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Joseph Volpe

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 2004 | Paul Lieberman, Times Staff Writer
Joseph Volpe, who took a stagehand's job at the Metropolitan Opera four decades ago to learn scenery-making -- hoping to move on to Broadway theater -- announced Tuesday that he intends to retire from the prestigious company he has been with ever since, for the last 14 years as its boss. Volpe's public announcement followed a private one to the Met's board. He gave board members plenty of time to find a successor, saying he will not leave until August 2006.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 2004 | Paul Lieberman, Times Staff Writer
Joseph Volpe, who took a stagehand's job at the Metropolitan Opera four decades ago to learn scenery-making -- hoping to move on to Broadway theater -- announced Tuesday that he intends to retire from the prestigious company he has been with ever since, for the last 14 years as its boss. Volpe's public announcement followed a private one to the Met's board. He gave board members plenty of time to find a successor, saying he will not leave until August 2006.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 1990 | WALTER PRICE
"I might as well sell my weekend house. I'll never see it again." This was the reaction of Joseph Volpe on his first day as the new general director of the New York Metropolitan Opera. Volpe was named Wednesday to run the nation's largest opera company. He will also be in charge of financial operations and public relations. At the same time Marilyn Shapiro was promoted to executive director of external affairs (in charge of fund-raising and marketing).
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 1990 | WALTER PRICE
"I might as well sell my weekend house. I'll never see it again." This was the reaction of Joseph Volpe on his first day as the new general director of the New York Metropolitan Opera. Volpe was named Wednesday to run the nation's largest opera company. He will also be in charge of financial operations and public relations. At the same time Marilyn Shapiro was promoted to executive director of external affairs (in charge of fund-raising and marketing).
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 1992 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Nyet at the Met: "Artistic differences" have caused mezzo-soprano Marilyn Horne to cancel her three scheduled performances in Rossini's "Semiramide" at the Metropolitan Opera in New York, according to the Met's general director Joseph Volpe. She will be replaced as Arsace on Jan. 7, 13 and 16 by Gloria Scalchi, who made her Met debut in that role this season.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 2003 | From Associated Press
For the first time in its 120-year history, New York's Metropolitan Opera will take a break in the middle of its season. The change at the tradition-bound Met starts with the 2004-05 season. It takes into account decreased ticket sales after the Christmas and New Year's holidays and will allow for a better rehearsal schedule, Met general manager Joseph Volpe said. With no performances at the Metropolitan Opera House during the weeks of Jan.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 2004 | From Associated Press
The Metropolitan Opera says it has extended by five years the contract of music director James Levine. "Nothing could make me happier than to continue my long association with this great company and to build on all the artistic accomplishments we have made," Levine said. Joseph Volpe, the Met's general manager, said the contract had been extended from 2006-07 through the 2010-11 season.
NEWS
January 6, 1996 | From a Times Staff Writer
Veteran Metropolitan Opera tenor Richard Versalle died Friday evening after falling 15 feet in the opening scene of a performance at Lincoln Center. The house doctor said the 62-year-old singer apparently suffered a heart attack. Versalle, playing the role of a clerk in the premiere of "The Makropulos Case" by Leos Janacek and starring soprano Jessye Norman, was on a ladder pulling a file from a wall drawer. He had just sung the line "You can only live so long" when he dropped to the stage.
NATIONAL
May 12, 2002 | From Associated Press
Luciano Pavarotti kept his fans guessing until the last minute Saturday before announcing he was too ill with the flu to perform at the Metropolitan Opera's season finale. The singer's withdrawal from the performance of Puccini's "Tosca" seemed to signal that the curtain had fallen on his Met career, which began in 1968. Met general manager Joseph Volpe said Pavarotti told him Saturday afternoon that he would perform, then called back two hours later to say he would not.
NEWS
May 22, 2003 | Diane Haithman, Times Staff Writer
It came as a shock to the opera community Tuesday when Metropolitan Opera General Manager Joseph Volpe announced that after the 2003-04 season, the name of Texaco would no longer be associated with the opera company's live Saturday radio broadcasts. The oil company, which merged with Chevron in 2000 and is now known as ChevronTexaco, has sponsored the operas for 63 years, the longest continuous commercial sponsorship in broadcast history.
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