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Joseph P Kennedy Jr Foundation

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 1989 | JEFFREY A. PERLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nathan Hashbarger was not thinking about drugs or the problem of teen pregnancies when he arrived at the school district's headquarters for a meeting early Thursday morning. But Hashbarger, 13-year-old student body vice president at Isaac L. Sowers Middle School in Huntington Beach, and two dozen other middle school students were shortly to confront those issues and other difficult questions. They started by meeting Eunice Kennedy Shriver, sister of President John F. Kennedy.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 1989 | JEFFREY A. PERLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nathan Hashbarger was not thinking about drugs or the problem of teen pregnancies when he arrived at the school district's headquarters for a meeting early Thursday morning. But Hashbarger, 13-year-old student body vice president at Isaac L. Sowers Middle School in Huntington Beach, and two dozen other middle school students were shortly to confront those issues and other difficult questions. They started by meeting Eunice Kennedy Shriver, sister of President John F. Kennedy.
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NEWS
March 16, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
John F. Kennedy Jr. and the City University of New York announced a program to further educate and train those who work with the mentally and developmentally disabled. The program is for workers in low-paying jobs "simply because educational programs do not exist which would allow them to advance in their careers and enhance their income," the school said in a statement. The initiative will be funded by the Joseph P. Kennedy Jr. Foundation. The first 10 Kennedy Fellows were named Thursday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 29, 1986
His head thrown back, just like the runners he had seen in "Chariots of Fire," John Weidman was a study in exultation as he neared the finish line in the 200-meter dash. No matter that he finished third in a field of three. The important thing was that the 23-year-old man from Kings County, who has Down's syndrome, finished at all in his first state race. "He usually veers off to one side," explained his proud father as he snapped pictures of the beaming, sweaty athlete.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 2003 | Joe Mathews, Times Staff Writer
Arnold Schwarzenegger unveiled a team of education advisors on Wednesday that includes classroom teachers, district superintendents and his own mother-in-law, and vowed to give local officials more control over schooling. After a nearly two-hour meeting with the 24-member panel, which is chaired by former Los Angeles Mayor Richard Riordan, Schwarzenegger told reporters that he wanted to reduce federal and state involvement in education and return more "local control" to the schools.
NEWS
July 9, 1995 | ENRIQUE LAVIN
When Ana Rosa and Ignacio Alcaraz discovered eight years ago they were going to have a child with a developmental disorder, they didn't know where to turn for help. "We didn't accept our daughter, Gaby," said Ana Rosa, 36, a key-shop owner in Huntington Park. "We felt embarrassed to take her out, so my mother would care for her." Then Rosario Marin, 37, changed their lives, the couple said. "Thanks to her we learned to accept [Gaby]," Ana Rosa said. "We've learned how to grow together."
NATIONAL
March 30, 2008 | Michael Dobbs, Washington Post
Addressing civil rights activists in Selma, Ala., a year ago, Sen. Barack Obama traced his "very existence" to the generosity of the Kennedy family, which he said paid for his Kenyan father to travel to America on a student scholarship and thus meet his Kansan mother. The Camelot connection has become part of the mythology surrounding Obama's bid for the Democratic presidential nomination. It is a touching story -- but key details are either untrue or grossly oversimplified.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 1995 | EFRAIN HERNANDEZ JR./ TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rosario Marin and her 9-year-old son, Eric, pull into their driveway in her white convertible with the "Ask Me About Down's Syndrome" license frame on the back. In moments, Marin, a Huntington Park city councilwoman, and Eric are inside. The boy soon settles in, right in front of the family television.
NEWS
June 25, 1999 | From Times Staff Writers
Dr. Louis K. Diamond, the pediatric hematologist who in 1932 recognized and first described the problem of blood group incompatibility between mother and unborn child commonly known as the Rh factor, has died. He was 97. Diamond, who worked for three universities during his 60-year academic career and helped organize the national Red Cross system for blood donations and collection, died June 14 at his home in Los Angeles.
SPORTS
June 4, 1987 | WENDY OLSON, Times Staff Writer
"Trust me." That phrase is 18-year-old Mark Hembd's signal to Coach Arnold Schwarzenegger that he's ready to proceed with the weightlifting demonstration. Yes, that's Schwarzenegger as in Conan, and Hembd as in, well, as in Mark Hembd, Anaheim Western High School swimmer, Mike Hembd's twin brother. Special Olympian Mark Hembd. Mark and Mike, the elder by 10 minutes, have Down's syndrome.
NEWS
December 7, 1988 | Marylouise Oates
The celebration of the Special Olympics Monday turned into one of the "thousand points of light" that President-elect George Bush kept campaigning about. For one brief shining moment, it also looked a lot like Camelot. No one from either coast will ever believe that Hollywood is not one continual party--or that Washington is not the world's most exciting city.
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