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August 2, 2003 | From Reuters
Soviet dictator Joseph Stalin was so outraged at the anti-communism of film star John Wayne that he plotted to have him murdered, according to a new biography of the American actor. "John Wayne -- The Man Behind the Myth" by British writer and actor Michael Munn says that there were several attempts in the late 1940s and early 1950s to kill the man known to audiences around the world as "Duke."
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NEWS
March 5, 2014 | By Seema Mehta and Chris Megerian
Republican gubernatorial candidate Tim Donnelly is standing by his comparison of President Obama's gun control policies to those of Adolf Hitler, Joseph Stalin, Kim Jong Il and other dictators, saying that government encroachment on citizens' rights amounted to tyranny. “Tyranny is the daily purpose of dictators, and I will not apologize for pointing out that our current president acts more like a dictator than a leader of a free people in a Constitutional Republic,” Donnelly said Tuesday in an emailed statement.
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NEWS
December 6, 1999 | MERLE RUBIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In a scene from Richard Lourie's novel "The Autobiography of Joseph Stalin," Stalin, not yet sole dictator of Soviet Russia but tirelessly working his way to the top of the new power structure, has been put in charge of ensuring that reluctant farmers in the south send their grain to feed hungry proletarians in the north. Stalin is a man who gets the job done, no matter what.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 2005
How very lovely that Mark Swed so enjoyed the pretty and soothing songs based on the works of the great Chilean poet Pablo Neruda, winner of the 1953 Stalin Prize ["Love and Hate, Juxtaposed," May 23]. But, oh, how very unpleasant for Swed that the love poems had to end, whereupon he was forced to endure Shostakovich's Tenth Symphony, which he describes as a "gargantuan hate poem to [Shostakovich's] political nemesis," the late Joseph Stalin. The music "is angry, bitter, tragic." Gee, Mark, why do you think Dmitri was so bummed out?
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 1991 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Upcoming on HBO: Oscar winner Robert Duvall will portray Soviet leader Joseph Stalin in an upcoming HBO miniseries that will go into production in October in Moscow and Budapest. . . . The pay cable service also announced Tuesday that "Godfather of Soul" James Brown and rap star M. C. Hammer will be featured on the first segment of HBO's new music series, "Influences," debuting in September.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 2005
How very lovely that Mark Swed so enjoyed the pretty and soothing songs based on the works of the great Chilean poet Pablo Neruda, winner of the 1953 Stalin Prize ["Love and Hate, Juxtaposed," May 23]. But, oh, how very unpleasant for Swed that the love poems had to end, whereupon he was forced to endure Shostakovich's Tenth Symphony, which he describes as a "gargantuan hate poem to [Shostakovich's] political nemesis," the late Joseph Stalin. The music "is angry, bitter, tragic." Gee, Mark, why do you think Dmitri was so bummed out?
NEWS
February 2, 1988 | WILLIAM J. EATON, Times Staff Writer
Georgy M. Malenkov, who briefly succeeded Joseph Stalin as leader of the Soviet Union in 1953, has died, a government spokesman disclosed Monday. Malenkov, who was 86, died about 10 days ago but his death was not announced earlier at the request of his relatives, according to Foreign Ministry spokesman Gennady I. Gerasimov.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 1995 | JULIE FIELDS
In 1941, shortly after Hitler's troops invaded the Soviet Union, a young Russian interpreter in the Berlin embassy suddenly found himself both a diplomat and spy behind enemy lines. Assigned to negotiate the fate of Soviet citizens living in Berlin, Valentin M. Berezhkov could travel only under the watch of Hitler's S. S. guards. Still, he helped smuggle a suitcase containing a radio transmitter to an underground network of anti-Nazi Germans. "I was afraid the S. S.
NEWS
March 5, 2014 | By Seema Mehta and Chris Megerian
Republican gubernatorial candidate Tim Donnelly is standing by his comparison of President Obama's gun control policies to those of Adolf Hitler, Joseph Stalin, Kim Jong Il and other dictators, saying that government encroachment on citizens' rights amounted to tyranny. “Tyranny is the daily purpose of dictators, and I will not apologize for pointing out that our current president acts more like a dictator than a leader of a free people in a Constitutional Republic,” Donnelly said Tuesday in an emailed statement.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 1992 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
In 1930, German journalist Paul Scheffer observed about being in the presence of Joseph Stalin: "You feel at once that he is dangerous." So, too, do you instantly feel that the epic 20th-Century despot ably depicted by Robert Duvall in HBO's "Stalin" is someone to fear deeply. It lasts from the moment you meet him being rejected for World War I service in the czar's crumbling army until his death in 1953, surrounded by toadies at his dacha at Kuntsevo.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 2003 | From Reuters
Soviet dictator Joseph Stalin was so outraged at the anti-communism of film star John Wayne that he plotted to have him murdered, according to a new biography of the American actor. "John Wayne -- The Man Behind the Myth" by British writer and actor Michael Munn says that there were several attempts in the late 1940s and early 1950s to kill the man known to audiences around the world as "Duke."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 2003 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
"L'Chayim, Comrade Stalin!" tells a cross-cultural story as dizzying as its title. Energetic and informative, albeit more than a little haphazard, Yale Strom's new documentary explores an unexpected aspect of the intertwined 20th century histories of the Soviet Union and the Jewish people.
NEWS
December 6, 1999 | MERLE RUBIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In a scene from Richard Lourie's novel "The Autobiography of Joseph Stalin," Stalin, not yet sole dictator of Soviet Russia but tirelessly working his way to the top of the new power structure, has been put in charge of ensuring that reluctant farmers in the south send their grain to feed hungry proletarians in the north. Stalin is a man who gets the job done, no matter what.
NEWS
July 2, 1999 | ANTHONY DAY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The murder of the Soviet party chief in Leningrad, Sergei Kirov, on Dec. 1, 1934, led to one of the great crimes of modern history, Joseph Stalin's reign of terror in the Soviet Union that left enormous numbers dead, several million imprisoned in the grim labor camps and a vast nation numbed by fear into silence. "Who Killed Kirov?" asks the question that was on the minds of many Soviets from the very beginning.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 1995 | JULIE FIELDS
In 1941, shortly after Hitler's troops invaded the Soviet Union, a young Russian interpreter in the Berlin embassy suddenly found himself both a diplomat and spy behind enemy lines. Assigned to negotiate the fate of Soviet citizens living in Berlin, Valentin M. Berezhkov could travel only under the watch of Hitler's S. S. guards. Still, he helped smuggle a suitcase containing a radio transmitter to an underground network of anti-Nazi Germans. "I was afraid the S. S.
NEWS
April 17, 1994 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The sound stages at CBS Studios in Hollywood, the home of daytime game shows and soap operas, have quite literally been invaded by the lavish production "'World War II: When Lions Roared." The four-hour NBC drama stars three lions of the acting profession: Michael Caine as Joseph Stalin, Bob Hoskins as Winston Churchill and John Lithgow as Franklin Roosevelt. Written and produced by David W.
NEWS
April 17, 1994 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The sound stages at CBS Studios in Hollywood, the home of daytime game shows and soap operas, have quite literally been invaded by the lavish production "'World War II: When Lions Roared." The four-hour NBC drama stars three lions of the acting profession: Michael Caine as Joseph Stalin, Bob Hoskins as Winston Churchill and John Lithgow as Franklin Roosevelt. Written and produced by David W.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 2003 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
"L'Chayim, Comrade Stalin!" tells a cross-cultural story as dizzying as its title. Energetic and informative, albeit more than a little haphazard, Yale Strom's new documentary explores an unexpected aspect of the intertwined 20th century histories of the Soviet Union and the Jewish people.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 1992 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
In 1930, German journalist Paul Scheffer observed about being in the presence of Joseph Stalin: "You feel at once that he is dangerous." So, too, do you instantly feel that the epic 20th-Century despot ably depicted by Robert Duvall in HBO's "Stalin" is someone to fear deeply. It lasts from the moment you meet him being rejected for World War I service in the czar's crumbling army until his death in 1953, surrounded by toadies at his dacha at Kuntsevo.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 1991 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Upcoming on HBO: Oscar winner Robert Duvall will portray Soviet leader Joseph Stalin in an upcoming HBO miniseries that will go into production in October in Moscow and Budapest. . . . The pay cable service also announced Tuesday that "Godfather of Soul" James Brown and rap star M. C. Hammer will be featured on the first segment of HBO's new music series, "Influences," debuting in September.
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