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Joseph Jamail

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BUSINESS
August 2, 1993 | TERRI LANGFORD, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Attorney Joseph Jamail plays his own straight man when asked why--after a victorious $3-billion settlement with Texaco Inc.--he still goes to work. "I'm a very egotistical person," said Jamail, sitting with colleagues in the Holiday Inn lounge in this resort town where he's battling another big corporation, American Airlines, in a high-stakes courtroom brawl. "I'm vain. And I just want to be part of the process," Jamail said. "I think I'm doing some good. Obviously I don't need any more money.
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BUSINESS
August 2, 1993 | TERRI LANGFORD, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Attorney Joseph Jamail plays his own straight man when asked why--after a victorious $3-billion settlement with Texaco Inc.--he still goes to work. "I'm a very egotistical person," said Jamail, sitting with colleagues in the Holiday Inn lounge in this resort town where he's battling another big corporation, American Airlines, in a high-stakes courtroom brawl. "I'm vain. And I just want to be part of the process," Jamail said. "I think I'm doing some good. Obviously I don't need any more money.
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BUSINESS
December 13, 1985 | DEBRA WHITEFIELD, Times Staff Writer
Solomon Casseb Jr., Richard B. Miller and Joseph Jamail Jr. have been known in South Texas for years as prominent lawyers, moving in important social and political circles. But now they are suddenly thrust onto the national stage, thanks to the biggest civil case in U.S. history--Pennzoil vs. Texaco. Until three weeks ago, the 23-month-long legal dispute over Houston-based Pennzoil's contention that Texaco improperly lured Getty Oil out of a merger deal last year drew little attention.
BUSINESS
December 13, 1985 | DEBRA WHITEFIELD, Times Staff Writer
Solomon Casseb Jr., Richard B. Miller and Joseph Jamail Jr. have been known in South Texas for years as prominent lawyers, moving in important social and political circles. But now they are suddenly thrust onto the national stage, thanks to the biggest civil case in U.S. history--Pennzoil vs. Texaco. Until three weeks ago, the 23-month-long legal dispute over Houston-based Pennzoil's contention that Texaco improperly lured Getty Oil out of a merger deal last year drew little attention.
NEWS
September 30, 1994 | Reuters
Treasury Secretary Lloyd Bentsen has purchased a house in Houston for "considerably more" than $500,000, a spokesman said Thursday. Bentsen bought the townhouse in the upscale Tanglewood section, which is also home to former President George Bush, from lawyer Joseph Jamail, the spokesman said. The house has six bedrooms and six bathrooms.
BUSINESS
October 2, 1989 | From Times wire services
A Houston lawyer best known for representing Pennzoil in its marathon court battle with Texaco was the nation's highest-paid lawyer in 1988, making between $450 million and $600 million, according to a Forbes Magazine survey released today. Joseph Jamail headed the list of 134 highest-paid lawyers in the country who together made an imposing $860 million in 1988.
BUSINESS
March 24, 1987
In papers filed with the Texas Court of Appeals, Texaco purports to show new evidence that the original trial judge in its $12-billion battle with Pennzoil was biased against Texaco and its chief trial lawyer, Richard B. Miller. Texaco alleged earlier that the judge, Anthony J. P. Farris, favored Pennzoil, saying that he accepted a $10,000 campaign contribution from Pennzoil's leading counsel, Joseph D. Jamail Jr. Farris was forced off the case by illness and later died.
BUSINESS
February 13, 1987 | DONALD WOUTAT, Times Staff Writer
A Texas appeals court Thursday trimmed $2 billion from the record $10.53-billion damage award against Texaco but upheld the basic 1985 jury verdict that Texaco had wrongfully interfered with Pennzoil's plan to merge with Getty Oil three years ago. The unanimous ruling by the special three-judge appeals panel wasn't considered a surprise, but Texaco attacked it as "absurd," "appalling" and "outrageous" and reiterated that it would appeal the case to the U.S. Supreme Court if necessary.
BUSINESS
August 11, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A federal jury Tuesday cleared American Airlines of allegations that it tried to force rivals Continental and Northwest out of business last year by slashing fares in an unprecedented price war. Deliberating less than three hours, the jury in Galveston, Tex., said it failed to get past the first of six test questions posed by U.S. District Judge Samuel Kent: whether American intended to monopolize certain airline markets with its cut-rate fares.
BUSINESS
June 20, 1992 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Six chemical companies and a real estate developer have agreed to buy a Houston neighborhood and pay for the college educations of 700 children who live there in what is believed to be the largest settlement of lawsuits over a toxic waste dump in U.S. history. Children with severe illnesses, such as leukemia and birth defects, will receive millions of dollars each. In all, the developer, the chemical concerns and their insurers will pay $207.
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