Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJoseph Mccarthy
IN THE NEWS

Joseph Mccarthy

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 1999 | KIT RACHLIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Joseph McCarthy arrived in Los Angeles in August 1953 to hold public hearings, he was at the pinnacle of his power. The previous fall, Wisconsin voters had elected him to the U.S. Senate for a second term. His wedding, just a month away, would boast a guest list of 1,000 and include such members of the Washington elite as Vice President Richard Nixon, CIA Director Allen Dulles and Sen. John F. Kennedy.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2011 | By Dennis Lim, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Nicolas Roeg's 1985 film "Insignificance," newly issued in standard and Blu-ray DVD editions by the Criterion Collection, has an irresistible premise that suggests a blind item from a parallel universe. Four characters identified only as the Actress, the Professor, the Ballplayer and the Senator — but instantly recognizable, thanks to some none too subtle identifying traits, as Marilyn Monroe, Albert Einstein, Joe DiMaggio and Joseph McCarthy — somehow converge in a Manhattan hotel room over the course of an eventful night in summer 1954.
Advertisement
NEWS
March 24, 2000
Warren E. Magee, 91, a lawyer whose penchant for defending the rights of pariahs brought him his best-known clients: a Nazi war criminal and Sen. Joseph R. McCarthy (R-Wis.). Magee had practiced for 18 years in Washington, and was known for his defense work for at least one disgraced congressman, when he was asked in 1948 to take part in the Nuremberg war crimes trials. His client was Baron Ernst von Weizsaecker, the former German secretary of state and wartime ambassador to the Vatican.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 2011 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Joseph Wershba, a pioneering CBS reporter and producer whose work on Edward R. Murrow's "See It Now" series in the 1950s helped expose the McCarthy era's communist witch hunt and demonstrated the power of television, has died. He was 90. Wershba, a two-time Emmy Award winner who was one of the original segment producers on "60 Minutes," died Saturday of pneumonia at North Shore Hospital on Long Island, said his wife, Shirley. In what became a more than 50-year career in broadcast and print journalism, Wershba joined CBS radio as a news writer in New York in 1944 and later worked on Murrow's "Hear It Now" radio series before it moved to television in 1952 as "See It Now. " Wershba was the on-camera reporter and field producer on "The Case Against Lt. Milo Radulovich A0589839," a 1953 "See It Now" segment that demonstrated the excesses and dangers of Sen. Joseph McCarthy's anti-communist crusade and the effects of guilt by association.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 2006 | Tim Rutten, Times Staff Writer
HIS star turn in the national limelight lasted about five years, little more than a single presidency, yet no public man of his era still haunts our political imagination in quite the way that Joseph McCarthy does. He is one of those rare politicians whose name has been preserved in the linguistic amber of the eponymy. We speak today of "McCarthyism." It is a kind of political pornography -- difficult to define precisely but, like its sexual counterpart, you know it when you see it.
NEWS
January 24, 2002 | JOE MATHEWS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
His mother doted on him. His older brother bullied him. By 14 he had his own chicken farm, and by the time he was 19, it had failed. It wasn't until age 20 that he started high school; classmates voted him "Most Lovable Man." He was a judge at 30 and a U.S. senator before 40. Although the early life of Joseph McCarthy was a politician's dream, he died in 1957 at age 48, felled by hepatitis and liquor and the certainty of history's harsh judgment.
BOOKS
November 21, 1999 | DOUGLAS BRINKLEY, Douglas Brinkley is the author of "Dean Acheson: The Cold War Years" and "Driven Patriot: The Life and Times of James Forrestal." He is director of the Eisenhower Center and professor of history at the University of New Orleans
On the night of Feb. 9, 1950, a GOP women's group in Wheeling, W. Va., heard one of the most deplorable speeches in the annals of American politics when a reckless and bombastic freshman Republican senator from Wisconsin charged that the Truman administration was teeming with communists. Waving a sheet of paper like a battle flag, Joseph McCarthy claimed he had a list of some 205 Red traitors in his hand--a dishonor roll of U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 1999
Richard Reeves' column on Richard Nixon's personal goals (Commentary, Aug. 9) conjures up the kind of sentimental hogwash that characterized Nixon's persona. In our family there never will be any form of revisionist history conveyed to our children about his presidency. He remains one of the great political criminals of the 20th century, alongside J. Edgar Hoover and Joseph McCarthy, who tore up the Constitution when it didn't fit their personal agendas. REX ALTMAN Los Angeles
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 1991
I feel it unfair to place joke commentaries such as Scruton's satirical piece of fluff about "poor Joseph McCarthy" on the Op-Ed pages. Such amusements belong in the comics. This one, which attempted to whitewash an alcoholic who lied and produced false evidence against the hero of D-Day, would look great next to Beetle Bailey. It is a joke, isn't it? JOSEPH LUCAS Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 1991
In response to letter writer A.F. Sanders' diatribe in the Dec. 30 issue: "Morgan," "Blow-Up," "Isadora," "The Devils," "Mary, Queen of Scots," "Julia," "Playing for Time," "The Bostonians," "Wetherby," "Second Serve," "A Man for All Seasons," "Prick Up Your Ears" and "Orpheus Descending" for film and television. "Orpheus" again, "Cymbeline," "As You Like It," "The Seagull," "The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie," "Lady From the Sea," "Touch of the Poet," "Major Barbara," "Three Penny Opera," "Ghosts," "Twelfth Night," "Antony and Cleopatra" and "The Taming of the Shrew" on stage.
OPINION
July 30, 2010 | By Abraham Cooper
First, full disclosure: I am the Left Coast representative of the Jewish conspiratorial lobby that Oliver Stone was fretting over in his recent interview with London's Sunday Times. You know, the Jews, whose "domination of the media" prevent Hitler and Stalin from being portrayed "in context." It seems the once and future wunderkind was also frustrated that no one understands that it was the Russians who were damaged more than the Jews during World War II. I think he had the score of 25 million or 30 million to 6 million.
OPINION
March 8, 2009
Re "The tired war on Limbaugh," Opinion, March 3 I certainly believe there is cynicism in the Obama administration's declaration that Rush Limbaugh is the true GOP leader. As Limbaugh says, and Jonah Goldberg parrots, there is absolutely nothing wrong with Rush declaring that he wants the president to fail in implementing his liberal agenda. The administration's cynicism is used in the hope that Republicans will act on the fact that Limbaugh has become a very dangerous person. Just like Joseph McCarthy in the 1950s (I'm old enough to remember)
OPINION
November 5, 2006
Re "40 years have seen openness, civility fade as cynicism gains," column, Nov. 2 I doubt the rose-colored version of the political past that George Skelton paints. I wasn't alive to see Ronald Reagan as governor, but I understand that he said, "If it takes a bloodbath to silence the demonstrators, let's get it over with," in reference to the 1960s student unrest at Berkeley. Is this quotation apocryphal? Students there started the Free Speech Movement in 1964, a watershed that led to the antiwar movement.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 2006 | Tim Rutten, Times Staff Writer
HIS star turn in the national limelight lasted about five years, little more than a single presidency, yet no public man of his era still haunts our political imagination in quite the way that Joseph McCarthy does. He is one of those rare politicians whose name has been preserved in the linguistic amber of the eponymy. We speak today of "McCarthyism." It is a kind of political pornography -- difficult to define precisely but, like its sexual counterpart, you know it when you see it.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 2005
TIM RUTTEN is simply one of the best media critics around. His column on Condoleezza Rice's evasions on torture -- and the media's failure to put her statements into adequate historical context -- was on target ["Rice and the Press Make It Unclear," Dec. 10]. If the media report only facts, they miss the truth. David Brinkley had it right when he said that it was a fact that Joseph McCarthy claimed to have the names of dozens of State Department employees who were Communists, but that it wasn't the truth.
OPINION
December 16, 2005 | Jack Miles, JACK MILES is senior fellow with the Pacific Council on International Policy and the author of "God: A Biography," which won a Pulitzer Prize in 1996.
TURKEY'S FINEST novelist, Orhan Pamuk, goes on trial today on the charge of "insulting" his country. Article 301/1 of the Turkish Penal Code stipulates that anyone "who explicitly insults being a Turk, the Republic or the Turkish Grand National Assembly, shall be imposed to a penalty of imprisonment for a term of six months to three years." Pamuk's "insult" was printed in a Swiss newspaper last February.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 1985 | From Times Wire Services
William Ezra Jenner, a senator second only to Joseph McCarthy in his wide-ranging denunications of what he said were the "communist dupes" in the Truman Administration, has died in a hospital here. Jenner, a Republican who represented Indiana in the Senate from 1946 until 1958, was 76. A spokesman for Dunn Memorial Hospital said the retired senator had been unconscious since Feb,. 28 and suffered respiratory problems. He died Saturday night. Jenner, who once branded President Harry S.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 2005
TIM RUTTEN is simply one of the best media critics around. His column on Condoleezza Rice's evasions on torture -- and the media's failure to put her statements into adequate historical context -- was on target ["Rice and the Press Make It Unclear," Dec. 10]. If the media report only facts, they miss the truth. David Brinkley had it right when he said that it was a fact that Joseph McCarthy claimed to have the names of dozens of State Department employees who were Communists, but that it wasn't the truth.
NATIONAL
November 6, 2005 | Tim Jones, Chicago Tribune
Poor Joe McCarthy. Can't even catch a break from the locals. As the legendary patron saint of broadcast news, Edward R. Murrow, moved into town this weekend to slay the widely despised U.S. senator from Wisconsin in the new movie "Good Night, and Good Luck," there is hardly a public acknowledgment here that the self-styled warlord of anti-communism, the man whose name became an "ism" was once a popular hometown boy of humble origins. Today there is scant evidence that Joseph R.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 2005 | Steve Harvey
Actor-director George Clooney says some members of test audiences for "Good Night, and Good Luck," his movie about broadcaster Edward R. Murrow, expressed admiration for the actor who played Sen. Joseph McCarthy. One problem: That wasn't an actor. The movie used only newsreel footage of McCarthy.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|