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Joseph W Ralston

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NEWS
June 9, 1997 | From Reuters
Former 1st Lt. Kelly Flinn, who was discharged from the Air Force for having an adulterous affair, said Sunday that the treatment she received was indicative of a double standard in such cases, based on sex and rank. In a guest essay appearing in the issue of Newsweek that goes on sale today, Flinn compared her case to that of Air Force Gen. Joseph W. Ralston.
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NEWS
January 9, 1998 | Associated Press
Defense Secretary William S. Cohen intends to nominate Air Force Gen. Joseph Ralston for a second term as the nation's No. 2 military man, and Ralston has agreed to remain in the post, a Pentagon spokesman said Thursday. Ralston, a four-star general, made headlines last summer when his candidacy for the chairmanship of the Joint Chiefs of Staff was derailed after he acknowledged having an adulterous affair years ago.
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NEWS
June 8, 1997 | BRADLEY GRAHAM and DANA PRIEST, THE WASHINGTON POST
Senior Pentagon officials said Saturday they anticipate that Air Force Gen. Joseph W. Ralston, who became embroiled last week in controversy over an adulterous affair that ended nine years ago, will take his name out of the running for chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Ralston, who was Defense Secretary William S. Cohen's top choice for the job, has been traveling in central Asia and is due to return here today.
NEWS
June 10, 1997 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Air Force Gen. Joseph W. Ralston on Monday withdrew his candidacy to head the Joint Chiefs of Staff but said that he would stay on as its vice chairman, despite the uproar over his adulterous affair, which occurred 13 years ago. The former fighter pilot, who had been the favored candidate for the military's top job, spent much of the day talking with lawmakers to learn the extent of his support.
NEWS
June 5, 1997 | DANA PRIEST and BRADLEY GRAHAM, THE WASHINGTON POST
Defense Secretary William S. Cohen, saying he wanted "to draw a line" against a "frenzy" of sexual misconduct allegations, decided Wednesday to retain Air Force Gen. Joseph W. Ralston as a leading candidate to become the nation's top military commander even though Ralston had an adulterous affair 14 years ago. "We need to come back to a rule of reason instead of a rule of thumb," Cohen said in an interview Wednesday after consulting earlier in the day with President Clinton on the matter.
NEWS
June 9, 1997 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Air Force Gen. Joseph W. Ralston on Sunday returned here from Central Asia amid growing suggestions that he will withdraw his name from consideration as chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff when he meets today with Defense Secretary William S. Cohen. The move seemed virtually inevitable after key members of Congress said Sunday that Ralston would face serious hurdles winning Senate confirmation because of the controversy surrounding his admission of an adulterous affair 13 years ago.
NEWS
June 5, 1997 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The candidacy of Defense Secretary William S. Cohen's top choice as chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff was thrown into doubt Wednesday night by disclosures that the officer had conducted a year-long adulterous affair. Air Force Gen. Joseph W. Ralston, now vice chairman of the joint chiefs, broke the military's rules against adultery by carrying on the affair with a civilian Central Intelligence Agency employee in 1983-84 while he was separated from his then-wife, Pentagon officials said.
NEWS
June 6, 1997 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the civilian world, the scarlet letter has faded to a deep blush. But as the leading candidate for the nation's top military post learned Thursday, the public shame of adultery can leave a searing "A" on a service member's record and promotion prospects. At a time when almost 1 in 5 Americans admits to having had an adulterous relationship, public opinion experts say we are deeply ambivalent about marital infidelity--our own and those of our leaders.
NEWS
June 7, 1997 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a damaging blow to Air Force Gen. Joseph W. Ralston's chances of becoming chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, the Senate's Democratic leader on Friday rejected the Pentagon's argument that some cases of adultery are more serious than others. "I think the regulation and the discipline ought to be applied exactly the same in all circumstances," Sen. Tom Daschle (D-S.D.) told reporters.
NEWS
June 10, 1997 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Air Force Gen. Joseph W. Ralston on Monday withdrew his candidacy to head the Joint Chiefs of Staff but said that he would stay on as its vice chairman, despite the uproar over his adulterous affair, which occurred 13 years ago. The former fighter pilot, who had been the favored candidate for the military's top job, spent much of the day talking with lawmakers to learn the extent of his support.
NEWS
June 9, 1997 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Air Force Gen. Joseph W. Ralston on Sunday returned here from Central Asia amid growing suggestions that he will withdraw his name from consideration as chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff when he meets today with Defense Secretary William S. Cohen. The move seemed virtually inevitable after key members of Congress said Sunday that Ralston would face serious hurdles winning Senate confirmation because of the controversy surrounding his admission of an adulterous affair 13 years ago.
NEWS
June 9, 1997 | From Reuters
Former 1st Lt. Kelly Flinn, who was discharged from the Air Force for having an adulterous affair, said Sunday that the treatment she received was indicative of a double standard in such cases, based on sex and rank. In a guest essay appearing in the issue of Newsweek that goes on sale today, Flinn compared her case to that of Air Force Gen. Joseph W. Ralston.
NEWS
June 8, 1997 | BRADLEY GRAHAM and DANA PRIEST, THE WASHINGTON POST
Senior Pentagon officials said Saturday they anticipate that Air Force Gen. Joseph W. Ralston, who became embroiled last week in controversy over an adulterous affair that ended nine years ago, will take his name out of the running for chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Ralston, who was Defense Secretary William S. Cohen's top choice for the job, has been traveling in central Asia and is due to return here today.
NEWS
June 7, 1997 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a damaging blow to Air Force Gen. Joseph W. Ralston's chances of becoming chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, the Senate's Democratic leader on Friday rejected the Pentagon's argument that some cases of adultery are more serious than others. "I think the regulation and the discipline ought to be applied exactly the same in all circumstances," Sen. Tom Daschle (D-S.D.) told reporters.
NEWS
June 6, 1997 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Pentagon sought support Thursday for Defense Secretary William S. Cohen's top choice to head the Joint Chiefs of Staff--a senior officer who has admitted committing adultery--but the battle quickly widened into an effort to convince the nation that the military was not applying a double standard on sexual infractions. One day after the Pentagon's disclosure that Air Force Gen. Joseph W.
NEWS
June 6, 1997 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the civilian world, the scarlet letter has faded to a deep blush. But as the leading candidate for the nation's top military post learned Thursday, the public shame of adultery can leave a searing "A" on a service member's record and promotion prospects. At a time when almost 1 in 5 Americans admits to having had an adulterous relationship, public opinion experts say we are deeply ambivalent about marital infidelity--our own and those of our leaders.
NEWS
June 6, 1997 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Pentagon sought support Thursday for Defense Secretary William S. Cohen's top choice to head the Joint Chiefs of Staff--a senior officer who has admitted committing adultery--but the battle quickly widened into an effort to convince the nation that the military was not applying a double standard on sexual infractions. One day after the Pentagon's disclosure that Air Force Gen. Joseph W.
NEWS
January 9, 1998 | Associated Press
Defense Secretary William S. Cohen intends to nominate Air Force Gen. Joseph Ralston for a second term as the nation's No. 2 military man, and Ralston has agreed to remain in the post, a Pentagon spokesman said Thursday. Ralston, a four-star general, made headlines last summer when his candidacy for the chairmanship of the Joint Chiefs of Staff was derailed after he acknowledged having an adulterous affair years ago.
NEWS
June 5, 1997 | DANA PRIEST and BRADLEY GRAHAM, THE WASHINGTON POST
Defense Secretary William S. Cohen, saying he wanted "to draw a line" against a "frenzy" of sexual misconduct allegations, decided Wednesday to retain Air Force Gen. Joseph W. Ralston as a leading candidate to become the nation's top military commander even though Ralston had an adulterous affair 14 years ago. "We need to come back to a rule of reason instead of a rule of thumb," Cohen said in an interview Wednesday after consulting earlier in the day with President Clinton on the matter.
NEWS
June 5, 1997 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The candidacy of Defense Secretary William S. Cohen's top choice as chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff was thrown into doubt Wednesday night by disclosures that the officer had conducted a year-long adulterous affair. Air Force Gen. Joseph W. Ralston, now vice chairman of the joint chiefs, broke the military's rules against adultery by carrying on the affair with a civilian Central Intelligence Agency employee in 1983-84 while he was separated from his then-wife, Pentagon officials said.
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