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Joseph V Nash

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BUSINESS
April 21, 1992 | TOM FURLONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Pepperdine University accounting instructor Joseph V. Nash was sentenced in federal court Monday to 11 years in prison for defrauding four Southern California banking institutions of nearly $900,000. In handing down the lengthy sentence, U.S. District Judge Laughlin E. Waters described Nash as an "engaging" figure who nonetheless "was not to be trusted." The judge ordered Nash to pay $893,000 in restitution to the four financial institutions.
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BUSINESS
April 21, 1992 | TOM FURLONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former Pepperdine University accounting instructor Joseph V. Nash was sentenced in federal court Monday to 11 years in prison for defrauding four Southern California banking institutions of nearly $900,000. In handing down the lengthy sentence, U.S. District Judge Laughlin E. Waters described Nash as an "engaging" figure who nonetheless "was not to be trusted." The judge ordered Nash to pay $893,000 in restitution to the four financial institutions.
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BUSINESS
December 12, 1995 | F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal appeals court Monday threw out a 6 1/2-year prison sentence imposed on Los Angeles financier Charles W. Knapp for defrauding an Arizona thrift, saying it was too harsh a penalty in light of the evidence. The court ordered him to be resentenced. But the U.S.
BUSINESS
June 11, 1996 | THOMAS S. MULLIGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles financier Charles W. Knapp was resentenced Monday to 5 1/4 years in federal prison and was ordered to report for incarceration July 8, three years and a day after he was convicted of defrauding an Arizona savings and loan. Two others convicted in the case, Joseph V. Nash and Anthony C. Sarno, also were resentenced Monday, to 4 3/4 years and 4 1/4 years, respectively.
BUSINESS
July 9, 1993 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sherman Mazur, a onetime real estate whiz accused of engineering one of the biggest tax fraud cases in recent years, pleaded guilty to seven counts of tax and bankruptcy fraud, the U.S. attorney's office in Los Angeles said Thursday. The government's case centered around allegations that Mazur, 43, supported a lavish lifestyle by diverting cash to himself from some of the 200 real estate partnerships he ran--many of which were in bankruptcy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 16, 2001 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Paul Caruso, Los Angeles defense and divorce lawyer for about 45 years whose clients included actor and war hero Audie Murphy, boxer Art Aragon, used car dealer Ralph Williams and Charles Manson follower Susan Atkins, has died. He was 81. Caruso died Tuesday in a Los Angeles residential care facility, said his son, attorney P. Carey Caruso. "Call Paul" became a popular anthem among celebrities in trouble--whether actors, athletes or accountants--in the Los Angeles of the 1950s through the 1980s.
NEWS
July 8, 1993 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Charles W. Knapp, the financier whose business strategies led to the collapse of the nation's largest thrift in the 1980s, was found guilty Wednesday on criminal charges of lying to obtain a loan from a savings and loan in Arizona that later failed. After nearly four days of deliberations, a federal jury in Los Angeles convicted Knapp on two counts of making false statements and one count of conspiracy, but he was acquitted on a third charge of making false statements.
BUSINESS
December 15, 1993 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Charles W. Knapp, the maverick money man who once headed the nation's largest savings and loan, was sentenced Tuesday to 6 1/2 years in prison for duping an Arizona savings and loan into lending him $15 million. Knapp, 59, was also ordered to pay $11 million in restitution--a sum prosecutors claimed was the amount Western Savings & Loan in Phoenix lost on the Knapp loan. The stiff sentence, handed down by U.S. District Judge Stephen V.
NEWS
March 5, 1993 | PATRICK LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Charles W. Knapp--the former Los Angeles banker whose freewheeling ways set the stage for the failure of the nation's largest thrift--was indicted Thursday on charges that he lied to win a $15-million loan from an Arizona savings and loan that also later failed. Knapp--whom regulators forced from his job at Financial Corp.
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