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Joseph Kanon

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2005 | Dick Lochte, Special to The Times
"ALIBI," Joseph Kanon's new novel of crime and consequence, is set in Venice, Italy, less than a year after the end of World War II, a historic milestone that apparently weighs heavily in the author's mind. His fiction debut, "Los Alamos," took place in the waning days of the war, involving a mysterious murder that threatened the Manhattan Project.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2005 | Dick Lochte, Special to The Times
"ALIBI," Joseph Kanon's new novel of crime and consequence, is set in Venice, Italy, less than a year after the end of World War II, a historic milestone that apparently weighs heavily in the author's mind. His fiction debut, "Los Alamos," took place in the waning days of the war, involving a mysterious murder that threatened the Manhattan Project.
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NEWS
June 30, 1997 | MICHAEL HARRIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's the spring of 1945, and in a jerry-built compound on a mesa in Los Alamos, N.M., the scientists assembled for the top-secret Manhattan Project are feverishly working to build the first atomic bomb. When a security officer is found murdered in nearby Santa Fe, the U.S. government can take no chances.
BOOKS
October 7, 2001 | ANDREW NAGORSKI, Andrew Nagorski was Newsweek's Berlin bureau chief from 1996 to 1999. Now a senior editor at Newsweek International, he is completing a novel about the early days of the Nazi movement
Berlin in the 20th century was a gift to writers. The more desperate, wild and debauched the city was, the more sinister and full of intrigue, the greater the raw material for those who used it as the setting for their fiction. In "The Berlin Stories," Christopher Isherwood immortalized the city of the late 1920s and early 1930s, reveling in its decadence and producing amoral, likable characters like Sally Bowles, who would later reappear in the stage musical and film "Cabaret."
NEWS
March 22, 1999 | MICHAEL J. YBARRA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In 1969, Joseph Kanon visited some buddies from Cambridge University who were working at the British Embassy in Prague. He found one of Europe's most elegant cities covered in soot. But the mood among people was even more glum. Just the year before, Soviet tanks had rolled into the country and crushed Czechoslovakia's effort to create "socialism with a human face." People walked outside for private conversations to escape the reach of listening devices.
NEWS
January 18, 1999 | JONATHAN LEVI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's Forgive-and-Forget Week in America. Last week, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences voted unanimously to give an honorary Oscar to Elia Kazan, who, nearly 50 years ago, in a single appearance before the House Committee on Un-American Activities, destroyed the careers of several fellow artists, including actor Morris Carnovsky and playwright Clifford Odets. While Hollywood might want to stuff the evil genies of the Cold War and Sen.
BOOKS
October 7, 2001 | ANDREW NAGORSKI, Andrew Nagorski was Newsweek's Berlin bureau chief from 1996 to 1999. Now a senior editor at Newsweek International, he is completing a novel about the early days of the Nazi movement
Berlin in the 20th century was a gift to writers. The more desperate, wild and debauched the city was, the more sinister and full of intrigue, the greater the raw material for those who used it as the setting for their fiction. In "The Berlin Stories," Christopher Isherwood immortalized the city of the late 1920s and early 1930s, reveling in its decadence and producing amoral, likable characters like Sally Bowles, who would later reappear in the stage musical and film "Cabaret."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 2012
Panel: Crime Fiction: Listening In When: April 22, 3:30 p.m. Where: Seeley G. Mudd building on the USC campus Who: Panelists Joseph Kanon, Philip Kerr and Steinhauer; moderated by Paula L. Woods Information: http://events.latimes.com/festivalofbooks/
BOOKS
February 11, 2007 | Susan Salter Reynolds
Get out your slide rules: There must be some formula to predict the number of years before traumatic historical events become the stuff of fiction. The last decade has witnessed an increasing number of novels featuring Albert Einstein, Robert Oppenheimer, the Manhattan Project and the events at Los Alamos. Some of our favorites include Marianne Wiggins' "Evidence of Things Unseen," Lydia Millet's "Oh Pure and Radiant Heart," Jean-Claude-Carriere's "Please, Mr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 1997
Reality and fiction have coincided in recent weeks to remind Americans that the major nuclear powers still have at their fingertips the ability to destroy life on Earth many times over. According to a report from the National Academy of Scientists, "significant portions of U.S. and Russian nuclear forces are maintained in a continuous state of alert." The Cold War may be over but so-called nuclear readiness is not.
NEWS
March 22, 1999 | MICHAEL J. YBARRA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In 1969, Joseph Kanon visited some buddies from Cambridge University who were working at the British Embassy in Prague. He found one of Europe's most elegant cities covered in soot. But the mood among people was even more glum. Just the year before, Soviet tanks had rolled into the country and crushed Czechoslovakia's effort to create "socialism with a human face." People walked outside for private conversations to escape the reach of listening devices.
NEWS
January 18, 1999 | JONATHAN LEVI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's Forgive-and-Forget Week in America. Last week, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences voted unanimously to give an honorary Oscar to Elia Kazan, who, nearly 50 years ago, in a single appearance before the House Committee on Un-American Activities, destroyed the careers of several fellow artists, including actor Morris Carnovsky and playwright Clifford Odets. While Hollywood might want to stuff the evil genies of the Cold War and Sen.
NEWS
June 30, 1997 | MICHAEL HARRIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's the spring of 1945, and in a jerry-built compound on a mesa in Los Alamos, N.M., the scientists assembled for the top-secret Manhattan Project are feverishly working to build the first atomic bomb. When a security officer is found murdered in nearby Santa Fe, the U.S. government can take no chances.
NEWS
January 20, 1999 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
So, how are those New Year's resolutions going? Is your resolve to (fill in the blank) still strong? Or have your 1999 resolutions already fizzled like the bubbles in a half-empty bottle of champagne that's been left out overnight? If so, you may have the wrong attitude. And attitude is everything, says Corona del Mar-based motivational speaker and executive consultant Tom Bay.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 2003 | Paula L. Woods, Special to The Times
One of the pleasures of good crime fiction is its ability to transport us beyond the familiar and into the mean streets of a different time and place. The war thriller, a subgenre, has long depended on two staples, World War II and the Cold War, to give readers a glimpse into environments impossible for most of us to experience firsthand.
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