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Joseph Musil

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 2001 | VIVIAN LETRAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joseph Musil of Santa Ana will never forget the day his grandmother took him to the Strand Theatre in Long Beach. The year was 1941 and he was only 4. Back then, movies were screened with live musical fanfare and lights that changed colors as they shined on the curtain. That trip to the movies turned out to be a defining moment in Musil's life. Now he's a theater designer creating his own glamour and glitz.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 2010 | Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Joseph J. Musil, a Santa Ana-based theater designer with a flair for showmanship and a reverence for a bygone era of movie-going whose work included the restoration of the El Capitan Theatre in Hollywood and the transformation of the Crest Theater in Westwood, has died. He was 73. Musil, who had a long history of heart disease and diabetes, died of heart failure June 28 in a convalescent hospital in Orange, said his brother, Robert. "Joe had an unlimited imagination," said Ed Collins, general manager of the El Capitan, the Disney-operated movie palace on Hollywood Boulevard.
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NEWS
February 26, 1997 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Theater designer Joseph Musil is used to strangers knocking on his door. When they look through the window of his studio in the Santora Building--the historic downtown Santa Ana office complex on Broadway that has been transformed into a warren of artists' studios and galleries--few can resist asking to take a closer look. But the view through the window--of lavish, scale-model copies of 19th century European toy theaters--provides only an inkling of Musil's domain.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 2001 | VIVIAN LETRAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joseph Musil of Santa Ana will never forget the day his grandmother took him to the Strand Theatre in Long Beach. The year was 1941 and he was only 4. Back then, movies were screened with live musical fanfare and lights that changed colors as they shined on the curtain. That trip to the movies turned out to be a defining moment in Musil's life. Now he's a theater designer creating his own glamour and glitz.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 2010 | Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Joseph J. Musil, a Santa Ana-based theater designer with a flair for showmanship and a reverence for a bygone era of movie-going whose work included the restoration of the El Capitan Theatre in Hollywood and the transformation of the Crest Theater in Westwood, has died. He was 73. Musil, who had a long history of heart disease and diabetes, died of heart failure June 28 in a convalescent hospital in Orange, said his brother, Robert. "Joe had an unlimited imagination," said Ed Collins, general manager of the El Capitan, the Disney-operated movie palace on Hollywood Boulevard.
NEWS
April 10, 1997 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Theater designer Joseph Musil is used to strangers knocking on his door. When they look through the window of his studio in the Santora Building--a historic downtown Santa Ana office complex that has been transformed into a warren of artists' studios and galleries--few can resist asking to take a closer look. But the view through the window--of lavish, scale-model copies of 19th century European toy theaters--provides only an inkling of Musil's domain.
REAL ESTATE
September 20, 1992
The revitalized El Capitan Theatre, a landmark movie palace since the days of Garbo and Gable, will receive a 1992 National Preservation Honor Award from the National Trust for Historic Preservation. The awards ceremony will be held Oct. 8 at the 46th National Preservation Conference in Miami.
NEWS
June 10, 2011 | By Chris Erskine, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Coronado’s elegant old Art Deco-style movie house, the Village Theatre , is reopening in two weeks after a 10-year closure, adding another attraction to one of Southern California ’s most well-tended and winsome tourist destinations. This is hardly the theater that first opened in 1947 on the main thoroughfare of the town on San Diego Bay. Two more screens have been added, as well as 3-D technology. Theater designer Joseph Musil, who helped restore the historic El Capitan Theatre in Hollywood, helped oversee details of this restoration too. Musil died last year before seeing his final project completed, but his influence can be seen in the large murals hand-painted by Disney muralist Bill Anderson.
NEWS
September 26, 2002
Designer Joseph Musil will talk about restoring historic theater buildings at 7 tonight at the First Lutheran Church, 215 N. Lemon St., Fullerton. Musil was a consultant for Disney and Pacific Theatres' award-winning restoration of the El Capitan, which reopened on Hollywood Boulevard in 1991.
NEWS
April 23, 1992 | AARON BETSKY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Aaron Betsky teaches and writes about architecture and urban design
Pacific's El Capitan Theatre offers the most magnificent movie-going experience you can find beyond the arms of Mann's Chinese. After decades of decay and a preservation scuffle, this former live-performance theater has become the showplace for Disney films.
NEWS
April 10, 1997 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Theater designer Joseph Musil is used to strangers knocking on his door. When they look through the window of his studio in the Santora Building--a historic downtown Santa Ana office complex that has been transformed into a warren of artists' studios and galleries--few can resist asking to take a closer look. But the view through the window--of lavish, scale-model copies of 19th century European toy theaters--provides only an inkling of Musil's domain.
NEWS
February 26, 1997 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Theater designer Joseph Musil is used to strangers knocking on his door. When they look through the window of his studio in the Santora Building--the historic downtown Santa Ana office complex on Broadway that has been transformed into a warren of artists' studios and galleries--few can resist asking to take a closer look. But the view through the window--of lavish, scale-model copies of 19th century European toy theaters--provides only an inkling of Musil's domain.
MAGAZINE
September 22, 1991 | BARBARA THORNBURG
Hollywood. In the past, the city was synonymous with glamour and glitz, riches and romance. And things may be that way again. True visionaries are going to great lengths to restore famous residences, refurbish landmark buildings and even open museums devoted to Tinseltown. Here, a few projects that are cause for applause. The restoration of the El Capitan Theatre on Hollywood Boulevard offers a generation raised on multiplex theaters a chance to step back in time and view a genuine movie palace.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 1997 | BENJAMIN EPSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Artistically speaking, it can take a village to raise a city--and in the case of Santa Ana, the Artists Village at Santora Arts Complex and environs may do the trick. One unoccupied storefront sports the slogan "SoHo, So What?" AFTERNOON: 1, 2, 3 Historic buildings house scores of studios and galleries. Many studios at the Santora Arts Complex, which has been open since July 1995, are working spaces, and artists' hours can be random. Thanks to picture windows, some displays are always visible.
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