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Joseph Nerette

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October 9, 1991 | WILLIAM J. EATON and NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Risking tough international sanctions, this embattled island nation on Tuesday installed Supreme Court Justice Joseph Nerette as its interim leader to replace deposed President Jean-Bertrand Aristide. The National Assembly convened in formal session eight days after Aristide was removed in a military coup to swear in his successor. This set the stage for new elections within 90 days.
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NEWS
April 13, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Interim President Joseph Nerette rejected a plan mediated by the Organization of American States to reinstate ousted President Jean-Bertrand Aristide. In a radio broadcast from the National Palace, Nerette accused Aristide of constitutional violations that prompted the "unfortunate" coup on Sept. 30. Only a solution developed by Haitians themselves "will have a chance of keeping the peace in Haiti," Nerette said.
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NEWS
April 13, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Interim President Joseph Nerette rejected a plan mediated by the Organization of American States to reinstate ousted President Jean-Bertrand Aristide. In a radio broadcast from the National Palace, Nerette accused Aristide of constitutional violations that prompted the "unfortunate" coup on Sept. 30. Only a solution developed by Haitians themselves "will have a chance of keeping the peace in Haiti," Nerette said.
NEWS
March 7, 1992 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joseph Nerette, the figurehead president of Haiti's military-run regime, on Friday defied an internationally arranged agreement to return ousted President Jean-Bertrand Aristide to power and end a choking economic embargo. Saying he would not resign his post, Nerette told the National Assembly that the agreement "violates" the Haitian constitution and is the result of unacceptable foreign interference in Haiti's internal affairs.
NEWS
March 7, 1992 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joseph Nerette, the figurehead president of Haiti's military-run regime, on Friday defied an internationally arranged agreement to return ousted President Jean-Bertrand Aristide to power and end a choking economic embargo. Saying he would not resign his post, Nerette told the National Assembly that the agreement "violates" the Haitian constitution and is the result of unacceptable foreign interference in Haiti's internal affairs.
NEWS
January 14, 1992 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an act full of unintended irony and defiance, the puppet civilian government here said Monday that it would not go gently from office and called for the defeat of a compromise solution to the Haitian political and economic crisis. Speaking to the opening session of Haiti's National Assembly, Joseph Nerette, the provisional president imposed by the army after the Sept.
NEWS
October 8, 1991 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Acting under direct army pressure, the National Assembly voted Monday to replace deposed President Jean-Bertrand Aristide and set the stage for new elections within 90 days. With soldiers ringing the building and occasionally firing shots in the air, the lawmakers unanimously invoked an emergency provision of the Haitian constitution to declare the presidency vacant and chose Supreme Court Justice Joseph Nerette as interim head of state. It was not known whether he would accept.
NEWS
October 19, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Provisional President Joseph Nerette, who replaced ousted President Jean-Bertrand Aristide 10 days ago, has made no public appearances in the past week and may be seriously ill, a Western diplomat and political sources said. The disappearance of Nerette, 67, fueled rumors that a fresh political crisis faces the Caribbean nation following a Sept. 30 military coup that deposed Aristide and brought condemnation from most Western governments.
NEWS
October 10, 1991 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thousands of poor slum-dwellers who passionately supported Jean-Claude Aristide fled Haiti's capital Wednesday in fear of reprisals from soldiers who ousted him from the presidency. Departing was their way of voting no confidence in the army-backed interim government headed by Supreme Court Judge Joseph Nerette. Like the Organization of American States, they want Aristide restored as president--but they feel powerless to do anything about it.
NEWS
June 9, 1993 | From Times Wire Services
Prime Minister Marc Bazin stepped down Tuesday, and ousted President Jean-Bertrand Aristide said he hoped the move would lead to his own return to power within days. The impoverished country, struggling with a two-year-old political crisis and a U.S.-led trade embargo, reacted peacefully to the news. The capital was crowded with pedestrians, street merchants and battered vehicles.
NEWS
January 14, 1992 | KENNETH FREED, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an act full of unintended irony and defiance, the puppet civilian government here said Monday that it would not go gently from office and called for the defeat of a compromise solution to the Haitian political and economic crisis. Speaking to the opening session of Haiti's National Assembly, Joseph Nerette, the provisional president imposed by the army after the Sept.
NEWS
October 9, 1991 | WILLIAM J. EATON and NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Risking tough international sanctions, this embattled island nation on Tuesday installed Supreme Court Justice Joseph Nerette as its interim leader to replace deposed President Jean-Bertrand Aristide. The National Assembly convened in formal session eight days after Aristide was removed in a military coup to swear in his successor. This set the stage for new elections within 90 days.
NEWS
October 8, 1991 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Acting under direct army pressure, the National Assembly voted Monday to replace deposed President Jean-Bertrand Aristide and set the stage for new elections within 90 days. With soldiers ringing the building and occasionally firing shots in the air, the lawmakers unanimously invoked an emergency provision of the Haitian constitution to declare the presidency vacant and chose Supreme Court Justice Joseph Nerette as interim head of state. It was not known whether he would accept.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 1991
Under extreme pressure from the military units that helped oust President Jean-Bertrand Aristide, Haiti's National Assembly has named a supreme court justice, Joseph Nerette, as interim president. That is a patently transparent attempt to fool the outside world into thinking that constitutional order has been restored in Haiti, and it won't work.
NEWS
June 3, 1992 | From Associated Press
The military-backed interim government designated a conservative politician Tuesday to become Haiti's new leader, state-run National Radio said. Marc Bazin, a former World Bank official and businessman, is to assume the post of prime minister and run a consensus government under a plan backed by the army and many politicians. Bazin's appointment has been opposed by the international community and supporters of ousted President Jean-Bertrand Aristide.
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