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Joseph Santoro

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NEWS
November 5, 1989 | SIOK-HIAN TAY KELLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joseph Santoro was giving a haircut in his Monterey Park barbershop one evening 23 years ago when a customer suggested he join the local police reserves. He held a high school diploma, a certificate from barber college, and memories of police encounters that weren't quite pleasant. He said yes.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 1992
California Chief Justice Malcolm M. Lucas this week confirmed the appointment of the Monrovia police chief to the recently formed Commission on the Future of the Courts. Police Chief Joseph A. Santoro will serve as a member of the panel's committee on crime, said Monrovia Police Sgt. Jay Olos. The panel will identify long-term trends in the judicial system, focusing on goals for 2020.
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NEWS
April 29, 1986
The chief backer of a controversial plan to make English the official language of the ethnically mixed city of Monterey Park was arrested after he struck a police officer during a City Council meeting. Witnesses said Mayor G. Monty Manibog ordered Frank J. Arcuri, 45, removed when he tried to raise the question of his English-only proposal. But when police Capt. Joseph Santoro tried to remove him, police said, Arcuri struck Santoro in the face with his elbow.
NEWS
November 5, 1989 | SIOK-HIAN TAY KELLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joseph Santoro was giving a haircut in his Monterey Park barbershop one evening 23 years ago when a customer suggested he join the local police reserves. He held a high school diploma, a certificate from barber college, and memories of police encounters that weren't quite pleasant. He said yes.
NEWS
October 19, 1989
Capt. Joseph Santoro, (who was named Monrovia police chief, Times, Oct. 7), you may not have been the political choice, but you certainly were the people's choice. That's evident by your dedication and over 1,000 signatures presented to the City Council (they represent the people, so they claim). Unfortunately you can't take that to the bank. But, Capt. Santoro, you can walk proud knowing the people of Monterey Park respect, trust and love you. Monterey Park's loss is Monrovia's win. On behalf of the residents whom you have served so well for 22 years we thank you. Good luck, Chief.
NEWS
February 23, 1989
When the Monterey Park City Council gave approval to the city manager to spend $15,500 to hire a consultant to find the best man to serve as our police chief, I thought: "They must be blind. They have the best man and can't see it." Now the residents are speaking up on behalf of Capt. Joseph Santoro against his wishes. I must conclude (that) the council must also be deaf. I hope the council is not also dumb. The citizens are not buying the story that the council has no say as to who becomes our next police chief.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 1992
California Chief Justice Malcolm M. Lucas this week confirmed the appointment of the Monrovia police chief to the recently formed Commission on the Future of the Courts. Police Chief Joseph A. Santoro will serve as a member of the panel's committee on crime, said Monrovia Police Sgt. Jay Olos. The panel will identify long-term trends in the judicial system, focusing on goals for 2020.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 1989
Monterey Park Police Capt. Joseph Santoro has been named the next chief of the Monrovia Police Department. Santoro, 46, will take over Oct. 30, when Chief William Tubbs retires. He will earn between $55,440 and $72,000. Officials refused to release the exact figure. A 16-year veteran of the Monterey Park department and division commander since 1986, Santoro was named to the Monrovia post after a seven-month effort by an executive search firm, said Monrovia City Manager James Starbird.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 1989 | BERKLEY HUDSON, Times Staff Writer
A Monterey Park police officer fatally shot one of four suspects after they fled late Wednesday from a house where an 11-year-old boy and his 16-year-old sister were held at gunpoint while their residence was being ransacked. Before being discovered by the intruders--who police described as part of a growing number of Vietnamese preying upon others of Vietnamese descent--the girl had used a portable phone to call the 911 emergency number. The case, Monterey Park police said, draws attention to Asian immigrants victimizing others of Asian ancestry who, for cultural reasons, sometimes mistrust police and fear calling authorities for help.
NEWS
May 25, 1989 | BERKLEY HUDSON, Times Staff Writer
Fifty neighborhood block-watch captains let out a collective "Wow!" when they saw the crime computer work. A bunch of green 4s blipped across a computer screen. The numbers were overlayed on a road map of one section of the city, each one symbolizing an auto theft during the first three months of 1989. The block captains watched this pattern of crime unfold during a test-run of the Police Department's new computer system earlier this month. Patterns Pop Up After two years of planning and computer programming, Monterey Park police have declared the system ready.
NEWS
October 19, 1989
Capt. Joseph Santoro, (who was named Monrovia police chief, Times, Oct. 7), you may not have been the political choice, but you certainly were the people's choice. That's evident by your dedication and over 1,000 signatures presented to the City Council (they represent the people, so they claim). Unfortunately you can't take that to the bank. But, Capt. Santoro, you can walk proud knowing the people of Monterey Park respect, trust and love you. Monterey Park's loss is Monrovia's win. On behalf of the residents whom you have served so well for 22 years we thank you. Good luck, Chief.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 1989
Monterey Park Police Capt. Joseph Santoro has been named the next chief of the Monrovia Police Department. Santoro, 46, will take over Oct. 30, when Chief William Tubbs retires. He will earn between $55,440 and $72,000. Officials refused to release the exact figure. A 16-year veteran of the Monterey Park department and division commander since 1986, Santoro was named to the Monrovia post after a seven-month effort by an executive search firm, said Monrovia City Manager James Starbird.
NEWS
June 25, 1989 | BERKLEY HUDSON, Times Staff Writer
As she cruised by the Hong Kong Super Market, Officer Judy Lesinsky spotted a seafood delivery truck that blocked not just one, but two handicapped parking spaces. "That's definitely a violation," Lesinsky said. As she stepped from her vehicle, she carried not the traditional ticket pad, but a hand-held computer. Lesinsky punched a series of fingertip-sized keys, answering programmed questions. The computer automatically recorded the time and date on its two-line display screen.
NEWS
May 25, 1989 | BERKLEY HUDSON, Times Staff Writer
Fifty neighborhood block-watch captains let out a collective "Wow!" when they saw the crime computer work. A bunch of green 4s blipped across a computer screen. The numbers were overlayed on a road map of one section of the city, each one symbolizing an auto theft during the first three months of 1989. The block captains watched this pattern of crime unfold during a test-run of the Police Department's new computer system earlier this month. Patterns Pop Up After two years of planning and computer programming, Monterey Park police have declared the system ready.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 1989 | BERKLEY HUDSON, Times Staff Writer
A Monterey Park police officer fatally shot one of four suspects after they fled late Wednesday from a house where an 11-year-old boy and his 16-year-old sister were held at gunpoint while their residence was being ransacked. Before being discovered by the intruders--who police described as part of a growing number of Vietnamese preying upon others of Vietnamese descent--the girl had used a portable phone to call the 911 emergency number. The case, Monterey Park police said, draws attention to Asian immigrants victimizing others of Asian ancestry who, for cultural reasons, sometimes mistrust police and fear calling authorities for help.
NEWS
February 23, 1989
When the Monterey Park City Council gave approval to the city manager to spend $15,500 to hire a consultant to find the best man to serve as our police chief, I thought: "They must be blind. They have the best man and can't see it." Now the residents are speaking up on behalf of Capt. Joseph Santoro against his wishes. I must conclude (that) the council must also be deaf. I hope the council is not also dumb. The citizens are not buying the story that the council has no say as to who becomes our next police chief.
NEWS
June 25, 1989 | BERKLEY HUDSON, Times Staff Writer
As she cruised by the Hong Kong Super Market, Officer Judy Lesinsky spotted a seafood delivery truck that blocked not just one, but two handicapped parking spaces. "That's definitely a violation," Lesinsky said. As she stepped from her vehicle, she carried not the traditional ticket pad, but a hand-held computer. Lesinsky punched a series of fingertip-sized keys, answering programmed questions. The computer automatically recorded the time and date on its two-line display screen.
NEWS
January 23, 1992
The Police Department has been awarded a state grant to help officers identify and prosecute "career criminals." Police Chief Joseph Santoro said a combination of funds from the city and the California Office of Criminal Justice Planning will be received over four years, beginning July 1. During that time, the state will contribute $378,000 and the city will give $92,000, Santoro said. The money will pay for a crime analysis unit with computer equipment and two staff members.
NEWS
April 29, 1986
The chief backer of a controversial plan to make English the official language of the ethnically mixed city of Monterey Park was arrested after he struck a police officer during a City Council meeting. Witnesses said Mayor G. Monty Manibog ordered Frank J. Arcuri, 45, removed when he tried to raise the question of his English-only proposal. But when police Capt. Joseph Santoro tried to remove him, police said, Arcuri struck Santoro in the face with his elbow.
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