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Joseph Massino

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June 24, 2005 | From Newsday
In a watershed moment in the city's mob history, Bonanno crime family boss Joseph Massino was sentenced Thursday to life in prison after pleading guilty in connection with one murder and waiving his right to appeal a separate racketeering case in which he was convicted last year. In response to questioning from U.S. District Judge Nicholas Garaufis, Massino admitted to ordering the killing of Bonanno captain Gerlando Sciascia, whose body, police said, was dumped on a Bronx street in March 1999.
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NATIONAL
June 24, 2005 | From Newsday
In a watershed moment in the city's mob history, Bonanno crime family boss Joseph Massino was sentenced Thursday to life in prison after pleading guilty in connection with one murder and waiving his right to appeal a separate racketeering case in which he was convicted last year. In response to questioning from U.S. District Judge Nicholas Garaufis, Massino admitted to ordering the killing of Bonanno captain Gerlando Sciascia, whose body, police said, was dumped on a Bronx street in March 1999.
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NATIONAL
May 3, 2004 | Josh Getlin, Times Staff Writer
As crime bosses go, Joseph Massino has been strictly old school, a wiseguy more wary than wild in a city that turns reputed mob leaders into celebrities. Unlike John Gotti, who loved fancy clothes, flashy cars and media attention, the alleged head of the Bonanno crime family has long shunned the spotlight. But as Massino prepares to stand trial this month on seven murder charges -- a case that is being billed as one of New York's great mob trials -- notoriety is about to engulf him.
NATIONAL
May 3, 2004 | Josh Getlin, Times Staff Writer
As crime bosses go, Joseph Massino has been strictly old school, a wiseguy more wary than wild in a city that turns reputed mob leaders into celebrities. Unlike John Gotti, who loved fancy clothes, flashy cars and media attention, the alleged head of the Bonanno crime family has long shunned the spotlight. But as Massino prepares to stand trial this month on seven murder charges -- a case that is being billed as one of New York's great mob trials -- notoriety is about to engulf him.
NATIONAL
January 10, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
The reputed boss of the Bonanno crime family was indicted in connection with the 1981 murder of a mobster who let the FBI infiltrate the group, officials said. The case inspired the movie "Donnie Brasco." Federal prosecutors said Joseph Massino, 60, also faces charges of racketeering, conspiracy and illegal gambling.
NATIONAL
November 12, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Federal prosecutors told lawyers for Mafia kingpin Joseph Massino in New York that they intended to ask for the death penalty in the 1999 killing of Gerlando Sciascia, a captain in Massino's crime family. Massino lawyer David Breitbart said the decision was a "parting gift" from U.S. Atty. Gen. John Ashcroft, who has announced his resignation. "It seems absolutely absurd," Breitbart said.
NATIONAL
July 31, 2004 | John J. Goldman, Times Staff Writer
Joseph Massino, the head of the Bonanno organized crime family, was found guilty of murder and racketeering Friday in a trial marked by massive defections from the mob. The jury, which began deliberating Monday, also found him guilty of arson, money laundering, loan sharking, gambling and extortion. Massino, 61, faces a mandatory life sentence. As the verdicts were read, Massino stood silently in court in Brooklyn.
NATIONAL
February 9, 2008 | Anthony M. DeStefano, Newsday
The brutal 1981 slaying of three Bonanno crime family captains could lead to more charges in the big mob investigation that on Thursday resulted in the arrest of scores of Gambino crime family members and associates. Federal prosecutors in Brooklyn have told Judge Nicholas G. Garaufis that their investigation, which resulted in the arrest of the reputed leadership of the Gambino family and numerous captains and soldiers, is focusing in part on the 1981 slayings.
NEWS
November 2, 1997 | LARRY McSHANE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
In the twin windows of Little Italy's Ravenite Social Club, a pair of faded, frayed yellow ribbons dangle as reminders of a godfather gone for good: Gambino family boss John Gotti. The dull fabric recalls a time when Gotti ruled from his Mulberry Street headquarters and spoke--in a 1990 conversation captured for posterity by a government bug--about "a Cosa Nostra till . . . 100 years from now." But just seven years later, Gotti is in prison for life. The Ravenite has been seized by the feds.
NATIONAL
April 28, 2005 | Stephen Braun and Michael J. Goodman, Times Staff Writers
It has always been about the murders. Behind Joey "the Clown" Lombardo's courtroom antics and oversized glasses, behind Frankie "the German" Schweihs' alleged shakedowns of adult bookstores well into his golden years, behind the Chicago outfit's scrounging for profits from Las Vegas strip clubs and the Philly mob's suicide wars and the destruction of the New York families in federal courtrooms, the American fascination with organized crime has always turned to murder and its consequences.
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