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Joseph Rotblat

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 2005 | John Daniszewski, Times Staff Writer
Joseph Rotblat, the Polish-born atomic scientist who quit the World War II Manhattan Project because of his horror at the prospect of nuclear wars and later won the Nobel Peace Prize for work over six decades to promote disarmament, has died. He was 96. Rotblat died Wednesday in his sleep at his home in London, a spokesman said. No cause of death was given.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 2005 | John Daniszewski, Times Staff Writer
Joseph Rotblat, the Polish-born atomic scientist who quit the World War II Manhattan Project because of his horror at the prospect of nuclear wars and later won the Nobel Peace Prize for work over six decades to promote disarmament, has died. He was 96. Rotblat died Wednesday in his sleep at his home in London, a spokesman said. No cause of death was given.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 1997
Your June 23 editorial, "Nuclear Specter Haunts Us Still," is absolutely right. Even though START II and START III treaties require substantial nuclear reductions, the U.S. and Russia will retain enough nuclear power to destroy each other many times over. And there is no guarantee that nuclear weapons will never be used. Joseph Rotblat, president of the Pugwash group of scientists and winner of the 1995 Nobel Peace Prize, put it very well: "If we were stupid enough--or mad enough--to accumulate [70,000 nuclear warheads]
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 1997
Your June 23 editorial, "Nuclear Specter Haunts Us Still," is absolutely right. Even though START II and START III treaties require substantial nuclear reductions, the U.S. and Russia will retain enough nuclear power to destroy each other many times over. And there is no guarantee that nuclear weapons will never be used. Joseph Rotblat, president of the Pugwash group of scientists and winner of the 1995 Nobel Peace Prize, put it very well: "If we were stupid enough--or mad enough--to accumulate [70,000 nuclear warheads]
NEWS
October 14, 1995 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the New Mexican desert during World War II, young Polish physicist Joseph Rotblat worked on the Manhattan Project that built the first atomic bomb. Ever since, he has campaigned tirelessly and often controversially to keep the genie of mass destruction from escaping again. On Friday, Rotblat and the loose association of maverick scientists he heads divided the million-dollar 1995 Nobel Peace Prize.
NEWS
October 14, 1995 | Associated Press
When the Nobel committee announced Friday that Joseph Rotblat and his Pugwash Conferences won the 1995 peace prize, many immediately asked, "Pugwhat?" "Pugwhere" would have been more precise. Pugwash is a fishing village of 775 people in western Nova Scotia, Canada, where scientists first got together in 1957 to try to protect humanity from their own inventions, namely nuclear weapons. The Pugwash Conferences are now held in the village every third year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Martin D. Kaplan, 89, a health researcher and former secretary-general of the Nobel Peace Prize-winning Pugwash conference on disarmament, died Oct. 16 at a hospital in Geneva, his daughter, Alexa Kaplan Intrator, told Associated Press on Tuesday. The cause of death was not announced. A veterinarian from Philadelphia, Kaplan published more than 150 papers on topics such as rabies, influenza and tropical maladies while working for the World Health Organization for more than 50 years.
NEWS
October 15, 1996 | From Reuters
An unrepentant Mordechai Vanunu, the technician most Israelis still brand a traitor for revealing nuclear arms secrets, told an international conference seeking his release Monday, "I am happy for revealing what I revealed." Actress Susannah York read Vanunu's one-line statement, which was smuggled out of the prison where he has spent 10 years in solitary confinement, to a conference in Israel called to demand his release.
NATIONAL
October 10, 2009
The following statement was issued by the Norwegian Nobel Committee on the awarding of the Nobel Peace Prize to President Obama: The Norwegian Nobel Committee has decided that the Nobel Peace Prize for 2009 is to be awarded to President Barack Obama for his extraordinary efforts to strengthen international diplomacy and cooperation between peoples. The Committee has attached special importance to Obama's vision of and work for a world without nuclear weapons. Obama has as president created a new climate in international politics.
NEWS
October 12, 1996 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a surprise move, the 1996 Nobel Peace Prize was awarded Friday to two largely unknown figures struggling for human rights in a conflict that much of the world knows little about. The Norwegian Nobel Committee, acting with its usual secrecy until its announcement, gave the much-coveted award to Roman Catholic Bishop Carlos Filipe Ximenes Belo, 48, and political activist Jose Ramos-Horta, 51, two leading figures pressing to bring peace to the troubled Asian region of East Timor.
NEWS
October 14, 1995 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the New Mexican desert during World War II, young Polish physicist Joseph Rotblat worked on the Manhattan Project that built the first atomic bomb. Ever since, he has campaigned tirelessly and often controversially to keep the genie of mass destruction from escaping again. On Friday, Rotblat and the loose association of maverick scientists he heads divided the million-dollar 1995 Nobel Peace Prize.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 25, 1995 | CONN NUGENT, Conn Nugent is president of the Liberty Tree Alliance, a Washington-based network of writers and artists working on long-term environmental issues
It's official: The CIA has admitted to Congress that Aldrich Ames and the KGB fooled the American intelligence establishment into thinking that the Soviets had more and better weapons than they really had. Between 1984 and 1994, said CIA Director John Deutch, a disinformation campaign hoodwinked Washington with a Potemkin village arms buildup. I confess. I too was a victim of KGB disinformation. Or so I was told by the CIA victims of KGB disinformation.
OPINION
August 2, 2006 | MAX BOOT, MAX BOOT is a senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations.
I HAPPENED TO BE in London last week when the Independent newspaper ran a front-page petition calling for "a cease-fire now," signed by a cross-section of the smoked-salmon socialist set -- various retired ambassadors, human rights lawyers and creative geniuses such as Peter Gabriel and Harold Pinter. Which conflict were they trying to end? Not the one in Iraq, where fighting among sectarian militias is killing 100 people a day.
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