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Joseph Papp

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 1991
What will we do without Joseph Papp to give us artistic and management standards? This was a man who always delivered as promised, who never weaseled a decision or opinion, who fought for the playwright and who never faltered when risks might mean progress in the arts. I first worked with Papp when I was with the National Endowment for the Arts (1965-69) and he was a constant and persistent applicant for projects at the New York Shakespeare Festival. He always asked for the precise amount of funds needed and never exceeded the budget.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 2012 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
In 1985 I began working with producer Joseph Papp on "Free for All," an oral history of the celebrated New York Shakespeare Festival/Public Theater. I ended up interviewing more than 160 individuals, including actors known for their powerful personalities, like James Earl Jones, Tommy Lee Jones and George C. Scott. But no one I talked to made more of an impression than Charles Durning. Durning, who died Dec. 24 at age 89, appeared in numerous plays and films, and he was equally at home in dramas like "That Championship Season" and "Dog Day Afternoon" or comedies like "Tootsie.
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NEWS
November 1, 1991 | TERRY PRISTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joseph Papp, a giant of the American stage who brought free open-air productions of Shakespeare to two generations of theatergoers, created the nation's most important showcase for new playwrights and launched such Broadway hits as "A Chorus Line" and "Hair," died Thursday in his New York City apartment. Papp, who had suffered from prostate cancer for five years, was 70.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 2012 | By Deborah Vankin
Academy Award-winning actress Meryl Streep has gifted New York's Public Theater with $1 million. The donation -- in honor of her mentor and Public Theater's founder, Joseph Papp, as well as writer-director Nora Ephron -- was announced Thursday evening at a private reception celebrating the completion of Public Theater's newly renovated (to the tune of $40 million) Astor Place home. Streep is a longtime alumna of Public Theater, which produces Shakespeare and the classics as well as musicals and contemporary and experimental theater.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 1991 | SYLVIE DRAKE, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
Joseph Papp's death Thursday was not unexpected. The founder and charismatic leader of the New York Shakespeare Festival (also known as the Public Theater) had been suffering from cancer for some time. He had put his affairs in order recently by appointing JoAnne Akalaitis his successor at the Public. He was the quintessential fighter, although nothing had shaken his spirit more in the last few months, when he was already ailing, than the death from AIDS of a son he adored.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 1991 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
New York Shakespeare Festival founder Joseph Papp, ill with cancer and distraught over the death of his son, has relinquished his administrative duties effective immediately, the festival said Wednesday. A spokesman said Papp had appointed JoAnne Akalaitis, a prominent stage director and Papp's artistic associate, to replace him as artistic director.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 1987 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Broadway producer Joseph Papp was presented with the Paul Robeson Award by Actors Equity in a New York ceremony late Friday. Paul Robeson Jr., the son of the late politically controversial black baritone, was on hand to give the award to Papp at the Martin Luther King Jr. Labor Center. Papp has produced more than 350 plays and musicals during his career.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 1990 | Associated Press
Theatrical impresario Joseph Papp has rejected a $50,000 National Endowment of the Arts grant, saying he will not accept the restrictions on obscenity the agency has imposed since October, a published report said today. Papp, director of the New York Shakespeare Festival, had been offered the federal grant to help underwrite the Festival Latino, a monthlong program of Latin American theater, music and films set for August, The New York Times reported in today's editions.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 2012 | By Deborah Vankin
Academy Award-winning actress Meryl Streep has gifted New York's Public Theater with $1 million. The donation -- in honor of her mentor and Public Theater's founder, Joseph Papp, as well as writer-director Nora Ephron -- was announced Thursday evening at a private reception celebrating the completion of Public Theater's newly renovated (to the tune of $40 million) Astor Place home. Streep is a longtime alumna of Public Theater, which produces Shakespeare and the classics as well as musicals and contemporary and experimental theater.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 12, 2011 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
Regional theater wasn't a big turn-on for me when I was a theater student in the late 1980s, early 1990s. Off-Broadway was cool; off-off-Broadway was cooler. Those subscription-based behemoths scattered around the country like giant shopping malls sounded dorky to me. My view of the world beyond the five boroughs of New York City was admittedly cramped back then. I didn't realize that the theater that gave me my start, the Public Theater, was part of the very same nonprofit network my callow ignorance was prepared to completely write off. As the Public's literary intern, reading scripts all day in the complex of offices shared by head honcho Joseph Papp and his wife, literary director Gail Merrifield Papp, I had a lot to learn.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 2009 | Wendy Smith, Smith is the author of "Real Life Drama: The Group Theatre and America, 1931-1940."
The apt title of this juicy oral history, based on more than 160 interviews, simultaneously expresses a principle that guided producer-provocateur Joe Papp and the theatrical ruckus that ensued. "Free for All" is how Papp presented Shakespeare in Central Park and in mobile units that toured some of New York City's poorest, toughest neighborhoods. A free-for-all was the kind of battle he engaged in with anyone he thought stood in the way of making theater accessible to everyone.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 2004
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 1994 | Laurie Winer, Laurie Winer is The Times' theater critic
What's happening at the Joseph Papp Public Theater would make Joseph Papp sit up in his grave, throw a white silk scarf over a black cashmere coat, and light a cigar. While not the impresario's designated successor, George C. Wolfe is certainly Papp's rightful heir.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 1992 | PATRICK PACHECO, Patrick Pacheco is a free-lance writer based in New York
JoAnne Akalaitis, the artistic director of the New York Shakespeare Festival, lives only three blocks away from the organization's multistage complex in lower Manhattan. Yet, she insists on taking a taxi to the imposing stone building now named the Joseph Papp Public Theater in honor of its flamboyant founder, who died in October, 1991. For her, the daily cab ride is a minor, but no less significant, way to address her new mandate.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 1992
As a crosswords fan of many years' standing I enjoyed reading the article on the current state of the puzzle business (March 20). Besides working any newspaper crossword that crosses my path, I also subscribe to two crossword fan magazines. Besides the puzzles, these magazines contain extensive commentary and letter sections. Contrary to what Stanley Newman says about most crossworders being over 50 years old, most of the letters seem to come from younger solvers.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 1991
What will we do without Joseph Papp to give us artistic and management standards? This was a man who always delivered as promised, who never weaseled a decision or opinion, who fought for the playwright and who never faltered when risks might mean progress in the arts. I first worked with Papp when I was with the National Endowment for the Arts (1965-69) and he was a constant and persistent applicant for projects at the New York Shakespeare Festival. He always asked for the precise amount of funds needed and never exceeded the budget.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 1991 | SYLVIE DRAKE, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
Joseph Papp's death Thursday was not unexpected. The founder and charismatic leader of the New York Shakespeare Festival (also known as the Public Theater) had been suffering from cancer for some time. He had put his affairs in order recently by appointing JoAnne Akalaitis his successor at the Public. He was the quintessential fighter, although nothing had shaken his spirit more in the last few months, when he was already ailing, than the death from AIDS of a son he adored.
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