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Joseph L Bernardin

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NEWS
August 31, 1996 | From Times Wire Services
Cardinal Joseph L. Bernardin calmly announced Friday that doctors expect him to die within a year from the pancreatic cancer he has fought for 14 months. "I can say with all sincerity that I am at peace," said Bernardin, the 68-year-old leader of Chicago's 2.3 million Roman Catholics. Bernardin had been given less than a 25% chance of surviving for five years after surgery for pancreatic cancer in June 1995. He said Friday that tests showed the cancer has spread to his liver.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 1996 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
From the moment the nation's Roman Catholic bishops opened their annual fall conference here, a dying archbishop nearly 700 miles away occupied their thoughts. As the bishops took up the business of voting on weighty matters of church and state, a silent and struggling presence seemed to walk the aisles in the grand ballroom where bishops met. In silent prayers, in public prayers, in abbreviated conversations on the elevator of the Omni Shorham Hotel, the name of Joseph L.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 1996 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
From the moment the nation's Roman Catholic bishops opened their annual fall conference here, a dying archbishop nearly 700 miles away occupied their thoughts. As the bishops took up the business of voting on weighty matters of church and state, a silent and struggling presence seemed to walk the aisles in the grand ballroom where bishops met. In silent prayers, in public prayers, in abbreviated conversations on the elevator of the Omni Shorham Hotel, the name of Joseph L.
NEWS
August 31, 1996 | From Times Wire Services
Cardinal Joseph L. Bernardin calmly announced Friday that doctors expect him to die within a year from the pancreatic cancer he has fought for 14 months. "I can say with all sincerity that I am at peace," said Bernardin, the 68-year-old leader of Chicago's 2.3 million Roman Catholics. Bernardin had been given less than a 25% chance of surviving for five years after surgery for pancreatic cancer in June 1995. He said Friday that tests showed the cancer has spread to his liver.
NEWS
June 12, 1995 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Cardinal Joseph L. Bernardin, archbishop of Chicago, checked into the Loyola University Medical Center for exploratory surgery to determine if he has pancreatic cancer. Tests have indicated that the 67-year-old cardinal has a tumor in his pancreas and an abnormality of the right kidney. Bernardin, who visited his mother before going to the hospital, received a telephone call from Pope John Paul II.
NEWS
October 18, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Cardinal Joseph L. Bernardin said he stopped receiving chemotherapy a week ago after a scan showed that it had not retarded the growth of his terminal pancreatic cancer. Bernardin, 68, the nation's senior active Roman Catholic prelate and leader of Chicago's 2.3 million Catholics, said his doctors now indicate that he cannot expect to live more than six or seven months.
NEWS
May 8, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Archbishop Francis George was installed as leader of the nation's third-largest Roman Catholic archdiocese, delivering a strongly worded homily calling for racial harmony to his Chicago flock. "In the church, every racial and cultural difference must be made public, so that everyone can come to know how Christ can be black, or white, or brown or yellow or red," George said during the elaborate ceremony at Holy Name Cathedral.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Chicago has closed 33 parishes and 20 schools since Cardinal Joseph L. Bernardin announced a retrenchment program in January, 1990, marking a 6.4% decline in the number of such institutions. The total is greater than the much-publicized closing of 30 parishes in the Archdiocese of Detroit in 1989, which was done in a much shorter time. The Chicago closings leave the 2.
NEWS
September 23, 1995 | Reuters
A man who recanted his accusations that Cardinal Joseph L. Bernardin had sexually molested him has died from complications related to AIDS, the Chicago archdiocese said Friday. "I was very saddened to learn of the death of Steven Cook," Bernardin said in a statement. "The reconciliation between Steven and myself last December was a blessed event for both us us." Cook, 36, died in Cincinnati. He carried HIV in 1993 when he accused Bernardin and another priest of molesting him in the mid-1970s.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 1996
We often ask if it is possible for a person to exercise high religious office and still retain the essential human qualities of compassion, humor and self-effacing dignity. Cardinal Joseph L. Bernardin's life and death provide us with an answer. Indeed, he seems to have been an exemplar of the highly touted (but perhaps too rarely seen) "Christian" life. The Times is to be commended for its coverage of Cardinal Bernardin's last days on earth. Judy Pasternak's and Larry B. Stammer's Nov. 14 and 16 articles provided rich insight into the cardinal's personality and the effect that his death had on the American Catholic bishops at their annual fall meeting.
NEWS
February 10, 1987 | Associated Press
The Vatican, which upset some American bishops when it disciplined Seattle Archbishop Raymond Hunthausen last year, has asked three of the nation's most influential Roman Catholic churchmen to take a new look at the situation. In a brief statement issued through the National Conference of Catholic Bishops, Pope John Paul II's representative to the United States said Monday that two cardinals, Joseph L.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1988 | United Press International
After looking at arms control developments over the last five years, a panel of U.S. Catholic bishops says the church should not back away from its conditional approval of nuclear deterrence. While saying they are unsatisfied with progress since the bishops' 1983 pastoral letter, "The Challenge of Peace," a committee of five bishops headed by Cardinal Joseph L. Bernardin of Chicago said, "We find condemning nuclear deterrence too drastic a solution and embracing it too simple a response."
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