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Joseph Jarman

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October 5, 2006 | Josef Woodard, Special to The Times
NORMALLY, when Roscoe Mitchell and Joseph Jarman appear on the same bill, they are working under the umbrella identity of the Art Ensemble of Chicago, the legendary, category-smashing group formed in 1969. But when the veteran saxophonists (and multi-instrumentalists) appear in a rare double-bill at the Ford Amphitheatre on Sunday, part of the experimental "sound." concert series, they'll leave the ensemble at home and play in solo and duet formats, mixing structured and purely improvised music.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 2012 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
There are two works that illustrate the range of Fontella Bass' singing power. One is a gut-busting soul cry, “Rescue Me,” a propellant R&B banger from 1965 that became Bass' signature. The other, equally vital, is a nine-minute thrill ride, “Theme de Yoyo,” which drives funk and boundary-busting jazz through one instrumental climax after another on the classic 1970 album “Les Stances a Sophie” from the Art Ensemble of Chicago. Any appreciation of Bass, who died at 72 in her hometown of St. Louis on Wednesday, must first acknowledge these two pieces of music.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 2012 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
There are two works that illustrate the range of Fontella Bass' singing power. One is a gut-busting soul cry, “Rescue Me,” a propellant R&B banger from 1965 that became Bass' signature. The other, equally vital, is a nine-minute thrill ride, “Theme de Yoyo,” which drives funk and boundary-busting jazz through one instrumental climax after another on the classic 1970 album “Les Stances a Sophie” from the Art Ensemble of Chicago. Any appreciation of Bass, who died at 72 in her hometown of St. Louis on Wednesday, must first acknowledge these two pieces of music.
NEWS
October 5, 2006 | Josef Woodard, Special to The Times
NORMALLY, when Roscoe Mitchell and Joseph Jarman appear on the same bill, they are working under the umbrella identity of the Art Ensemble of Chicago, the legendary, category-smashing group formed in 1969. But when the veteran saxophonists (and multi-instrumentalists) appear in a rare double-bill at the Ford Amphitheatre on Sunday, part of the experimental "sound." concert series, they'll leave the ensemble at home and play in solo and duet formats, mixing structured and purely improvised music.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 1998 | BILL KOHLHAASE
Over some three decades, the Art Ensemble of Chicago--saxophonists Roscoe Mitchell and Joseph Jarman, trumpeter Lester Bowie, bassist Malachi Favors and percussionist Don Moye--has created the perfect blend of individual voice and collective interplay. Operating under the banner of "Great Black Music, From the Ancient to the Future," the ensemble has ranged over time and space, bringing avant-garde sensibilities and a rich percussive mix to early hot-jazz, hard bop, funk and reggae.
NEWS
March 14, 2002 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The performance by the ensemble Equal Interest at the Skirball Cultural Center on Tuesday night explored a largely undefined musical territory. Appealing to avant-jazzers as well as edgy classicists, it is a creative land in which musical definitions are determined on the spot by individual practitioners.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 2000 | VICTORIA LOOSELEAF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The mood of the audience in the late afternoon at the Electric Lodge in Venice on Sunday was that of a group of people relieved to be in out of the rain. Whether they all were sucked into "the hours of the season," a 60-minute improvisational performance by butoh master Oguri, percussionist Adam Rudolph, saxman Joseph Jarman and poet Robert Wisdom is doubtful: Titters, shushing and the bleating of a cell phone periodically broke the mesmerizing effect Oguri usually has on his acolytes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Malachi Favors, a jazz bassist known for his long association with the avant-garde Art Ensemble of Chicago, died Jan. 30 in Chicago of pancreatic cancer, relatives told the Associated Press. He was 76. The Art Ensemble of Chicago's performances were a mixture of music, theatricality and humor that combined traditional elements of jazz and blues, West African music, chanting, ritual, abstract sounds and, often, silence.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 1990 | DON SNOWDEN
"Our music is primarily intended to stimulate thought, to get people to make new rationales," said Art Ensemble of Chicago trumpeter Lester Bowie. "We come from jazz, blues and everything, but we're about establishing sort of a new reality on that, relating to those forms in a different way. "We're creating a music that people of the world can relate to. Jazz served as a link to all these forms because jazz gives a foundation that develops your ears."
NEWS
December 21, 2006 | Kevin Bronson
Still having fun with 'the sharks' In the face of travails large and small, the party goes on for Scissors for Lefty. The Bay Area quartet's synthesizer- infused dance-pop (maybe Panic! at the Disco for people who've read a few of the classics) drips with wit and brims with energy -- the sound of four guys having a good time.
NEWS
November 11, 1999 | DON HECKMAN and JON THURBER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Trumpeter Lester Bowie, a preeminent member of the avant-garde expressionist movement in jazz, has died of liver cancer at the age of 58. Bowie died Monday night at his home in Brooklyn, N.Y. One of the few trumpeters of his generation to adapt to the techniques of free jazz, Bowie was an integral force in mid-1960s Chicago for the expression of the adventurous new ideas sweeping through the music.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 2009 | Ramie Becker
This Saturday, while the Sunset Strip Music Festival rolls out various forms of pop music, a completely different idea of radical sound will be heard all over Los Angeles, stretching and blurring the boundaries of music and noise and art. The Society for the Activation of Social Space through Art and Sound (SASSAS) is celebrating 10 years of experimental sounds and artist collaborations by staging an all-day (and completely free) concert series, leading its participants through various L.A. neighborhoods and concert venues.
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