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Joseph Wambaugh

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ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 2010
Hollywood Hills A Novel Joseph Wambaugh Little, Brown: 356 pp., $26.99
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 2012 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Gregory Ulas Powell, one of the notorious "Onion Field" murderers whose 1963 slaying of a Los Angeles police officer shattered the image of the invincible cop and changed police practices, has died. He was 79. Powell, who served 49 years of a life sentence, died Sunday at California Medical Facility in Vacaville, part of the state prison system, according to Lt. Andre Gonzales, a spokesman for the state Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation. He had prostate cancer. On March 10, 1963, Powell and accomplice Jimmy Lee Smith kidnapped two police officers in Hollywood and drove them to an onion field outside Bakersfield, where they killed Officer Ian James Campbell.
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MAGAZINE
April 23, 1989
I note that Wambaugh tends to blame attorneys for his legal problems ("The Crimes of Joseph Wambaugh," by Sean Mitchell, Feb. 26). I believe in and would defend Wambaugh's right to write about any subject, fiction or nonfiction, that inspires him. In exercising this right, your article estimates, Wambaugh realizes a return of about $1 million per book. Obviously, Wambaugh would like to keep exercising this right both as an expression of his creative freedom as well as for economic gain.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 2012 | By Corina Knoll, Los Angeles Times
LAPD Officer Ian Campbell's last breaths were in the dirt of a Kern County onion field. It was March 9, 1963, and he and his partner, Karl Hettinger, had been driven to the area at gunpoint. Hettinger managed to escape but Campbell was shot and killed, and his death was chronicled by author Joseph Wambaugh in his classic "The Onion Field" and a later film. Campbell's name will now be memorialized in the neighborhood that he patrolled, said L.A. city officials who on Friday dedicated a Hollywood intersection to the slain officer.
BOOKS
November 10, 1985 | John Sutherland, Sutherland teaches English at Caltech. and
Like Jack London, Joseph Wambaugh made himself a writer despite the odds against him. The outline of his career is well publicized. He was born in Pittsburgh, a policeman's son. The family background was solidly working class and Roman Catholic. When Joe was 14, they moved to Los Angeles. At 17, he joined the Marines. In 1960, he entered the LAPD and served on the force for 14 years, retiring with the rank of detective sergeant.
BOOKS
December 26, 1993 | Cassandra Smith, Cassandra Smith writes for the Los Angeles Daily Journal, a legal newspaper
No one writes novels about police work with more color, ribald comedy and affection than Joseph Wambaugh. The cops who inhabit his stories are complex anti-heroes, plagued with anxieties from living on the edge. They are burnouts and emotional casualties who take refuge from the daily parade of human wickedness in the barroom or the bedroom. Or, as in his latest novel, "Finnegan's Week," he uses his talent to entangle his characters in a farcical web of circumstances.
OPINION
July 14, 1991 | Robert Scheer, Robert Scheer is a reporter for The Times. He interviewed Joseph Wambaugh at the author's home
Joseph Wambaugh knows cops. He was one of them, retiring in 1971, as a sergeant, after 14 years in the Los Angeles Police Department. He has also made a great living writing bestsellers, both fiction and nonfiction, about cops and their cases, beginning with "The New Centurions"--written while Wambaugh was still working the burglary detail.
BOOKS
February 19, 1989 | John Sutherland
"Wambaugh, as always, tells a good story. But one cannot read 'The Blooding' without some qualms as to what is happening to British law enforcement: 'The Blooding' is reportage."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2012
BOOKS The L.A. Times Festival of Books is the premiere literary event in the Southland (and we aren't just patting ourselves on the back). This year's edition features dozens of readings, panels and events from esteemed literary figures (Henri Cole), genre mavens (Joseph Wambaugh) and salty dames (Betty White) among many, many others. Various venues at USC. Sat.-Sun., Prices vary, see events.latimes.com/festivalofbooks for full schedule.
OPINION
December 1, 2011
End of the camp Re "LAPD, protesters face off," Nov. 30 Our city must congratulate the Police Department on its excellent work in sweeping out Occupy L.A. from the City Hall lawn. The department showed the organization of a world-class army. The protesters did not have a logical reason to be at City Hall, which does not have much of a say in the nation's economy. Perhaps they should organize against corporations that outsource jobs, or they could encourage people to buy U.S.-manufactured goods.
OPINION
November 27, 2011 | By Joseph Wambaugh
In light of the terrible financial crisis at our California universities, I feel the need to rescue UC Davis, whose administrators are, according to The Times, negotiating a price with the Kroll security firm in New York for none other than former LAPD Chief Bill Bratton to fly West and tell us what went wrong on the day that students were pepper sprayed. I can save the university a hefty Kroll consulting fee by suggesting that the administrators carefully peruse a few of the newspaper articles of the past week and all will be revealed to them.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 2011
His beat included 'Police Story' Popular novelist Joseph Wambaugh burst on the literary scene while working as a detective with the LAPD with his 1971 novel, "The New Centurions," followed by such bestsellers as "The Blue Knight" and "The Choirboys. " In 1973, he created the Emmy Award-winning NBC anthology series "Police Story," which ran until 1978. On Tuesday, Shout! Factory is releasing the first season of the series, a precursor to such cop shows as NBC's "Hill Street Blues" and ABC's "NYPD Blue.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 2010
Hollywood Hills A Novel Joseph Wambaugh Little, Brown: 356 pp., $26.99
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 2008 | STEVE LOPEZ
If you'll indulge a confession, I'm a happy guy sitting across from a cop -- or even a retired cop -- with my notebook on the table and a beer in my hand. They've all got stories, some funny, some dark, some of them even true. That's what led me to call Joseph Wambaugh at his home in San Diego last week and see if he wanted to meet for dinner and a margarita or two at Villa Sombrero, a Highland Park institution and longtime hangout for him and other cops. The Sombrero was preparing to shut down, at least for now, because of a dispute between the restaurant owner and property owner.
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