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Joseph N Miniace

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BUSINESS
September 4, 2004 | Ronald D. White, Times Staff Writer
The Pacific Maritime Assn. has a filed a countersuit in federal court against its former chief executive, Joseph N. Miniace, and other parties saying they improperly diverted a $10-million settlement of an insurance policy. Miniace sued the association in July, claiming the San Francisco-based organization fired him without cause and owed him more than $1 million in bonuses, severance pay and other compensation. The association countersued Aug. 27 in U.S. District Court in San Francisco.
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BUSINESS
August 5, 2000 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A veteran dockworker and labor official from Los Angeles was elected Friday to head the International Longshore and Warehouse Union, among the nation's most powerful labor organizations and one that is facing a range of difficult technological issues on the West Coast. James Spinosa, 59, defeated incumbent Brian McWilliams for president of the San Francisco-based union, which has about 60,000 members in Alaska, California, Oregon, Washington, Hawaii and Canada.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 1999 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A proposed settlement to increase goals for hiring female dockworkers in the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach stalled Friday when a federal judge allowed a group of longshoremen to raise allegations that the settlement might result in reverse discrimination. In a three-page written ruling, District Judge Robert M.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 1998 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Frustrated by more than 135 illegal union actions that have repeatedly idled West Coast ports since 1996, a powerful organization of shipping companies is seeking a court order to prevent dock workers from violating contract provisions designed to prohibit strikes and work slowdowns. The Pacific Maritime Assn.
NEWS
July 16, 1999 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Longshore workers and shipping companies agreed to a new labor contract late Thursday, clearing the way for the resumption of normal cargo operations at West Coast ports that have been plagued by work stoppages and slowdowns for the last 10 days. After almost two months of bargaining in San Francisco, the powerful International Longshore and Warehouse Union and the Pacific Maritime Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 2000 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Citing threats to harbor jobs and the safety of seafarers, dockworkers in the county's ports are mounting a campaign to prevent foreign crews of cargo ships from performing allegedly illegal longshore tasks while at sea and in local waters. Under federal law and many international labor contracts, dock work is, with some exceptions, off limits to merchant seafarers.
NEWS
May 17, 1999 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After three years of labor tension and court battles, shipping companies and the powerful dockworkers union this week will begin contract negotiations over basic working conditions and further modernization of America's West Coast ports, including Los Angeles and Long Beach.
BUSINESS
November 10, 2002 | Dan Weikel, Times Staff Writer
If longshore workers are lords of the docks, James Spinosa is lord of lords. As head of the International Longshore and Warehouse Union, the veteran marine clerk leads 10,500 West Coast laborers who load and unload the raw materials, cars, clothes, computers, toys and other consumer goods that propel the economies of the Pacific Rim. He rose to power in the late 1990s, during one of the union's most rancorous periods.
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