Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsJoseph Peter Lynch
IN THE NEWS

Joseph Peter Lynch

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 1989
A Santa Ana man who had admitted to police that he killed his wife and their infant daughter in January has entered an insanity plea in Orange County Superior Court. Joseph Peter Lynch, 43, in custody at the Orange County Jail, had been treated for depression at the time of the killings. He will now be examined by court-appointed psychiatrists, which could mean a delay in his Dec. 12 trial date.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 13, 1990 | WILLIAM H. BOYER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; William H. Boyer is a regular contributor to Orange County View. and
Joe Lynch quietly shuffles into a conference room at Patton State Mental Hospital. The self-confessed killer's dark eyes instantly lock on his younger brother, Mike, who has traveled from Great Britain for this family reunion behind locked doors and barbed-wire fences. The brothers exchange short nods of recognition and break into nervous smiles as they sit at a table near a wall of dirty, tinted windows overlooking the hospital's landscaped grounds.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 1989
A 43-year-old native of Scotland pleaded not guilty Friday to two counts of murder in connection with the slayings of his wife and 13-month-old daughter, who were bludgeoned with a champagne bottle in January. The plea came during Joseph Peter Lynch's arraignment on the charges in Central Municipal Court in Santa Ana. Conviction for a double murder could bring the death penalty, prosecutors have said. Lynch has been held without bail in County Jail since his arrest on Jan. 17. Helen Lynch, a 35-year-old native of Australia, was found dead on the living room floor of the couple's Santa Ana condominium, their badly beaten daughter still in her arms at 12:30 a.m. on Jan. 17. Natalie Alexandra Lynch, who suffered massive skull fractures, was declared brain-dead 2 days later.
NEWS
May 9, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
An electrical engineer was convicted of beating his wife and 13-month-old daughter to death with an empty champagne bottle. But Orange County Superior Court Judge Francisco P. Briseno--who found Joseph Lynch, 44, guilty on two counts of second-degree murder in the deaths of his wife, Helen, 35, and their daughter, Natalie Alexandra--ruled the defendant was insane when he committed the crimes in the family's Santa Ana home. Deputy Dist. Atty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 1989 | MARIA NEWMAN, Times Staff Writer
Joseph Peter Lynch was ordered held without bail Friday morning after he was charged with two counts of murder in connection with the bludgeoning deaths of his wife and their 13-month-old daughter. Lynch, 43, looking gaunt and tired, did not enter a plea when he appeared briefly before Municipal Judge James P. Gray in Santa Ana. He stood, dressed in an orange jail-issued jumpsuit, in a section separated by wire grating from the rest of the courtroom.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 26, 1989 | MARIA NEWMAN, Times Staff Writer
Two little girls sat on a hard wooden bench Wednesday, oblivious to the mood of grief within the First Presbyterian Church in Santa Ana, while a minister spoke of two untimely deaths. "The way that they died, so unexpectedly, so unexplainedly, so unnecessarily and so tragically has touched us all, whether we knew (them) or not," said the Rev. Mike Pulsifer, pastor of the church. "Why this happened, I do not know."
NEWS
November 13, 1990 | WILLIAM H. BOYER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; William H. Boyer is a regular contributor to Orange County View. and
Joe Lynch quietly shuffles into a conference room at Patton State Mental Hospital. The self-confessed killer's dark eyes instantly lock on his younger brother, Mike, who has traveled from Great Britain for this family reunion behind locked doors and barbed-wire fences. The brothers exchange short nods of recognition and break into nervous smiles as they sit at a table near a wall of dirty, tinted windows overlooking the hospital's landscaped grounds.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1990 | JEANNE WRIGHT
Joseph Lynch, once described as a devoted family man, was found not guilty by reason of insanity Tuesday for the savage beating death of his wife and baby with a champagne bottle at their Santa Ana condominium last year. Lynch, a Scottish national, listened solemnly as Orange County Superior Court Judge Francisco Briseno first found him guilty of two counts of second-degree murder and then determined that he was insane at the time of the brutal killings.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 1990 | JEANNE WRIGHT
To almost everyone who knew him, Joseph Lynch was a devoted family man. There were family picnics with his wife and three daughters, soccer games, PTA and Girl Scout meetings and vacations to places such as Acapulco. Everything seemed perfect. But sometime in the fall of 1988 the family portrait began to crack. And on Jan. 17, 1989, it shattered in a horrifying night of violence at the family's Santa Ana apartment. Shortly after midnight Lynch called 911.
NEWS
May 9, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
An electrical engineer was convicted of beating his wife and 13-month-old daughter to death with an empty champagne bottle. But Orange County Superior Court Judge Francisco P. Briseno--who found Joseph Lynch, 44, guilty on two counts of second-degree murder in the deaths of his wife, Helen, 35, and their daughter, Natalie Alexandra--ruled the defendant was insane when he committed the crimes in the family's Santa Ana home. Deputy Dist. Atty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1990 | JEANNE WRIGHT
Joseph Lynch, once described as a devoted family man, was found not guilty by reason of insanity Tuesday for the savage beating death of his wife and baby with a champagne bottle at their Santa Ana condominium last year. Lynch, a Scottish national, listened solemnly as Orange County Superior Court Judge Francisco Briseno first found him guilty of two counts of second-degree murder and then determined that he was insane at the time of the brutal killings.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 1990 | JEANNE WRIGHT
To almost everyone who knew him, Joseph Lynch was a devoted family man. There were family picnics with his wife and three daughters, soccer games, PTA and Girl Scout meetings and vacations to places such as Acapulco. Everything seemed perfect. But sometime in the fall of 1988 the family portrait began to crack. And on Jan. 17, 1989, it shattered in a horrifying night of violence at the family's Santa Ana apartment. Shortly after midnight Lynch called 911.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 1989
A Santa Ana man who had admitted to police that he killed his wife and their infant daughter in January has entered an insanity plea in Orange County Superior Court. Joseph Peter Lynch, 43, in custody at the Orange County Jail, had been treated for depression at the time of the killings. He will now be examined by court-appointed psychiatrists, which could mean a delay in his Dec. 12 trial date.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 1989
A 43-year-old native of Scotland pleaded not guilty Friday to two counts of murder in connection with the slayings of his wife and 13-month-old daughter, who were bludgeoned with a champagne bottle in January. The plea came during Joseph Peter Lynch's arraignment on the charges in Central Municipal Court in Santa Ana. Conviction for a double murder could bring the death penalty, prosecutors have said. Lynch has been held without bail in County Jail since his arrest on Jan. 17. Helen Lynch, a 35-year-old native of Australia, was found dead on the living room floor of the couple's Santa Ana condominium, their badly beaten daughter still in her arms at 12:30 a.m. on Jan. 17. Natalie Alexandra Lynch, who suffered massive skull fractures, was declared brain-dead 2 days later.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 1989 | MARIA NEWMAN, Times Staff Writer
Joseph Lynch, accused of killing his wife and infant daughter with a champagne bottle 2 weeks ago, is a victim in a family tragedy, not a murderer, according to his brother, who traveled from West Germany to be with him. John Lynch also said his brother's psychiatrist, who was treating Joseph Lynch for manic-depression, is partially to blame for the events of Jan. 17. "My brother is the most nonviolent man I know and he's ill and he needs help, not punishment," John Lynch said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 26, 1989 | MARIA NEWMAN, Times Staff Writer
Two little girls sat on a hard wooden bench Wednesday, oblivious to the mood of grief within the First Presbyterian Church in Santa Ana, while a minister spoke of two untimely deaths. "The way that they died, so unexpectedly, so unexplainedly, so unnecessarily and so tragically has touched us all, whether we knew (them) or not," said the Rev. Mike Pulsifer, pastor of the church. "Why this happened, I do not know."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 1989 | MARIA NEWMAN, Times Staff Writer
Joseph Lynch, accused of killing his wife and infant daughter with a champagne bottle 2 weeks ago, is a victim in a family tragedy, not a murderer, according to his brother, who traveled from West Germany to be with him. John Lynch also said his brother's psychiatrist, who was treating Joseph Lynch for manic-depression, is partially to blame for the events of Jan. 17. "My brother is the most nonviolent man I know and he's ill and he needs help, not punishment," John Lynch said.
NEWS
January 18, 1989 | From Times staff and wire service reports
Doctors were conducting neurological tests today to determine if a 13-month-old girl who was beaten with a champagne bottle was brain dead, a hospital spokesman said. Results are expected later today. Natalie Alexandra Lynch was in extremely critical condition today in the pediatric intensive care unit at Western Medical Center, said Dr. Donald Dicus, vice president of medical affairs. The infant was found at 12:30 a.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 1989 | MARIA NEWMAN, Times Staff Writer
Joseph Peter Lynch was ordered held without bail Friday morning after he was charged with two counts of murder in connection with the bludgeoning deaths of his wife and their 13-month-old daughter. Lynch, 43, looking gaunt and tired, did not enter a plea when he appeared briefly before Municipal Judge James P. Gray in Santa Ana. He stood, dressed in an orange jail-issued jumpsuit, in a section separated by wire grating from the rest of the courtroom.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|