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NEWS
June 21, 2001 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two days after Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Joseph J. Ellis admitted lying about his service in Vietnam to decades of Mount Holyoke College students, the small women's school in Western Massachusetts announced Wednesday that Ellis would no longer teach his signature course on Vietnam and American culture. With the campus in a state of "total shock," according to dean of faculty Donal O'Shea, school administrators would not discuss the possibility of disciplinary action.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2010 | By Annette Gordon-Reed, Special to the Los Angeles Times
First Family Abigail & John Adams Joseph J. Ellis Alfred A. Knopf: 304 pp., $27.95 John and Abigail Adams are the most well-known, most-written-about couple in America's Revolutionary generation. Why? Because they left such a well-constructed paper trail. The exigencies of John's careers as a revolutionary, diplomat and politician kept the pair apart for long stretches of their 54-year marriage. While that was not so good for them, it was a blessing for historians, as the often-great distance required them to communicate on paper.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2010 | By Annette Gordon-Reed, Special to the Los Angeles Times
First Family Abigail & John Adams Joseph J. Ellis Alfred A. Knopf: 304 pp., $27.95 John and Abigail Adams are the most well-known, most-written-about couple in America's Revolutionary generation. Why? Because they left such a well-constructed paper trail. The exigencies of John's careers as a revolutionary, diplomat and politician kept the pair apart for long stretches of their 54-year marriage. While that was not so good for them, it was a blessing for historians, as the often-great distance required them to communicate on paper.
BOOKS
November 7, 2004 | Nicholas Meyer, Nicholas Meyer is a writer-director whose movie credits include "The Seven-Percent Solution." He most recently wrote the screenplay for "The Human Stain."
As the United States of America -- like the Roman republic before it -- makes the slippery transition to Empire, it is understandable that its citizens have lost their identity. Those old enough to remember the republic are old enough to care; the younger, ignorant of our origins, blandly trade in their citizenship for attention-challenged consumerism or religion.
BOOKS
March 2, 1997 | BENJAMIN SCHWARZ, Benjamin Schwarz is executive editor of World Policy Journal
Over the past 25 years historians and pundits have attacked Thomas Jefferson on several fronts. They have criticized his stance on issues ranging from civil liberties to states' rights to the French Revolution and have, above all, castigated him for his pseudo-scientific racism and his belief that there was no place for free black people in American society.
BOOKS
April 29, 2001 | ERIC FONER, Eric Foner is DeWitt Clinton professor of history at Columbia University, a past president of the Organization of American Historians and the author of numerous books, including "The Story of American Freedom."
The American Revolution and the longevity of the political system it created appear in retrospect so inevitable that we sometimes forget what remarkable achievements they actually were. No republican government had ever before consolidated its authority over so vast a geographical area. The statesmen of the revolutionary generation deserve enormous credit for the success of the American experiment in nation-building and self-government. This, at least, is Joseph J.
BOOKS
November 7, 2004 | Nicholas Meyer, Nicholas Meyer is a writer-director whose movie credits include "The Seven-Percent Solution." He most recently wrote the screenplay for "The Human Stain."
As the United States of America -- like the Roman republic before it -- makes the slippery transition to Empire, it is understandable that its citizens have lost their identity. Those old enough to remember the republic are old enough to care; the younger, ignorant of our origins, blandly trade in their citizenship for attention-challenged consumerism or religion.
OPINION
July 1, 2001
I am intrigued by the double standard that seems to be at play in the public dialogue about professor Joseph J. Ellis (June 22). Do we expect so little honesty from our political leaders that we routinely laud President Reagan despite his lying to us about the actions of his administration (e.g., Iran-Contra)? Do we expect so little forthrightness that we accept President Bush's refusal to answer questions about his young adult life? Where do we draw the line on the importance of honesty and forthrightness?
OPINION
February 1, 2010
Howard Zinn died last week. Since 1980, his controversial "A People's History of the United States" has sold more than 2 million copies, and it has given Zinn -- a professor, social activist, shipyard worker and World War II bombardier -- his own shot at being more than a footnote in the march of time. Marjorie Miller Marjorie Miller interviewed his colleagues to start history's assessment. Sean Wilentz Princeton University, "The Age of Reagan: A History, 1974-2008" What he did was take all of the guys in white hats and put them in black hats, and vice versa.
BOOKS
December 14, 2003
To the Editor: Mr. Joseph J. Ellis' amiable review of my "Inventing a Nation" [Nov. 16] is troubling, if only as an example of current bookchat. He tells us right off that there are "a boatload of factual errors (the claim for instance that Washington was broke in 1786)." Although I am writing straight history, I don't use footnotes, but whenever I make a statement about Washington's finances, say, I follow it up with evidence; in this case, from Washington himself. "My living under the best economy I can use must unavoidably be expensive."
NEWS
June 21, 2001 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two days after Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Joseph J. Ellis admitted lying about his service in Vietnam to decades of Mount Holyoke College students, the small women's school in Western Massachusetts announced Wednesday that Ellis would no longer teach his signature course on Vietnam and American culture. With the campus in a state of "total shock," according to dean of faculty Donal O'Shea, school administrators would not discuss the possibility of disciplinary action.
BOOKS
April 29, 2001 | ERIC FONER, Eric Foner is DeWitt Clinton professor of history at Columbia University, a past president of the Organization of American Historians and the author of numerous books, including "The Story of American Freedom."
The American Revolution and the longevity of the political system it created appear in retrospect so inevitable that we sometimes forget what remarkable achievements they actually were. No republican government had ever before consolidated its authority over so vast a geographical area. The statesmen of the revolutionary generation deserve enormous credit for the success of the American experiment in nation-building and self-government. This, at least, is Joseph J.
BOOKS
March 2, 1997 | BENJAMIN SCHWARZ, Benjamin Schwarz is executive editor of World Policy Journal
Over the past 25 years historians and pundits have attacked Thomas Jefferson on several fronts. They have criticized his stance on issues ranging from civil liberties to states' rights to the French Revolution and have, above all, castigated him for his pseudo-scientific racism and his belief that there was no place for free black people in American society.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 2001
Re "Top Historian Becomes Tangled in Fictions," June 19: I was a student at UCLA during the height of the Vietnam protests. Contrary to popularly held opinions, no one I knew ever had a single negative comment about the soldiers fighting the war. Rather, all anger was directed at a government that would so willingly sacrifice its young men in such a venture. For Pulitzer winner Joseph J. Ellis to fabricate an extensive history of his own service in that war is far beyond a "mistake." It is a body blow to the memory of every soldier who has served his country, much less paid with his life.
OPINION
May 10, 2012
Re "A tale of two narratives," Opinion, May 6 Historian Joseph J. Ellis writes that conservatives were the central feature of the founding of the United States. But using the dictionary definition of "liberals" as being open to change and reform, it's obvious the opposite is true. The conservatives of 1776 were loyalists who fought with the British. The French, Russian and American revolutions were all the work of liberals to escape oppressive governments and to start new, democratic systems.
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