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Joseph Lieberman

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 2000
Sen. Joseph I. Lieberman ("Lieberman and Religion Seem to Be an Easy Mix," Aug. 28) falls into a dangerous trap when he asserts that the Constitution protects "freedom of religion, not freedom from religion." He fails to recognize that official state-sponsored invocations of God across the country (as around the world) inevitably become linked to the particular faith of the local majority that asks for them, making others feel separated. He also ignores Jefferson's teaching that freedom of religion means freedom of conscience--which may include the belief that our conscience itself is a gift from those who raised us and our own best instincts and intelligence, rather than from a higher power.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Ella Freilich, 87, a Holocaust survivor who was the mother-in-law of U.S. senator and former vice-presidential candidate Joseph Lieberman, died Friday in New York of natural causes. Born in Rachov, Czechoslovakia, Freilich was the youngest of four siblings. In 1944, her family was sent to Auschwitz, where her mother and two sisters died. She was liberated in 1945. After World War II, she worked in Prague and in 1947 married Samuel Freilich.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Ella Freilich, 87, a Holocaust survivor who was the mother-in-law of U.S. senator and former vice-presidential candidate Joseph Lieberman, died Friday in New York of natural causes. Born in Rachov, Czechoslovakia, Freilich was the youngest of four siblings. In 1944, her family was sent to Auschwitz, where her mother and two sisters died. She was liberated in 1945. After World War II, she worked in Prague and in 1947 married Samuel Freilich.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 2001
According to Arthur Allan Seidelman, director of the latest "Hair" revival, "There has been a resurgence of that which is oppressive and not conducive to free expression," and that as long as President Bush and Atty. Gen. John Ashcroft are running the country, "Hair" is still relevant ("The Peace, Love and Freedom Party," by Patrick Pacheco, June 17). How tiresome--Republican bad, Democrat good. If Seidelman had checked, he'd know that a lot of the legislation that threatened our free expression over the past decade came from the left.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 2001 | Religion News Service
Sen. Joseph Lieberman (D-Conn.) has endorsed President Bush's plan to provide religious groups with federal funds to deliver social services. Lieberman, the 2000 Democratic vice presidential candidate and the first Jew to run for that office on a major party ticket, said supporters must make the case that there is a proper place for faith in public life.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 2000 | Associated Press
The nomination of Joseph Lieberman, an observant Jew, as a candidate for vice president of the United States was the year's top religion story, according to a survey of religion reporters. However, Lieberman ranked second to Pope John Paul as "religion newsmaker of the year."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 2001
According to Arthur Allan Seidelman, director of the latest "Hair" revival, "There has been a resurgence of that which is oppressive and not conducive to free expression," and that as long as President Bush and Atty. Gen. John Ashcroft are running the country, "Hair" is still relevant ("The Peace, Love and Freedom Party," by Patrick Pacheco, June 17). How tiresome--Republican bad, Democrat good. If Seidelman had checked, he'd know that a lot of the legislation that threatened our free expression over the past decade came from the left.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 2000
Re "The Lieberman Test for Multiethnic America," Opinion, Sept. 24: I'm shocked at the anti-Jewish article you published. Gregory Rodriguez commended Joseph Lieberman for abandoning his faith's prohibition of Jews marrying non-Jews. He writes, "But the rub comes when an adherent to what can be considered an ancient tribal principle seeks to represent all Americans in an executive office." In other words, my belief in the Torah means I'm adhering to an ancient tribal principle and disqualifies me from any American executive position?
OPINION
October 8, 2000
Better Qualified Re "Cheney and Lieberman Politely Stick to Scripts," Oct. 6: I support, in alphabetical order, a Cheney and Lieberman ticket. They can flip a coin or decide between themselves who gets president and vice president. It's hard to believe that the two presidential candidates could have chosen such clearly qualified and thoughtful people. JOHN A. MEYERS Los Angeles Your reporter couldn't have watched the debate I did. "[A] mild-mannered . . . debate that often muffled their differences beneath a blanket of civility"?
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 1996 | CLAUDIA PUIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It pretty much came down to "Dragnet" vs. "NYPD Blue." Jack Valenti, head of the Motion Picture Assn. of America, defended the moral lessons and downplayed the sometimes steamy visuals of the latter, while Ralph Reed, executive director of the Christian Coalition, waxed nostalgically about the straight-arrow style and on-screen propriety of the former. "I think 'NYPD Blue' is the finest-crafted show on television," Valenti said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 2001 | Religion News Service
Sen. Joseph Lieberman (D-Conn.) has endorsed President Bush's plan to provide religious groups with federal funds to deliver social services. Lieberman, the 2000 Democratic vice presidential candidate and the first Jew to run for that office on a major party ticket, said supporters must make the case that there is a proper place for faith in public life.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 2000 | Associated Press
The nomination of Joseph Lieberman, an observant Jew, as a candidate for vice president of the United States was the year's top religion story, according to a survey of religion reporters. However, Lieberman ranked second to Pope John Paul as "religion newsmaker of the year."
OPINION
October 8, 2000
Better Qualified Re "Cheney and Lieberman Politely Stick to Scripts," Oct. 6: I support, in alphabetical order, a Cheney and Lieberman ticket. They can flip a coin or decide between themselves who gets president and vice president. It's hard to believe that the two presidential candidates could have chosen such clearly qualified and thoughtful people. JOHN A. MEYERS Los Angeles Your reporter couldn't have watched the debate I did. "[A] mild-mannered . . . debate that often muffled their differences beneath a blanket of civility"?
NEWS
October 1, 2000 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Al Gore's detractors have mocked him as a risk-averse politician who makes no move until he takes a poll or convenes a focus group. They should have seen him recently on the pitcher's mound at Comerica Park. Gore had been on the field only a few minutes before a New York tabloid reporter yelled, taunting from a seat behind home plate: "Let's see whatcha got, Al!"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 2000
Re "The Lieberman Test for Multiethnic America," Opinion, Sept. 24: I'm shocked at the anti-Jewish article you published. Gregory Rodriguez commended Joseph Lieberman for abandoning his faith's prohibition of Jews marrying non-Jews. He writes, "But the rub comes when an adherent to what can be considered an ancient tribal principle seeks to represent all Americans in an executive office." In other words, my belief in the Torah means I'm adhering to an ancient tribal principle and disqualifies me from any American executive position?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 2000 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
With the traditional blowing of the shofar, Jews around the world welcomed in the New Year on Friday--a year that, at least for American Jews, is being shaped by the vice presidential candidacy of Sen. Joseph Lieberman. Ever since Lieberman became Al Gore's running mate on the Democratic ticket, his presence has been a cause for celebration among Jews. But his prominence has also renewed soul-searching for many over what it means to be Jewish.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 2000 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES RELIGION WRITER
With the traditional blowing of the shofar, Jews around the world welcomed in the New Year on Friday--a year that, at least for American Jews, is being shaped by the vice presidential candidacy of Sen. Joseph Lieberman. Ever since Lieberman became Al Gore's running mate on the Democratic ticket, his presence has been a cause for celebration among Jews. But his prominence has also renewed soul-searching for many over what it means to be Jewish.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 2000
Democratic vice presidential nominee Joseph I. Lieberman went before a jammed Staples Center crowd of delegates and guests to tell them a bit about who he is and his hopes for the campaign ahead. "Is this a great country or what?" he asked at the outset, seemingly awed by the idea that the Jewish son of a bakery truck driver should rise to such political heights.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 2000
Sen. Joseph I. Lieberman ("Lieberman and Religion Seem to Be an Easy Mix," Aug. 28) falls into a dangerous trap when he asserts that the Constitution protects "freedom of religion, not freedom from religion." He fails to recognize that official state-sponsored invocations of God across the country (as around the world) inevitably become linked to the particular faith of the local majority that asks for them, making others feel separated. He also ignores Jefferson's teaching that freedom of religion means freedom of conscience--which may include the belief that our conscience itself is a gift from those who raised us and our own best instincts and intelligence, rather than from a higher power.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 2000
Democratic vice presidential nominee Joseph I. Lieberman went before a jammed Staples Center crowd of delegates and guests to tell them a bit about who he is and his hopes for the campaign ahead. "Is this a great country or what?" he asked at the outset, seemingly awed by the idea that the Jewish son of a bakery truck driver should rise to such political heights.
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