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Joseph J Cicippio

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NEWS
September 24, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Pro-Iranian kidnapers in Lebanon said they would release British hostage Jack Mann within 48 hours. Mann, 77, was kidnaped in March, 1989. The statement by the Revolutionary Justice Organization was delivered to the Beirut newspaper An Nahar along with a photograph of U.S. hostage Joseph J. Cicippio, who was seized Sept. 12, 1986. The statement praised U.N.
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NEWS
October 15, 1992 | From Associated Press
Former hostages Joseph Cicippio and David Jacobsen sued Iran on Wednesday for $600 million, saying it orchestrated their abductions in an effort to recover millions of dollars frozen in the United States. Iran was guilty of "commercial terrorism for profit," lawyer James J. Oliver said, and because the money was held in the United States, Iran cannot claim sovereign immunity. The two former hostages said no amount of money can compensate for their imprisonment.
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NEWS
December 1, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
Pro-Iranian Lebanese kidnapers said today that they will release American hostage Joseph J. Cicippio in 48 hours. "The Revolutionary Justice Organization announces that it will release the American Joseph Cicippio in 48 hours," the group said in a statement. The Arabic-language communique was accompanied by a photograph of Cicippio, 61, of Valley Forge, Pa. He had a bushy, graying beard.
NEWS
October 15, 1992 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former hostages David P. Jacobsen and Joseph J. Cicippio said they filed a lawsuit Wednesday seeking $600 million of Iran's frozen assets on the grounds its government sponsored "commercial terrorism." "Our lawsuit is significant because it's a matter of principle more than money," said Jacobsen of Huntington Beach. "It's not just Joe Cicippio and I on this. If there are any judgments, we hope to share that with the other ex-hostages." The civil suit was filed in U.S.
NEWS
September 21, 1986 | Associated Press
American hostage David P. Jacobsen, in a videotape broadcast Saturday, said he is upset that he is still a captive in Lebanon after the release of a U.S. reporter jailed in Moscow. Jacobsen, one of five Americans believed held by Islamic extremists, said the Reagan Administration is interested in the case of correspondent Nicholas Daniloff but not his, CBS News reported. The network obtained the videotape Saturday, spokeswoman Ramona Dunn said.
NEWS
December 4, 1991 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
During his nearly 2,000 days as a hostage, Joseph J. Cicippio appears to have suffered one of the most arduous ordeals of all Westerners held captive by Muslim fundamentalist groups in Lebanon, according to initial medical assessments Tuesday. Although Cicippio was judged to be basically in sound health after medical examinations, a senior physician here said he was the first former hostage to suffer permanent physical damage as a result of his captivity. At a medical briefing, Air Force Col.
NEWS
August 3, 1989 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
Defiant of possible U.S. military action in Lebanon's hostage crisis, radical Muslim clergymen warned Wednesday that any American strike would be answered with unrestrained retaliation. Sheik Abbas Musawi, an extremist leader of the fundamentalist, pro-Iranian Hezbollah organization, declared that "America should think a million times before carrying out any foolish action." Musawi told a Western news agency in Beirut, "There would be no limits whatsoever to our reprisal."
NEWS
July 13, 1987 | Associated Press
Lt. Col. Oliver L. North and others were aware that the arms-for-hostages program may have contributed to the seizure of Americans in Lebanon as well as the release of three U.S. hostages, documents show. North, during his testimony at the congressional Iran- contra hearings last week, defended selling U.S.-made weapons to Tehran on the grounds that three men were freed, and "there was no terrorism while we were engaged in (the deal) until it started to come unraveled."
NEWS
December 3, 1991 | OSWALD JOHNSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Joseph J. Cicippio was ambushed and kidnaped by gunmen at the American University of Beirut five years ago, the only traces left behind were bloodstains from a pistol-whipping and a pair of broken eyeglasses. Both were evidence, friends said, that the strong-willed Pennsylvanian had put up a good fight. And they were not surprised. "Joe Cicippio was not the sort of guy to go quietly," a colleague then told reporters in Beirut.
NEWS
August 2, 1989 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
A death threat against American hostage Joseph J. Cicippio was suspended for 48 hours Tuesday night in response to "friendly appeals" and an emotional plea by his Lebanese wife, Cicippio's kidnapers announced in Beirut. The terrorists holding the 58-year-old university controller, who has been a hostage for nearly three years, had threatened to set an execution date for him if an Israeli-held fundamentalist Muslim leader was not set free by 6 p.m. Tuesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 1, 1992 | EDMUND NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Somebody up there must like the Rose Parade. A rainstorm that has been brewing out in the Pacific for several days won't get here until Thursday, giving the annual band-and-floats extravaganza today its 37th straight year without precipitation, forecasters say. "It looks like a dry day tomorrow," WeatherData meteorologist Steve Burback said Tuesday, adding that temperatures should reach the low 70s today. The WeatherData service provides forecasts to The Times.
NEWS
December 6, 1991 | TYLER MARSHALL and TAMARA JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Thursday may have dawned dull and gray in this old German spa town, but for newly released hostage Terry A. Anderson, it was the start of a sweet new life--his first full day of freedom in more than 6 1/2 years. In an atmosphere filled with relief and celebration, the families of the last three American hostages to be freed in the Mideast tasted the simplest of joys that no money can buy.
NEWS
December 5, 1991 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a U.S. military hospital here waited to welcome Terry A. Anderson, the last American held captive in Lebanon, physicians Wednesday delivered a troubling medical report on one of the two Americans freed earlier this week. Air Force Col. Uwe Fohlmeister, director of hospital services at the Wiesbaden Medical Center, reported that the newly released hostage Alann Steen had sustained slight but permanent brain damage from a beating he received from his captors roughly four years ago.
NEWS
December 4, 1991 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
During his nearly 2,000 days as a hostage, Joseph J. Cicippio appears to have suffered one of the most arduous ordeals of all Westerners held captive by Muslim fundamentalist groups in Lebanon, according to initial medical assessments Tuesday. Although Cicippio was judged to be basically in sound health after medical examinations, a senior physician here said he was the first former hostage to suffer permanent physical damage as a result of his captivity. At a medical briefing, Air Force Col.
NEWS
December 3, 1991 | OSWALD JOHNSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Joseph J. Cicippio was ambushed and kidnaped by gunmen at the American University of Beirut five years ago, the only traces left behind were bloodstains from a pistol-whipping and a pair of broken eyeglasses. Both were evidence, friends said, that the strong-willed Pennsylvanian had put up a good fight. And they were not surprised. "Joe Cicippio was not the sort of guy to go quietly," a colleague then told reporters in Beirut.
NEWS
December 3, 1991 | OSWALD JOHNSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After more than five years of waiting, Thomas Cicippio received the call just after 4 a.m. Monday. It was the State Department, with official confirmation that the captors of his brother Joseph finally had made good on their promise to let him go. Thomas, 68, a retired postal worker who still lives in the family hometown of Norristown, Pa., had been his brother's unofficial spokesman ever since he was taken captive in Beirut on Sept. 12, 1986.
NEWS
August 5, 1989 | DAVID LAUTER and ROBIN WRIGHT, Times Staff Writers
Bush Administration officials Friday welcomed conciliatory statements by Iran's new president but warned that apparent openings to Tehran in the past repeatedly have proven illusory. "When you see a statement that offers hope for the return of our hostages, I want to explore it to the fullest," Bush said in response to Iranian President Hashemi Rafsanjani's offer to help find "solutions" to the five-year hostage crisis. But, Bush added, "I don't know what--what it means fully."
NEWS
August 7, 1989 | DON SHANNON, Times Staff Writer
Israel will not free Shiite Muslim leader Sheik Abdel Karim Obeid unless three captive Israeli soldiers are included in any hostage exchange deal negotiated with Shiite militants, Israeli Defense Minister Yitzhak Rabin said Sunday. Rabin, rejecting any suggestion of a partial hostage exchange, said in an interview on CBS' "Face the Nation" that the release of the three Israeli soldiers is the "first priority" to be achieved in negotiations with their Lebanese captors.
NEWS
December 3, 1991 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr. and TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Looking frail and unsteady, Joseph J. Cicippio--the American hostage who more than once thought death would come to him during his five years of captivity in Beirut--was freed Monday and arrived at a U.S. military hospital here later in the day for medical treatment. The 61-year-old university administrator smiled and waved as he acknowledged the applause from service personnel who gathered amid an array of American flags on a balcony overlooking the main entrance to the U.S.
NEWS
December 2, 1991 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Israel on Sunday released 25 Arab prisoners held by its client militia in southern Lebanon, and hours later, Lebanese kidnapers said they will free American hostage Joseph J. Cicippio this morning in Beirut. Israel's Defense Ministry announced that the South Lebanon Army, its proxy security force along the border, released the Arab captives from Khiam prison in response to a request from U.N. Secretary General Javier Perez de Cuellar for a "personal gesture."
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