts say.
BUSINESS
August 31, 1990 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal judge in Los Angeles said Thursday that he will decide over the Labor Day weekend whether to dismiss the biggest payola trial in 30 years and bring an end to the government's case against former record promoter Joseph Isgro and two other defendants due to claims that prosecutors improperly withheld key documents. "What is clear is that there has been a violation," said U.S. District Judge James M. Ideman. "Material that should have been turned over long ago was not turned over. . . .
BUSINESS
September 7, 1990 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal judge's abrupt dismissal this week of the biggest music payola and racketeering trial in 30 years highlights a textbook example of government bungling and could make it much harder to prosecute future cases of alleged payola or other wrongdoing in the music industry, experts say.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 1999 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seven years ago, an unknown singer named Babydol announced her arrival in Hollywood with a giant billboard overlooking the Sunset Strip. Positioned directly below the legendary Marlboro Man, the 25-foot-tall ad was designed to spark sales of the sultry diva's debut single: a self-penned dance track called "Good Girls Go to Heaven, Bad Girls Go Everywhere." It didn't work. The song bombed. The billboard vanished.
BUSINESS
August 29, 1990 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
As prosecutors pursued their payola trial against former record promoter Joseph Isgro, a former Isgro lieutenant and key government witness admitted Tuesday in U.S. District Court that he has re-entered the promotion business, handling some of the labels that Isgro represented in his heyday.
BUSINESS
August 22, 1990 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Potential jurors gathered in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles were told Tuesday to expect a long and highly publicized proceeding as the government opened the racketeering and payola trial of one of the most powerful and controversial record promoters of the 1980s: Joseph Isgro. Judge James M. Ideman warned potential jurors that the case would probably run more than a month and attract intense news coverage.
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