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Joseph R Rod Canion

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BUSINESS
October 26, 1991 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an unexpected move that left analysts and industry executives groping for words, Compaq Computer's board fired company co-founder and Chief Executive Joseph R. (Rod) Canion late Thursday and replaced him with Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer Eckhard Pfeiffer. Canion, 46, has been a fixture of the personal computer industry since founding Compaq in 1982 and quickly making it the fastest-growing company in U.S. business history and the world's third-largest PC vendor.
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BUSINESS
October 26, 1991 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an unexpected move that left analysts and industry executives groping for words, Compaq Computer's board fired company co-founder and Chief Executive Joseph R. (Rod) Canion late Thursday and replaced him with Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer Eckhard Pfeiffer. Canion, 46, has been a fixture of the personal computer industry since founding Compaq in 1982 and quickly making it the fastest-growing company in U.S. business history and the world's third-largest PC vendor.
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BUSINESS
May 16, 1991 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fundamental changes in the personal computer business have finally caught up with once-high-flying Compaq Computer, which said Wednesday that second-quarter earnings would be less than one-fourth of what they were a year ago as a result of a weak economy and problems among computer retailers. The unexpected announcement sent the Houston-based company's stock down a stunning 27% and raised disturbing questions about the firm's long-term positioning in the volatile PC industry.
BUSINESS
June 16, 1991 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Once upon a time, choosing a computer system was like getting married: It implied a long-term commitment to the chosen partner that could be reversed only at great cost. Computer companies didn't sell products, they sold information lifestyles that included the machine itself, software, peripherals, cables, maintenance--and plenty of profit was built in all along the way. Ten years ago, International Business Machine Corp. began to change all that with its personal computer.
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