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Joseph Ratzinger

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WORLD
March 13, 2013 | By Emily Alpert
Roman Catholic cardinals chose Jorge Mario Bergoglio as pope Wednesday, selecting the Argentine Jesuit to succeed Pope Benedict XVI, who resigned Feb. 28, and lead 1.2 billion church followers around the globe. He was chosen after five rounds of voting in the Sistine Chapel. Bergoglio, who chose the papal name Francis I, is the first Jesuit pope and has spent nearly his entire career in Argentina, overseeing churches and shoe-leather priests. The Associated Press described him as a modernizer who has lived austerely.
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WORLD
March 16, 2013 | By Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
VATICAN CITY - Two popes? Before Benedict XVI resigned last month, the last pope to do so was Gregory XII in 1415. Gregory acted to end the wrenching and violent Great Schism of the Roman Catholic Church, when more than one man claimed St. Peter's throne. What's happening today is completely different; no one is fighting over the chair. Yet Benedict's decision has resulted in hand-wringing over the unprecedented-in-modern-times specter of two men in white cassocks living, figuratively speaking, under the same Vatican roof: newly appointed Pope Francis and Pope Emeritus Benedict.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2012 | by David Ng
Pope Benedict XVI attended a classical concert Wednesday that doubled as a political event in which the leader of the Catholic Church called for peace in the Middle East. Conductor Daniel Barenboim led members of the West-Eastern Divan Orchestra, a group comprised of Israeli and Arab musicians. The private concert featured performances of Beethoven's Symphony No. 5 and 6, and was intended to celebrate the feast day of St. Benedict. The event was held at the Pope's summer retreat in Castel Gandolfo, Italy, south of Rome.
WORLD
March 13, 2013 | By Tom Kington, Los Angeles Times
VATICAN CITY - Andrea Quintarelli had rushed to St. Peter's Square with his sister Wednesday the moment he heard that the papal conclave had made a selection. Despite describing himself as "not a churchgoer," the 21-year-old felt that as a proud resident of Rome he had to join the thousands gathered to see the new pope the moment he emerged. "This is a once in a lifetime, emotional moment," he said. "Romans have a special relationship with the pope and I will never forget how John Paul II used Roman dialect.
NEWS
February 26, 2013 | By Michael McGough
Although they have been quiet about it, conservative Roman Catholics have reservations about Pope Benedict XVI's impending departure completely unrelated to their sadness at losing a pastor they admire. Those misgivings are likely to be exacerbated by the news that Benedict will be known officially as “pope emeritus” or “Roman pontiff emeritus.” Although a papal resignation is provided for in church law, Benedict's decision undermines the mystique of papal uniqueness.
WORLD
February 26, 2013 | By Henry Chu
VATICAN CITY -- The Vatican settled the question of what you call a retired pontiff by announcing Tuesday that after he steps down from office later this week, Pope Benedict XVI will bear the title "pope emeritus" or "Roman pontiff emeritus. " The outgoing pope will also continue to be addressed as "His Holiness" and will keep the name Benedict XVI rather than return to being called Joseph Ratzinger. He will still be robed in white, a simple cassock with no adornments. But Benedict, an inveterate shoe lover, will swap his red shoes for brown ones that he spotted and liked in Mexico.
OPINION
February 12, 2013
In nearly eight years as pope, Benedict XVI embraced a traditionalist - and to many critics, authoritarian - view of both the papacy and of church teaching. So it's ironic that he will be remembered for his revolutionary decision to relinquish the Chair of St. Peter rather than die in office, the first such abdication in nearly 600 years. Benedict's announcement Monday that he will retire at 85 because his "strength of mind and body" had deteriorated reflects an admirable acknowledgment of the reality of physical decline.
WORLD
March 16, 2013 | By Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
VATICAN CITY - Two popes? Before Benedict XVI resigned last month, the last pope to do so was Gregory XII in 1415. Gregory acted to end the wrenching and violent Great Schism of the Roman Catholic Church, when more than one man claimed St. Peter's throne. What's happening today is completely different; no one is fighting over the chair. Yet Benedict's decision has resulted in hand-wringing over the unprecedented-in-modern-times specter of two men in white cassocks living, figuratively speaking, under the same Vatican roof: newly appointed Pope Francis and Pope Emeritus Benedict.
WORLD
March 16, 2010 | By Kate Connolly
Several German Catholic organizations Tuesday urged Pope Benedict XVI to speak out about a case involving a priest suspected of child abuse while the pontiff was archbishop in his native Bavaria. Dirk Taenzler, head of the Union of German Catholic Youth, said the widespread scandal facing the Roman Catholic Church in Germany, Ireland and elsewhere amounted to "the biggest crisis the church has faced since 1945," referring to criticism that the church did not do enough to prevent the Holocaust.
WORLD
March 13, 2013 | By Tom Kington, Los Angeles Times
VATICAN CITY - Andrea Quintarelli had rushed to St. Peter's Square with his sister Wednesday the moment he heard that the papal conclave had made a selection. Despite describing himself as "not a churchgoer," the 21-year-old felt that as a proud resident of Rome he had to join the thousands gathered to see the new pope the moment he emerged. "This is a once in a lifetime, emotional moment," he said. "Romans have a special relationship with the pope and I will never forget how John Paul II used Roman dialect.
WORLD
March 13, 2013 | By Emily Alpert
Roman Catholic cardinals chose Jorge Mario Bergoglio as pope Wednesday, selecting the Argentine Jesuit to succeed Pope Benedict XVI, who resigned Feb. 28, and lead 1.2 billion church followers around the globe. He was chosen after five rounds of voting in the Sistine Chapel. Bergoglio, who chose the papal name Francis I, is the first Jesuit pope and has spent nearly his entire career in Argentina, overseeing churches and shoe-leather priests. The Associated Press described him as a modernizer who has lived austerely.
NEWS
February 26, 2013 | By Michael McGough
Although they have been quiet about it, conservative Roman Catholics have reservations about Pope Benedict XVI's impending departure completely unrelated to their sadness at losing a pastor they admire. Those misgivings are likely to be exacerbated by the news that Benedict will be known officially as “pope emeritus” or “Roman pontiff emeritus.” Although a papal resignation is provided for in church law, Benedict's decision undermines the mystique of papal uniqueness.
WORLD
February 26, 2013 | By Henry Chu
VATICAN CITY -- The Vatican settled the question of what you call a retired pontiff by announcing Tuesday that after he steps down from office later this week, Pope Benedict XVI will bear the title "pope emeritus" or "Roman pontiff emeritus. " The outgoing pope will also continue to be addressed as "His Holiness" and will keep the name Benedict XVI rather than return to being called Joseph Ratzinger. He will still be robed in white, a simple cassock with no adornments. But Benedict, an inveterate shoe lover, will swap his red shoes for brown ones that he spotted and liked in Mexico.
OPINION
February 12, 2013
In nearly eight years as pope, Benedict XVI embraced a traditionalist - and to many critics, authoritarian - view of both the papacy and of church teaching. So it's ironic that he will be remembered for his revolutionary decision to relinquish the Chair of St. Peter rather than die in office, the first such abdication in nearly 600 years. Benedict's announcement Monday that he will retire at 85 because his "strength of mind and body" had deteriorated reflects an admirable acknowledgment of the reality of physical decline.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 2012 | by David Ng
Pope Benedict XVI attended a classical concert Wednesday that doubled as a political event in which the leader of the Catholic Church called for peace in the Middle East. Conductor Daniel Barenboim led members of the West-Eastern Divan Orchestra, a group comprised of Israeli and Arab musicians. The private concert featured performances of Beethoven's Symphony No. 5 and 6, and was intended to celebrate the feast day of St. Benedict. The event was held at the Pope's summer retreat in Castel Gandolfo, Italy, south of Rome.
WORLD
March 16, 2010 | By Kate Connolly
Several German Catholic organizations Tuesday urged Pope Benedict XVI to speak out about a case involving a priest suspected of child abuse while the pontiff was archbishop in his native Bavaria. Dirk Taenzler, head of the Union of German Catholic Youth, said the widespread scandal facing the Roman Catholic Church in Germany, Ireland and elsewhere amounted to "the biggest crisis the church has faced since 1945," referring to criticism that the church did not do enough to prevent the Holocaust.
WORLD
April 18, 2005 | Tracy Wilkinson and Richard Boudreaux, Times Staff Writers
The subtle campaign to succeed Pope John Paul II, a condensed season of hushed conversations and private reflection, gives way in earnest today to the effort to elect a new leader for the Roman Catholic Church. Solemnly, 115 red-cloaked cardinals will say Mass and then gather in the Sistine Chapel for a ritualistic, secret meeting known as a conclave. Within a few hours, they will begin dropping ballots into silver, bronze and gold-plated urns. It takes 77 votes to get elected.
WORLD
April 18, 2005 | Tracy Wilkinson and Richard Boudreaux, Times Staff Writers
The subtle campaign to succeed Pope John Paul II, a condensed season of hushed conversations and private reflection, gives way in earnest today to the effort to elect a new leader for the Roman Catholic Church. Solemnly, 115 red-cloaked cardinals will say Mass and then gather in the Sistine Chapel for a ritualistic, secret meeting known as a conclave. Within a few hours, they will begin dropping ballots into silver, bronze and gold-plated urns. It takes 77 votes to get elected.
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